Maul Publisher

Version: 
3.16
Release date: 
Saturday, 9 January, 2010
Price: 
€ 113.85

License:

Interface:

Authors/Port authors:

Maul Publisher is aimed at anyone needing to quickly create pleasing and sophisticated publications, without the high cost of one of the industry leading packages. It is aimed at anyone wanting to quickly create printed presentations, club magazines, business cards, cd inlays, or posters.

Maul Publisher is an industrial strength desktop publisher capable of creating virtually all of the printing seen on everyday household items. You can use it to easily lay out newspapers, cards, books, labels, stamps, posters, charts, forms, and even designs like building plans or furniture arrangements.

Maul contains a huge number of sophisticated features specifically for publishing. These include booklet printing and collation, precision bitmap scaling, prepress reports, color management, layout guides, style sheets, and much more.

The following are all actual examples of how people use Maul:

  • To create company logo's and clipart which can subsequently be copied and pasted into your preferred word processor. Maul's ability to place kerned text on a curve is a hot favorite.
  • To create Adobe® Acrobat documents with a pdf distiller. On OS/2 this can be done with ePDF and Ghostscript
  • To create diagrams and flowcharts. Maul's ability to create vertical text or text on a line is a great bonus when it comes to labeling. Also, the objects can be easily grouped and rotated.
  • To create posters (or postage stamps). Maul's ability to scale to any page size helped to create the posters for an OS/2 exhibition in Belgium. Using a large inkjet plotter, the organisers were able to produce giant A0 posters in minutes.
  • To create badges and labels. The guides and ruler bars allow you to very precisely position the print on the label. Mail merge enables the production of badges or address labels. Best of all, you can use Maul's amazing graphics capabilities to really pep up those labels. Badges made with Maul Publisher have become a hot favorite at Warpstock Europe.
  • To create picture libraries. Maul's ability to offline images enabled an 80Mb publication to hold 600Mb worth of images, and made it possible to quickly browse and edit those images.
  • Banners. Web site creators often use Maul to create a banner. The banner can be directly exported as a JPEG image, for example. The site manglais.com was created in this way.
  • Architectural planning applications. Using Maul, a planning application was created showing floor plans, graphic designs for the finished building, and even photographs with graphical overlays showing the proposed changes. With the ruler bars scaled to show the true dimensions of the project, designing your dream home is easy.
  • Birthday cards to newsletters. Of course Maul is mostly used for this purpose, and you can also get away from that kind blocky look you get from the usual word processors or office applications.

Maul is available in both German and English, and provides true multilingual support.

This software is distributed as compressed package. You have to download and manually install it; if prerequisites are required, you will have to manually install them too.

Manual installation

Program is distributed as ZIP package: download to temporary directory and unpack to destination folder. Install the base package and at least one language package. See below for download link(s).

You can install the prerequisites with rpm running the following string in a command line:

yum install ghostscript ghostscript-fonts
Following links are to additional programs, not mandatory but useful:

Following ones are the download links for manual installation:

Base v. 3.16 (9/1/2010, Maison Anglais, Peter Koller) Readme/What's new
This version is released thanks to user feedback. In particular, problems with the Tables handler and spell checking and hyphenation have been addressed. A memory leak was fixed on the 9th Jan 2010, if you have downloaded earlier, please replace the binaries (maulebin316.zip) and reinstall. Fixed Spell checking and hyphenation. Fixed Delete Row in Tables handler. Fixed Text Copy in Tables handler. Fixed inconsistencies in keyboard shortcuts - Please reset the keyboard shortcuts in Maul options menu. This version adds features designed to make certain common DTP tasks much simpler. The colour tuning dialog has been moved out of the bitmap handler, and can now adjust the colours of any object in the document. This has been extended with the ability to adjust groups of frames, such as used for company logos. Further still, the colour adjustment has been modified to make it possible to turn a colour logo into a graytone version without turning primary colours into white. To simplify the creation of business cards, you can now add several to one page, and drag them around until they snap to each other. Improved error logging messages are more readable. Fixed 'text object in a chain' deletion, undo and redo. Allows cut, copy paste and delete of lassoed sets of frames. Changed - Colour sliders from YUV (wrong) to HSB, and fixed the maths involved. Fixed application freeze when editing some unicode characters. Fixed incorrect bitmap handling - this may cause faulty display in older docs with 24bpp bmps. New - Snap to frames. You can now set the frames to snap to each other when dragging. New - Adjust colours of whole groups of frames, regardless of their content. New - Adjust primary colours to equivalent gray tones.
 www.manglais.com/download/maulebin316.zip
DE v. 3.16 (28/12/2009)
 www.manglais.com/download/maulelde316.zip
EN v. 3.16 (28/12/2009)
 www.manglais.com/download/maulelen316.zip
Translation Toolkit (26/12/2009) Readme/What's new
Maul Publisher Installer Manual =============================== Installation Commandline ======================== When performing an automatic install, the language determines which files are installed. For automatic subsystem installations the entire set of available subsystems are installed. When automatically uninstalling the entire set of files are uninstalled. The following commandline parameters are available:- ==================================================== /? or /h Get a short form of this help file in a dialog. /n No Holdup mode ensures that the installer does not pause. Default = Stop with messages /t<path> Define target path. The path must exist or the installer will fail. The target filename cannot contain spaces. Default = /tc:\maul /l<language> Define language. The following installer files must exist <language>.insr <language>.insl <language>.ipk packing.lst various *.lpk, *.pkl, and *.pk files. Default = /lenglish The installer will halt and ask for a language if none is specified and more than one language is available. /x (use with /a) The installer checks for updates and exits if there is nothing to do. /x<handle> (use with /a) Maul can call the installer with a window handle in order to force a quit. Select just one of the following for an automated install /i Install files /u Uninstall files /s Subsystem install /a Network update (do not use with /n) Default = Wait for a button click Installer script syntax descriptions ==================================== Make sure that the uninstall entries appear in the reverse order to the install entries. This ensures that the folders are deleted in reverse order! Installation sequence ===================== Installation is done in three runs. 1:files 2:desktop objects 3:config.sys Uninstallation is preformed in the reverse order. 1:desktop objects 2:config.sys 3:files This ensures that links to objects and configuration items are undone in reverse order. The <uinst> section of the install script should follow this same reverse order philosophy. Fixpack dates ============= Fixpacks are named according to a predetermined format. This format is used to ensure that subversion numbers are generated to prevent old fixpacks being installed over newer ones. month, day, year, fix, version month, hex from 1 to c day, from 0 to 31 year, n chars, from 2000 upwards, default = 2005 if the year is missing So 29th October 2006 and V3.08 = a296fix308 Understanding install script parameters ======================================= Quotes ------ All parameters can be in quotes. This can help to distinguish items that would otherwise be seen as being two items. In effect, [mainpath] and "[mainpath]" means the same thing. but hello, there is seen as two parameters, while "hello, there" is seen as just one. valid path names ---------------- [mainpath] [dllpath] [etcpath] [dictpath] ...after you set the language these will be different [nlspath] [nlshelp] or [nlshlp] or [helppath] [nlsdocs] [nlsinfo] or [nlsinf] Package names for <inst> ------------------------ An installation will often consist of several packages. These packages are package files created with pack2.exe, which is part of the OS/2 developers toolkit. These packages are usually copied to the destination install folder. In it's simplest form, the package name may just be the filename of the packed data. Such as "mydata.pk". More complex forms allows several packages to be enumerated with a ; between each. This is of the form "data1.pk;data2.pk;data3.pk". Last, you may face the situation where no packed files are provided at all. In that case, you can use the term "!none", to indicate that there is nothing to be copied. Names ----- Names are used to create program icons on the desktop. Such program icons can also be shadow objects, helpfiles, or weblinks. Because such names may have to contain a newline character, escape sequences are allowed. The escape sequence for a newline is '\n'. If you need the backslash, you must use '\\'. Logstrings and status strings ----------------------------- In essence, the logsting is used to describe the item being processed. The logstring should always be in english. This is because the logstring is used to write to a logfile, which ends up describing the install process. If there is a problem, I, the developer, need to understand the logfile. The status string is what the user sees in the install window, and should be in the end users own language. It should be sufficiently detailed to describe properly what is happening. General ======= <info>info; ----------- Provides information about the installation performed by this file. The info is listed as a comment in the install listbox. Only one <info> entry is read, and it should be at the top of the install files. Install and subsystem install ============================= <inst>packname, logstring, statusstring, packlist; -------------------------------------------------- Describes the packages to be installed. This entry calculates the size of the installation items by reading information from the packlist. The entry is used to add an install item to the install listbox. All entries between this <inst> and the next are treated as a single set of install operations to perform. The only optional item for this entry is packlist. If it is missing, no filesize calculations are performed. The packlist is not used when installing subsystems, however subsystem files become part of the main installation once the have been copied to the install destination. The packlist parameter can be set to "!none". The packname is made up of a list of packages to copy to the install destination. You can use "!none" if no packages are to be copied. examples:- <inst>"execute.pk", "executables", "Main executables", packing.lst; <inst>"english.lpk;english_HLP.lpk", "Langpack", "English language pack", "english.pkl"; <inst>"a296fix308.pk;a296fix308.pki;a296fix308.pkm", "a296fix308", "Fix installer and wingstamp"; <version>minversion, newversion; -------------------------------- minversion is ignored when the install control file is not from a fixpack. minversion can be set to 0 if not used. The version is set to newversion. When installing a fixpack, the current version must be >= minversion. Once installed, the fixpack cannot be installed again, the versions no longer match. Fixpacks also track subversions so that fixpack are not installed twice where the main version does not change. examples:- <version>0, 314; <version>313, 314; <lang>language; --------------- This is used to alter the predetermined national language support folder paths. The nls folder is defined as [nlspath], and it's value is "[mainpath]/language.NLS". If the mainpath is set to "c:\maul" at the start of the installation, and you set <lang> to "ENGLISH", the nls support folders will resolve to:- [nlspath] = "c:\maul\ENGLISH.NLS" [nlshelp] = "c:\maul\ENGLISH.NLS\HELP" [nlsdocs] = "c:\maul\ENGLISH.NLS\DOCS" [nlsinfo] = "c:\maul\ENGLISH.NLS\INF" You can change these paths at any point after an <inst> entry. The value remains constant for all subsequent <inst> entries unless you change it. examples:- <lang>"english"; <foldobj>parentid, foldid, name, statusstring; ---------------------------------------------- Creates a desktop folder object named 'name'. The parent id should be set to WP_DESKTOP for the topmost folder you create on the desktop. The function adds <> around the id's given, as this is required by WinCreateObject(). The name can contain a \n escape sequence to create a multiple line name for the object. examples:- <foldobj>"WP_DESKTOP", "MAULFOLD", "Desktop Publisher", "Main Desktop Folder"; <foldobj>"MAULFOLD", "MAULDOCSEN", "Documents", "Documents Folder"; <foldobj>"MAULFOLD", "MAULINFOEN", "Manuals", "Manuals Folder"; <urlobj>parentid, id, name, statusstring, url; ---------------------------------------------- Creates a desktop object named 'name', of type WPUrl. These are weblinks to allow the end user to click on an icon to access a web page. The name can contain a \n escape sequence to create a multiple line name for the object. examples:- <urlobj>"MAULFOLD", "MAULABOUT", "About Maul\nPublisher", "About maul publisher weblink", "http://www.manglais.com/subs/php/product.php?MAULE300"; <infobj>file, path, name, statusstring, parentid; ------------------------------------------------- Creates a help manual desktop object named 'name'. The parentid is optional and defaults to 'MAULINFO'. Because of national language considerations, the default is best avoided! The name can contain a \n escape sequence to create a multiple line name for the object. examples:- <infobj>"maul.inf", [nlsinfo], "Using\nMaul Publisher", "Maul Publisher info", "MAULINFOEN"; <dskobj>file, path, name, statusstring, type, parentid; ------------------------------------------------------- Creates an application desktop object named 'name', of type 'type'. The type is optional and defaults to 'PM'. Use 'WINDOWABLEVIO' or 'FULLSCREEN' for OS/2 command line objects. See the "Workplace Shell Reference" -> Workplace Object Classes -> WPProgram for wpSetup override strings. The parentid is optional and defaults to 'MAULFOLD'. The name can contain a \n escape sequence to create a multiple line name for the object. examples:- <dskobj>"maul.exe", [mainpath], "Maul Publisher", "Main Program"; <dskobj>"install.cmd", "[mainpath]install", "Install/\nUninstall", "Installer", "PM", "MAULINST"; <docobj>file, path, name, statusstring, appname, parentid; ---------------------------------------------------------- Creates a document desktop object with the application 'appname'. The parentid is optional and defaults to 'MAULFOLD'. The appname is optional and defaults to 'VIEW.EXE'. If it's just a plain text object, you might be better off using 'E.EXE', for example. The name can contain a \n escape sequence to create a multiple line name for the object. examples:- <docobj>"readme.english", "[mainpath]install", "readme", "readme", "E.EXE", "MAULDOCSEN"; <docobj>"CPYRIGHT", [nlsdocs], "Copyright", "Copyright information", "E.EXE", "MAULFOLD"; <shadow>parentid, id, path, statusstring; ----------------------------------------- Creates a desktop shadow object in the <parentid> folder. Note that the file or folder described in "path" must exist! examples:- <shadow>"MAULFOLD", "MAULERROR", "[mainpath]error.log", "Error log"; <shadow>"MAULFOLD", "MAULTOOLS", "[mainpath]tools", "Tools Folder"; <file>name, destination, logstring, statusstring; ------------------------------------------------ Copy a file, usually an installer file! examples:- <file>"install.exe", "[mainpath]install", "INSTALLER", "Copy installer"; <file>"english.ipk", "[mainpath]install", "INST_IPK", "Copy installer library"; <arch>packname, destination, logstring, statusstring; ----------------------------------------------------- Installs an entire packed archive into a given destination. examples:- <arch>"a296fix308.pkm", "[mainpath]", "MAINPACK", "Unpacking maul.exe"; <arch>"a296fix308.pki", "[mainpath]install", "INSTPACK", "Unpacking fixed Installer"; <part>packname, destination, logstring, statusstring, file; Installs just one file out of a packed archive into the destination. The file must be found in the archive. examples:- <part>"execute.pk", [mainpath], "EXEFILE", "Unpacking executable file", "MAUL.EXE"; <addcf>setstring, path, file; ----------------------------- Adds a new entry to the config file like:- "SET setstring=path\file;" There is no method of removing this again during uninstall. If the "SET" entry exists, it is REMed out, and a new entry is added to replace it. Maul does not require the use of this command. examples:- <addcf>"mymaul", "[mainpath]", "MAUL.EXE"; (config.sys will have the entry "SET mymaul=c:\maul\MAUL.EXE" added) <pathcf>setstring, path; ------------------------ Adds a path to a given set string. This can be used to set the helppath or path in config.sys. i.e. <pathcf>path, [etcpath]; adds [etcpath] to "SET PATH=..." examples:- <pathcf>help, [nlshelp]; <pathcf>path, [etcpath]; <run>"install script", "path input into script"; ------------------------------------------------ Runs an OS/2 command line script, rexx, or executable using a system() call. The path is added as the last input into the script, and it is up to the script to perform it's task in the correct place. examples:- <run>"mkartdir.cmd", "[etcpath]"; <run>"fileswap.exe install.exe instnew.exe /v /d /r", "[mainpath]install"; //cleans out old packages <clean>childpathspec, path, logstring, statusstring; ---------------------------------------------------- Deletes files according to the filespec. "childpathspec" is appended onto "path", in such a way that in the example below, the files that are deleted are "c:\maul\install\*fix302.*" examples:- <clean>"install\*fix302.*", [mainpath], "old fixpacks", "Remove old fixpacks" <self>newfile, runflag, runparms; --------------------------------- Causes the installer to replace itself with the new file, and if "runflag" resolves to 1, runs the new file with the "runparms". This had better be the last install entry in a script, because the installer must exit immediately after this call. The runpath is presumed to be "[mainpath]/install". examples:- <self>"instnew.exe", "1", "/f"; <loader>dllname; ---------------- Adds a dll name to the end of MAUL_DLL.LST. This file is part of the base installation and is found in "[mainpath]/bin". examples:- <loader>"txthand.dll"; Uninstall ========= <uinst>packname, logstring, statusstring; ----------------------------------------- Describes the packages to be uninstalled. The entry is used to add an uninstall item to the uninstall listbox. All entries between this <uinst> and the next are treated as a single set of uninstall operations to perform. Only the log string is actually used to write to the logfile. You can copy <inst> entries to <uinst> entries, but you will need to do so in the reverse order. <lang>language; --------------- This is used to alter the predetermined national language support folder paths. The nls folder is defined as [nlspath], and it's value is "[mainpath]/language.NLS". If the mainpath is set to "c:\maul" at the start of the uninstallation, and you set <lang> to "ENGLISH", the nls support folders will resolve to:- [nlspath] = "c:\maul\ENGLISH.NLS" [nlshelp] = "c:\maul\ENGLISH.NLS\HELP" [nlsdocs] = "c:\maul\ENGLISH.NLS\DOCS" [nlsinfo] = "c:\maul\ENGLISH.NLS\INF" You can change these paths at any point after a <uinst> entry. The value remains constant for all subsequent <uinst> entries unless you change it. examples:- <lang>"english"; <uask>file, path, question; --------------------------- Checks that 'file' exists before asking "Confirm delete of 'question' in 'path'" and skips the file if the response is negative. If positive, the file is deleted. examples:- <uask>"maul.exe", "[mainpath]", "Maul Publisher"; <pathcf>setstring, path; ------------------------ Removes a path from a given set string. This can be used to unset the helppath or path in config.sys. i.e. <pathcf>path, [etcpath]; removes [etcpath] from "SET PATH=..." examples:- <pathcf>help, [nlshelp]; <pathcf>path, [etcpath]; <arch>packname, destination, logstring, statusstring; ----------------------------------------------------- Removes all files (*.*) from "destination" folder, and then tries to remove the "destination" folder. It doesn't really matter what parameters you put in packname, logstring, or statusstring, they are all ignored! examples:- <arch>"execute.pk", [mainpath], "EXEPACK", "Deleting executable"; <arch>"libs.pk", [dllpath], "LIBPACK", "Deleting libraries"; <part>packname, destination, logstring, statusstring, file; ----------------------------------------------------------- Deletes "file" from "destination". All parameters need to be present, only "file" and "destination" are actually used. examples:- <part>"execute.pk", [mainpath], "EXEFILE", "Scrapping executable file", "MAUL.EXE"; <multi>childpathspec, path, logstring, statusstring; ---------------------------------------------------- Deletes all folders and their contents that meet the "childpathspec" in the "path". Used to remove clipart catalogues and the files that they contain. examples:- <multi>"*.cat", [etcpath], "ARTPACK", "Deleting example frames"; <self>path; ----------- Deletes all files in "path", then deletes the path. If the installer is running in a path under the [mainpath], the call will give a warning, and do nothing. In other words, the installer won't remove "c:\maul\install" unless it is run from somewhere else, which implies that a set of install packages always remain on the system. examples:- <self>"[mainpath]install"; <file>path, file; ----------------- Deletes "file" from "path". See <part>, which does exactly the same thing. examples:- <file>[mainpath], "CPYRIGHT"; <urun>"uninstall script", "path input into script"; <run>"uninstall script", "path input into script"; ------------------------- Runs an OS/2 command line script, rexx, or executable using a system() call. The path is added as the last input into the script, and it is up to the script to perform it's task in the correct place. For uninstalling, <run, and <urun> are identically treated. <foldobj>parentid, foldid, name, statusstring; ---------------------------------------------- Removes any old desktop objects. Only "foldid" and statusstring are used, and "foldid" should be the same identifier that you used for creating the desktop object. Remember that this call will delete all child objects too, so the only call you really need is to remove the top folder in the tree. examples:- <foldobj>"WP_DESKTOP", "MAULFOLD", "Desktop Publisher", "Deleting Main Desktop Folder and all it contains";
 www.manglais.com/download/maulettk316.zip
Record updated last time on: 18/06/2019 - 05:22

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