Corrective Service facility

Version: 
2-B
Release date: 
Monday, 1 January, 2001

License:

Interface:

Utility program needed to apply the OS/2 fixpaks.

This software is distributed as compressed package. You have to download and manually install it; if prerequisites are required, you will have to manually install them too.

Following ones are the download links for manual installation:

Corrective Service facility v. 2-B 1.44 (2/1/2001, International Business Machines Corporation (IBM)) Readme/What's new
Readme for Corrective Service Facility 2-B Version 1.44 **************************** NOTE: Change bars (|) included to the left of the text indicate that this line has changed or been added since the last READ.ME update. | This readme file describes the features available with Version 1.44 of the Corrective Service Facility (referred to in this document as the FixTool). Once you use this version of the FixTool to service a product, you will not be able to use Version 1.37B or earlier. SYSLEVEL files are modified by FixTool 1.38 and later, causing FixTool 1.37B or earlier not to find products to service. This document supplements the information given in the README.INF that comes with the FixTool. The README.INF includes more details about the FixTool process. CONTENTS: Section 1. How to Use the FixTool EXE (Zip) File Section 2. Files Included in the FixTool EXE File Section 3. How to Tell What FixTool Version You Have Section 4. Basic Installation for First-Time Fix Pack Users Section 5. Other Ways to Apply Service | Section 6. Information about ARCHIVE, BACKUP, and COMMIT Section 7. How to Set Up the FixTool for Remote Installation Section 8. How to Customize the Response File Section 9. How to Turn Off Archiving for a Fix Pack Section 10. Setting Environment Variables Section 11. If You Have a Problem Section 12. Common Error Messages Section 13. Other Known Problems Section 14. List of Changes Made for Each Version (1.38 and Later) ****************************************************************************** Section 1. How to Use the FixTool EXE (Zip) File First, unzip the FixTool zip file onto a diskette or into a directory. You can do this by copying the self-extracting zip file into a new subdirectory and then use the following commands from an OS/2 command prompt: <d>: cd <directory> | CSx144 <target> where <d> is the drive that you've put the FixTool zip file on, <directory> is the directory that you've copied the self-extracting zip file to. x Country code, where '_' is the US country code. Other NLV country codes are identical to the Country code used in Fix Pack's. <target> is the fully qualified path where the file is to be unzipped to. If <target> is not a diskette, you can also copy all the files in <target> | onto a diskette, except for CSx144.EXE if you wish. Next, you need OS/2 boot capability. For this, you can use any of the following: - boot the install diskettes for the product you're servicing - create utility diskettes from your system and boot these - use a maintenance partition if you have one - boot through Alt-F1 and go to the command prompt - boot OS/2 as usual and then open an OS/2 session ****************************************************************************** Section 2. Files Included in the FixTool EXE File The following files are included in the FixTool EXE (Zip) file: File Use -------------- ----------------------------------------------------------- BUILD.LVL Contains build information for this FixTool release. CSFPANS.DLL Used by FSERVICE | SERVICE.EXE Executable for applying service through a windowed session SERVICE.HLP SERVICE help file SHPIINST.DLL FixTool required DLL UNPACK.EXE Used to unpack files being serviced UNPACK2.EXE Used to unpack files being serviced VIOCALLS.DLL FixTool required DLL | FSERVICE.EXE Executable for applying service through a command line (used with a response file). IBMCSFLK.DLL Locked file device driver file | IBMCSFLK.EXE Locked file device driver file IBMCSFLK.SYS Locked file device driver file IBMCSFLK.MSG Locked file device driver file PACK.EXE Used to pack files being archived or backed up README.INF General Installation instructions for the FixTool RESPONSE.LAN Response file for servicing network-related products RESPONSE.WP3 Response file for servicing OS/2 Warp v3 base | RESPONSE.WP4 Response file for servicing OS/2 Warp v4 base, | OS/2 Warp Server for e-business and OS/2 Warp | Convenience Packages RESPONSE.BDD Response file for servicing OS/2 Warp Base Device Drivers FSERVICE.MSG FSERVICE message file FPINST.CMD Command file for applying service through FSERVICE (uses standard response files for OS/2 Warp 3, OS/2 Warp 4, | OS/2 Warp Server for e-business, OS/2 Warp Convenience | Packages, OS/2 Base Device Drivers, and network-related | Fix Packs) NLS.DLL FixTool required DLL MSG.DLL FixTool required DLL FILEFIX.DLL FixTool required DLL ARCHCTL.CMD Command file that allows you to turn off archiving for a particular Fix Pack. | READ.ME This file ****************************************************************************** Section 3. How to Tell What FixTool Version You Have | You can tell if you have Version 1.44 by running BLDLEVEL on SERVICE.EXE or FSERVICE.EXE. You will see one of the following, depending on which version of BLDLEVEL.EXE you have. | Signature: @#IBM:F.144#@ OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 Vendor: IBM | Revision: 0.144 | File Version: 0.144 Description: OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 | Signature: @#IBM:F.144#@ OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 Vendor: IBM | Revision: F.144 Description: OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 The new version of the FixTool (Corrective Service Facility) updates the current CSD field in the SYSLEVEL files of the products it services. After | applying a Fix Pack with Version 1.44, you will be able to run SYSLEVEL and tell what Fix Packs you have applied by looking at the current field of the product's SYSLEVEL file. This version is also compatible with Software Choice features. If you need to use Software Choice to install new features for a product, the FixTool will integrate SYSLEVEL and archive information from the Software Choice install the next time it services that product. ****************************************************************************** Section 4. Basic Installation for First-Time Fix Pack Users This is a very basic set of instructions to help you install an OS/2 Warp Fix Pack; it contains installation tips from OS/2 support technicians. This document is designed to help you understand how to prepare your system and then install an OS/2 Warp base or Base Device Driver Fix Pack. It is important that you also read the README file supplied with the Fix Pack you are installing. This document only discusses local Fix Pack installations from diskettes using | the Corrective Service Facility (CSF) FixTool 1.44. For other methods of installation see Section 5. Before you can begin the Fix Pack installation, either obtain the Fix Pack diskettes from IBM, or download the Fix Pack and run LOADDSKF.EXE to convert the downloaded Fix Pack images into a usable diskette format. Note: LOADDSKF.EXE can be found on the OS/2 Warp installation CD in the DISKIMGS directory. 4.1. Prerequisites: 4.1.1. You must have at least 70 megabytes of free space available on your hard drive. At least 20 MB of the 70 MB must be available on the C: drive if installing to another partition. To determine how much free space is available, open an OS/2 Command Prompt window and type CHKDSK; then press Enter. CHKDSK will search the disk and report its findings, including the number of kilobytes available for use. This number must exceed 70000 kilobytes. 4.1.2. You must create utility diskettes. These diskettes will allow you to boot to a command prompt and perform various utility maintenance jobs on your computer to prepare it for the Fix Pack install as well as to help recover from some minor problems. 4.1.2.1. How to create utility diskettes: Note: Before you begin, you must have three blank diskettes and the installation CD for OS/2 Warp 3 or Warp Server, or four blank diskettes | and the installation CD for OS/2 Warp 4, Warp Server for e-business, or OS/2 Warp Convenience Packages. a. From the desktop, click on the OS/2 System icon, b. Click on the System Setup icon, c. Click on the Create Utility Diskettes icon. d. Follow the prompts to label, insert and remove the diskettes. 4.1.3. Run CHKDSK. The computer must be running well before you install a Fix Pack. If you are experiencing any problems with your machine, please contact your technical support representative to get the machine fixed. Even if your machine is running well, it is a good idea to run CHKDSK; it may find and fix some unknown problems. 4.1.3.1 To run CHKDSK: a. Shut down the computer. b. Insert Utility Diskette 1 in drive A: and restart the computer. c. Replace the diskettes as prompted, until you reach an A:\ prompt. d. Insert the last utility diskette (Utility Diskette 3 for OS/2 Warp 3, | Utility Diskette 4 for OS/2 Warp 4 or Warp Server for e-business or | CD for OS/2 Warp Convenience Packages). e. At the A:\ prompt, type CHKDSK C: /F, then press Enter. CHKDSK will search the disk and attempt to fix any problems. f. If CHKDSK reports any problems, record the errors, then rerun CHKDSK to verify that the problems were actually fixed. 4.1.4. DO NOT USE YOUR SYSTEM Once you begin a Fix Pack installation, do not try to use your system for any other purpose. Unexpected problems may arise, causing the Fix Pack installation to fail. 4.1.5. Record Your Current Revision Level Number. Before beginning the Fix Pack installation, verify the current version and revision level of the operating system, as follows: Open an OS/2 Command Prompt window, and type VER /R, then press Enter. Record the information displayed; for example: The Operating System/2 Version is 4.00 Revision 9.030 Once you have completed the Fix Pack installation, you can verify that the revision number has been properly updated. 4.1.6. UNDERSTAND ALL THE WORDS If there are any words, phases or instructions in this document that you do not understand or if you do not know their meaning, please contact your local support representative for an explanation. Once you have successfully completed all of the above steps, and are satisfied that your system is in good working order and ready to begin, proceed to the instructions below. If you have any questions or concerns, contact you computer support adminstrator and address them before continuing. 4.2. Basic Installation Instructions There are several ways to install a Fix Pack; this section of the readme uses the FPINST procedure. 1. Shutdown your computer. 2. Insert Utility Diskette 1 in the diskette drive and restart the computer, either by turning on the power, or pressing the Ctrl+Alt+Del keys. 3. As prompted, remove and insert utility diskettes until you come to an A:\ prompt. 4. Remove the current utility diskette, and insert the last of the series (Utility Diskette 3 for OS/2 Warp 3, or Utility Diskette 4 | for OS/2 Warp 4, Warp Server for e-business or CD for OS/2 Warp | Convenience Packages). 5. Type CHKDSK C: /F then press Enter. This will run the CHKDSK program. Review the reported findings. Look for any recognizable problems and fix them. Note: If CHKDSK does detect problems, run the command again, to verify that the problems were really fixed. If CHKDSK continues to find problems and is unable to fix them, please contact your local support representative to resolve the problems before continuing with the Fix Pack installation. 6. As mentioned in Section 2.1 above, CHKDSK also reports the amount of free space remaining. If you have at least 70 MB free (70000 Kilobytes or 70000000 Bytes) then you can proceed with the Fix Pack install. If not, you must delete or move enough files to meet the free space requirement before continuing. | 7. Insert the Corrective Service FixTool diskette (CSF FIXT 144). 8. At the command prompt, enter one of the following commands and then press Enter. For an OS/2 Warp 3 or Warp Server Base Fix Pack: FPINST WARP3 For an OS/2 Warp 4 Base Fix Pack: FPINST WARP4 For an OS/2 Warp Server for e-business Base Fix Pack: FPINST WSEB | For an OS/2 Warp Convenience Packages : | FPINST CONVP For an OS/2 Base Device Driver Fix Pack: FPINST BASEDD <source drive> For an OS/2 LAN or Network related Fix Pack: FPINST NETWORK <d> 9. The Fix Pack installation program will perform a variety of functions. Note: Near the beginning of the Fix Pack installation, it may appear as if nothing is happening. Please be patient. Note: Base Device Driver fixpacks may require running the following command: \FIX\FIXTOOL.EXT\FIXTPREP.EXE which is located on Base Device Driver Diskette 1. This command only needs to be run if this is the first time you are installing a Base Device Driver Fix Pack on an OS/2 Base System. The only other user action required will be to remove and insert diskettes as prompted. When the installation is complete, you will be informed and prompted to restart the computer. Do this by pressing Ctrl+Alt+Del, or by turning the power off and then back on. ****************************************************************************** Section 5. Other Ways to Apply Service Once you have boot capability (see Section 1) and are at a command prompt, you can apply service using one of the following methods: Using FPINST Using SERVICE Using FSERVICE with a custom RESPONSE.FIL Insert the FixTool diskette you created, or change to the directory that the FixTool is in, and then use FPINST or FSERVICE as described in Sections 5.1 and 5.3. To use SERVICE as described in Section 5.2, you must have OS/2 running without having booted from diskettes, maintenance partition, or via Alt-F1. 5.1. Using FPINST To use FPINST, change to the diskette or directory where you have FPINST.CMD and the related files, and type FPINST Fix Pack_type where Fix Pack_type is: WARP3 for applying a Fix Pack to OS/2 Warp Version 3.0. WARP4 for applying a Fix Pack to OS/2 Warp Version 4.0. WSEB for applying a Fix Pack to OS/2 Warp Server for e-business. | CONVP for applying a Fix Pack to OS/2 Warp Convenience | Packages. BASEDD src for applying a Base Device Driver Fix Pack to OS/2 Warp Version 3.0, Warp Version 4.0, or Warp Server for e-business, where src is an optional parameter for the location of the Base Device Driver source. A: is the default source location. NETWORK d for applying LAN or other network-related Fix Packs, where d is an optional parameter for the OS/2 boot drive. Use it when you have multiple OS/2 boot partitions. Note: Base Device Driver Fix Packs may require running the following command: \FIX\FIXTOOL.EXT\FIXTPREP.EXE which is located on Base Device Driver Diskette 1. This command only needs to be run if this is the first time you are installing a Base Device Driver Fix Pack on an OS/2 Base System. FPINST uses FSERVICE with default response files. These default response files do the following: For OS/2 Base Fix Packs, the default response file saves an archive copy of the files it services in <boot_drive>:\ARCHIVE. It does not keep a backup for files serviced, other than the archived files. If this is not the first OS/2 base Fix Pack installed and if you want to be able to backout to the previous Fix Pack level, you must modify the default response file. For OS/2 Base Device Driver Fix Packs, the default response file saves an archive copy of the files it services in <boot_drive>:\ARCHIVEB. It does not keep a backup for files serviced, other than the archived files. If this is not the first Base Device Driver Fix Pack installed and if you want to be able to backout to the previous Fix Pack level, you must modify the default response file. Also, the default response file does not automatically replace all files from the Fix Pack. The FixTool will prompt you to find out whether to replace any files on the system that appear to be newer than the files in the Fix Pack. This happens because the REPLACE_NEWER flag is not set in the default | response file for OS/2 Warp v3, v4, Warp Server for e-business, or Base | Device Drivers. For LAN or network-related Fix Packs, there will be no archives or backups kept by default, and the FixTool will service all partitions that contain the product being serviced by that Fix Pack. If you wish to restrict the drives serviced, you must modify the default response file. NOTE: If you need to install a Fix Pack with different options from the ones described above, then you must either modify the default response file or use SERVICE instead of FPINST. See Section 6 for information about how to modify a response file. See the next section for information about SERVICE. 5.2. Using SERVICE To use SERVICE, go to the diskette or directory where you have SERVICE.EXE and the related files. Then type SERVICE The program will prompt you for required inputs. See README.INF for more information about these panels. With FixTool Version 1.39 or later, the CSFUTILPATH defaults to the path that you have executed SERVICE from, so you do not need to set this environment variable if all the FixTool files are in the same directory with SERVICE.EXE. NOTE: To use SERVICE, you must have the OS/2 PM Shell running. You cannot run SERVICE if you have booted from install diskettes or if you pressed Alt-F1 to get to a command prompt. 5.3. Using FSERVICE To use FSERVICE from a diskette, copy your customized RESPONSE.FIL to the diskette with the FixTool files, then go to the diskette and type FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL If you have copied the FixTool files into a directory, you need to use the following command from the directory with FSERVICE.EXE and the related files (including your custom RESPONSE.FIL): FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL /S:<d>:\<directory> where <d> is the drive with the FixTool related files and <directory> is the directory structure where you put the FixTool files. There are optional parameters that can be included on the FSERVICE command line. See the README.INF file for more details about these parameters. You should use the /B:<drive> parameter with FSERVICE when applying LAN Fix Packs on systems with more than one OS/2 boot partition. <drive> is the OS/2 boot partition to be serviced. ****************************************************************************** Section 6. Information about ARCHIVE, BACKUP, and COMMIT The FixTool gives you the option to save existing files and restore your system to a previous state in case the Fix Pack contains files that are not compatible with your system. You may not need to restore your system, but it is recommended that you keep a backup copy of your files in case you encounter a problem after installing a Fix Pack. Depending on the Fix Pack type and on the state of the system you are servicing, a Fix Pack allows you to save the following files: - an archive file only If this is the first Fix Pack installed for this product and if archiving is enabled for the Fix Pack - an archive file and a backup file If archiving is enabled and if you have already installed a Fix Pack for this product - a backup file only If archiving is disabled An archive file is the initial file that is installed with the product, before any Fix Packs have been applied. A backup file is the previous file that was on the system before applying the current Fix Pack. OS/2 base and Device Driver Fix Packs have archiving enabled. LAN, MPTS, and TCP/IP Fix Packs have archiving disabled. 6.1. Keeping an Archive and/or Backup Copy of Files Serviced 6.1.1. ARCHIVE Directory When using SERVICE to install a Fix Pack, you will see a panel that either allows you to enter the drive and path to the ARCHIVE directory, or if you have previously installed a Fix Pack on this product, the ARCHIVE directory will appear greyed out and you can enter a BACKUP directory. (If archiving is disabled for this Fix Pack, you will not be able to enter an ARCHIVE directory but will be able to enter a BACKUP directory.) With FSERVICE, use the response file to specify the ARCHIVE directory. See Section 8 for more information. Note that you specify the location of the ARCHIVE when you first install a Fix Pack for a product, and this information is retained by the FixTool. You will not be able to change it manually. Do not delete the archive directory or any files in it unless you have done a COMMIT for that Fix Pack. (See Section 6.3 for more information about COMMITing a Fix Pack.) The FixTool never deletes the ARCHIVE directory, even after a Fix Pack is committed, because the ARCHIVE directory may be shared by more than one system. If you have deleted the ARCHIVE directory and cannot install a Fix Pack because FixTool cannot find the ARCHIVE directory, you should delete the LOGF0000.xxx and LOGSTART.xxx files, where xxx is the 3-character extension on the product's syslevel file. For example, LOGF0000.OS2 and LOGSTART.OS2 should be deleted for OS/2 base Fix Pack installation. These files are in the directory with the syslevel.xxx file. The ARCHIVE directory is very important. It allows you to restore your system to the original installation level (or last committed level). Each Fix Pack that's installed checks the files being replaced. If a file is to be replaced and the original file is not in the ARCHIVE directory, FixTool adds the original file to the ARCHIVE directory. 6.1.2. BACKUP Directory The BACKUP directory is handled very differently from the ARCHIVE directory. It holds only the files that were updated by the last Fix Pack installation for that product. The FixTool deletes the BACKUP directory for that product with each new Fix Pack installation. Because of this, you can change the location of the BACKUP directory with each Fix Pack if desired. When you restore your system to its BACKUP level, you are going back to the files that were used before the LAST Fix Pack was applied. For Fix Packs with archiving enabled, you will not be able to specify a BACKUP directory for the first Fix Pack installed because the original files go into the ARCHIVE directory instead of the BACKUP directory. In this case, you can only specify an ARCHIVE directory. The second Fix Pack installed and each Fix Pack after that will allow you to specify a BACKUP directory. Be aware that the ARCHIVE directory is checked during Fix Pack installation and it's possible that the same file may be in both directories. Warning: If you re-install the same Fix Pack two times, the BACKUP directory will contain only the files that were updated the second time you installed the Fix Pack. In many cases, no files will be updated during the second installation, and the BACKUP directory will be deleted, leaving you no way to restore to BACKUP level. 6.2. Recovering to a Backup or Archive Level With the presence of a valid ARCHIVE or BACKUP directory, you have some recovery options if needed. You may either recover the system by using the ARCHIVE directory, which will restore the system to the initial install state, or by using the BACKUP directory, which will return the system to the state before the last Fix Pack installation for that product. To recover, you can use either FSERVICE or SERVICE. For information about recovering with FSERVICE, see Section 8. To use SERVICE, use the Backout procedure as follows: 1. Select the "Change product list..." button from the initial panel. 2. Select the "Archived products" radio button to see the list of products with a valid ARCHIVE directory. -OR- Select the "Backed up products" radio button to see the list of products with a valid BACKUP directory. 3. De-select any products that appear on the list that you do not want to restore to the archive or backup level. Then click on the Backout button to begin the recovery process. 4. The syslevel files to be recovered will be listed in the Products field and the level to which they will be backed out will appear in the Target Level field, either ARCHIVE or BACKUP. Select OK to restore to the target level. Warning: When backing out LAN Fix Packs, be sure to select all the syslevels for the components that were originally serviced when the Fix Pack was installed. For example, Warp Server Fix Packs include updates for the syslevel.req, syslevel.srv, syslevel.mug, and syslevel.upe components. 6.3. Committing to an Installed Fix Pack Level Fixtool also allows you to COMMIT the present system (with Fix Packs applied) to be your "base" system. The COMMIT process makes your current system appear to be the archive level. When you COMMIT a product to a Fix Pack level, FixTool destroys all references to your ARCHIVE and/or BACKUP directories. It does NOT, however, delete the ARCHIVE directory because other products may be pointing to the same directory for their archives. If your system is not sharing its ARCHIVE directory with any other systems, you can delete the ARCHIVE directory. You will have to use the following before deleting the files to take off the read-only attribute: attrib -r *.* The COMMIT process allows you to free up disk space used by the ARCHIVE directory, but it also removes the ability to restore the product to initial archive level. You might want to do this if your system is stable and you do not want to return to the actual installed version for some reason. For example, if you have applied a Year 2000 Fix Pack and your system is stable, you could COMMIT to that Fix Pack level before applying any future Fix Packs. In this way, if you need to backout to archive level, you do not have to re-install the Year 2000 Fix Pack. Backing out to the ARCHIVE directory would actually back out to the stable Year 2000 Fix Pack level. To COMMIT a Fix Pack with FSERVICE, see Section 8. To COMMIT to a certain Fix Pack level using SERVICE, do the following: 1. Select the "Change product list..." button from the initial panel. 2. Select the "Uncommitted products" radio button to display a list of all products that have a valid ARCHIVE or BACKUP directory associated with them. 3. In the Uncommitted Products window, de-select any products that you do not want to commit to their current level, and then click on the Commit button. 4. When the Commit Service window is displayed, you can view the product list, archive level, and backup level, and then select OK if you are ready to commit the products listed in the window to the levels shown. Since the COMMIT process removes the archive reference to the installed system, you may safely delete the ARCHIVE directory if no other machine is using it. If you do not delete it and re-use the same directory name for your next Fix Pack install, name collisions will occur. The FixTool will handle this properly, but it will take more processing time. Also, you will be wasting disk space with the old files still in the ARCHIVE directory. 6.4. Restoring an Individual File from the ARCHIVE or BACKUP Directory If you should find the need to restore a file to a prior level, you can do this manually by locating the old file in either the ARCHIVE or BACKUP directory. The old file name will be the same as the new one with an underscore as the last character in the extension or with all underscores for the extension if there is no extension on the original filename. If there is already a file with this name in the ARCHIVE or BACKUP directory, then FixTool replaces the last character of the name with a number, starting with a 1. For example, PMMERGE.DL_ would be changed to PMMERG1.DL_ if there's a name collision. After locating the file you wish to restore, you can unpack the file in either the ARCHIVE or BACKUP directory with the following command: UNPACK filename.ex_ This unpacks the file to the same directory. If the file is not locked, you can copy the file to the location desired and reboot. If it is locked, the copy will fail, and you'll need to boot to an alternate boot source and then copy the file over and reboot. This is normally done when you believe that a regression has occurred and the older file works better on your system than the one included in the Fix Pack. ****************************************************************************** Section 7. How to Set Up the FixTool for Remote Installation To speed up Fix Pack installation or to setup a Fix Pack on a LAN drive for use by others (Redirected Install), follow these steps. Before you begin, it is recommended that you install a Virtual Floppy Disk program such as SVDISK (Super Virtual Disk) or VFDISK (Virtual Floppy Disk). In the following examples, d: is the working drive and j: is the Virtual Floppy drive. Replace this with the drive letters you use. Also in these examples, XR_W035 is the Fix Pack name. First, setup a directory to hold the FixTool code. For example, run the following to place the FixTool into the d:\csf directory. | cs_144.exe d:\csf Next, setup the Fix Pack directory using the diskette images. loaddskf xr_w035.1dk j: /f/y/q xcopy j: d:\xr_w035\ /h/o/t/s/e/r/v loaddskf xr_w035.2dk j: /f/y/q xcopy j: d:\xr_w035\ /h/o/t/s/e/r/v ... ... ... <repeat for each disk image in the Fix Pack> Install the Fix Pack by running service.exe. set csfutilpath=d:\csf set csfcdromdir=d:\xr_w035 d: cd csf service (or start service) You can also apply service by running fservice.exe with a response file. d: cd csf fservice /r:d:\csf\response.wp3 /s:d:\xr_w035 This will apply the Fix Pack to all serviceable partitions. If you want to make the response file specific to a partition (drive) then you need to change the :SYSLEVEL and :ARCHIVE lines in response.wp3: :SYSLEVEL \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVE -- should be changed to -- :SYSLEVEL x:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE x:\ARCHIVE where x: is the drive you want serviced. ****************************************************************************** Section 8. How to Customize the Response File There are three standard response files included with the FixTool that can be modified for your configuration needs. To modify a response file, copy one of the standard response files (RESPONSE.WP3, RESPONSE.WP4, or RESPONSE.LAN) to a file called RESPONSE.FIL. Modify the RESPONSE.FIL as needed, and then run FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL. The following sections show a few of the service actions you can take through a response file. For more information about response files, view the README.INF file that comes with the FixTool. 8.1. Applying Service to a Product Without an Existing Archive This response file can be used to apply service for the first time using FSERVICE when there is no existing archive of the product being serviced. It will service all partitions and place an archive in each partition. It does not take a backup of changed files. In this case, the SERVICE.LOG file will go into the C:\OS2\INSTALL directory. Files that are read-only, hidden, or system files will be replaced automatically during service. The Fix Pack source files are on A:. The FixTool will service all partitions where \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 and \MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM are found, and it will save the original files in an \ARCHIVE directory for each partition serviced. Note that the :LOGFILE tag is optional and may be overridden by using the /L: parameter on the FSERVICE command line. The :FLAGS and :SOURCE tags are also optional, but if used, the :SERVICE tag must be included. The :SOURCE tag can be overridden by using the /S: parameter on the FSERVICE command line. You should include a :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, and :ARCHIVE tag for each product to be serviced. Note that the :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, and :ARCHIVE tags must appear in the order shown in this example. The REPLACE_NEWER flag can be added to the :FLAGS line as shown here: :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED REPLACE_NEWER This flag will replace files automatically instead of giving a pop-up panel that questions whether you want to replace a file that is newer on the system with an older version from the Fix Pack. Warning: Using the REPLACE_NEWER flag may cause files to be back-leveled. Be sure that you know it is okay to replace the files that are newer before you use this flag. This flag was included in the previous default response files for OS/2 Warp 3, but has been deleted because it allows you to back-level files unintentionally. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED :SOURCE A:\ :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVE :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL \MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVEM For OS/2 Warp 4 systems, the multimedia lines are not needed in the response file. So, the last three lines in the previous example should be removed or commented out of the response file for OS/2 Warp 4.0. 8.2. Applying Service to a Product With an Existing Archive This response file can be used to apply service using FSERVICE when there is an existing archive of the product being serviced. This demonstrates the ability to take a backup of changed files. Notice that each product serviced must be backed up to a different directory, so the drive must be explicitly defined in the :SYSLEVEL, :ARCHIVE, and :BACKUP lines. Also note the order of the :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, :ARCHIVE, and :BACKUP tags. These tags must appear in this order. The :BACKUP tag is optional. The REPLACE_NEWER flag can be added to the :FLAGS line as shown here: :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED REPLACE_NEWER This flag will replace files automatically instead of giving a pop-up panel that questions whether you want to replace a file that is newer on the system with an older version from the Fix Pack. Warning: Using the REPLACE_NEWER flag may cause files to be back-leveled. Be sure that you know it is okay to replace the files that are newer before you use this flag. This flag was included in the previous default response files for OS/2 Warp 3, but has been deleted because it allows you to back-level files unintentionally. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED :SOURCE A:\ :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE C:\ARCHIVE :BACKUP C:\BACKUP :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE C:\ARCHIVEM :BACKUP C:\BACKUPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, the last four lines are not needed in the response file. 8.3. Backing Out to the Archive Level of a Product This is a sample response file to be used when backing out to the archive level of a product. Note that you can only use one :TARGET tag in the response file. Also note that the :TARGET tag must appear before a :BACKOUT tag is used. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :SOURCE A:\ :TARGET ARCHIVE :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, you do not need to include the last two lines of this example in your response file. 8.4. Backing Out to the Backup Level of a Product This is a sample response file to be used when backing out to the backup level of a product. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :SOURCE A:\ :TARGET BACKUP :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, you do not need to include the last two lines of this example in your response file. 8.5. Committing a Product This is a sample response file to be used when committing a product. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :SOURCE A:\ :COMMIT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :COMMIT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, do not include the last two lines of this example in your response file. 8.6. Redirecting an Archive of a Product to Another Existing Archive This is a sample response file to be used when redirecting an archive of a product to another existing archive location. One example of this would be for using a shared network archive. Note that the archive directory specifies the location of an existing archive to which the current product is being redirected. In this example the arbitrary drive shows S:, which may be a LAN drive. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :SOURCE A:\ :REDIRECT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE S:\ARCHIVE :REDIRECT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE S:\ARCHIVEM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, do not include the last three lines of this example in your response file. ****************************************************************************** Section 9. How to Turn Off Archiving for a Fix Pack With FixTool 1.40 and later, a new utility called ARCHCTL.CMD is included. This utility allows you to turn off the archiving feature of a Fix Pack. This is especially useful if you have already tested a Fix Pack in a controlled environment and are convinced that there will be no need to backout the Fix Pack to an original product level. With archiving turned off, you may include a backup directory and backup to your previous level if desired. But you will not be able to back up more than one level. For example, if you install OS/2 Base Fix Pack 8 with archiving turned off and include a backup directory, then when you install Fix Pack 9, the backup directory for Fix Pack 8 is deleted. If you do not include a backup directory with archiving turned off, there is no way to back up to a previous level. The syntax for the ARCHCTL utility is as follows: ARCHCTL ON|OFF Fix Pack_source where ON|OFF indicates the action to perform. ON enables archiving; OFF disables it. Fix Pack_source is normally the drive with the first Fix Pack diskette, but it can also be the root of the Fix Pack when copied to the hard disk (where the \FIX subdirectory is located). The default for OS/2 Fix Packs is ON. The default for LAN Fix Packs is OFF. Examples for turning archiving OFF: Example 1. 1. Place first Fix Pack diskette in A: 2. Enter ARCHCTL OFF A: Example 2. 1. XCOPY all Fix Pack diskette data to N:\FIXES\FP32 2. Enter ARCHCTL OFF N:\FIXES\FP32 Examples for turning archiving ON: Example 3. 1. Place first Fix Pack diskette in A: 2. Enter ARCHCTL ON A: Example 4. 1. XCOPY all Fix Pack diskette data to N:\FIXES\FP32 2. Enter ARCHCTL ON N:\FIXES\FP32 ****************************************************************************** Section 10. Setting Environment Variables There are several SET statements that set environment variables for the FixTool to use. See the table below for a list of these variables and a description of what they do. Environment Variable Usage ------------------------------- ----------------------------------- SET CSFUTILPATH=path Allows you to run SERVICE or FSERVICE from your hard drive or from a redirected drive. SET CSFCDROMDIR=path Allows you to install a Fix Pack from a redirected drive or CD-ROM. All of the Fix Pack files should be in this path. This path should NOT be pointing to a floppy (or virtual floppy) drive. SET REMOTE_INSTALL_STATE=0|1 If this variable is set to 0, then upon termination FixTool returns control to the calling process. SET CSFDRIVEAPPLY=d Allows you to restrict service to products found only on drive d and on the boot drive. SET CSFTIMESTAMP=1 Adds a timestamp to each line of the SERVICE.LOG file. SET CSFSTAGEDRIVE=d Allows you to determine where the locked files will be temporarily stored. d is the drive on which to put the locked files. SET CSFSKIPCRC=1 Allows you to skip the CRC checking of the Fix Pack files. Be careful to use this only if necessary. The CRC check identifies bad media and prevents potential problems. ****************************************************************************** Section 11. If You Have a Problem If the Fix Pack does not install properly, there are files you can look in to find out what error occurred. The SERVICE.LOG file is the first place to look. The FixTool puts it in the x:\OS2\INSTALL directory where x: is the OS/2 boot drive. If the FixTool is unable to complete processing successfully, then the next time you use the FixTool, it will try to recover, picking up from where it stopped previously. It uses information from C:\FIXSTART to recover. You may also notice a directory $CSFTMP$ on a drive that had the largest amount of free space available when the FixTool last started. It is safe to delete this directory and any files in it any time the FixTool is not running. This directory is recreated on the drive with the most free space available whenever starting the FixTool. Due to system usage and drive space changes, it may not be the same drive each time for this directory. ****************************************************************************** Section 12. Common Error Messages Here are some common error messages that you may receive when running SERVICE. - Error message: An error occurred while searching for files to update. The reason may be old or corrupt CSF logfiles, CSF_SEL.000 file, or file system corruption. See README file for more information. Explanation #1: You may get this if you have used the new FixTool (version 1.38 or later) to install a Fix Pack, and then try to use an old version of the FixTool (version 1.37B or earlier). Solution #1: If you are installing a LAN Fix Pack, you can delete all the LOGF0000.xxx and LOGSTART.xxx files on your system, and reapply the Fix Pack. If you are installing an OS/2 Fix Pack, you will also need to copy your original SYSLEVEL.OS2 file back into the \OS2\INSTALL directory. Explanation #2: You may also get this error if you are trying to service a system that has many syslevel files (over about 150) on all drives. Solution #2: If your system has a large number of syslevel files, you may have to limit the search for products to be serviced by using the following set statement before you run SERVICE: SET CSFDRIVEAPPLY=d where d is the drive you wish to service. This statement limits the search for serviceable products to one drive at a time in addition to the boot drive. This will get the number of files opened down to a workable level. - Error message: No products were found on the target system to service. Explanation #1: Your SYSLEVEL.xxx file does not contain the proper prerequisite Fix Pack number or product information. In order to install a Fix Pack, the number of the Fix Pack must be higher than the number of the current CSD in the SYSLEVEL.xxx file, or the product information must match. Solution #1: Check the prerequisites needed for the Fix Pack you are trying to install. Some Fix Packs have a particular Fix Pack that must be installed prior to installing that Fix Pack. Also, make sure that the Fix Pack you are trying to install is one that may be applied to that product. If the product information is incorrect, you may need to copy the product SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media. Explanation #2: If you have committed an OS/2 base Fix Pack with Version 1.38 or Version 1.39, you may get this message when you try to install another Fix Pack. Solution #2: Copy the product's SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media or from a backup copy that was made prior to committing the Fix Pack. - Error message: The path <path\filename> does not exist or is invalid. Explanation: FixTool could not unpack the file specified in the message, or it could not unpack the file just prior to the file specified in the message. Solution: This indicates that the Fix Pack media is bad. You should download the Fix Pack again, re-create the Fix Pack diskettes, and then re-install the Fix Pack. The FixTool will resume, starting at the point where it stopped. If you get RC=109 in the service.log, the file listed prior to the first RC=109 is probably giving an unpack error. The modules that received the 109 error were not updated properly. Make sure that you are using the UNPACK2.EXE that comes with this version of the FixTool. You should also download the Fix Pack again and re-create the Fix Pack diskettes. Then reinstall the Fix Pack from the new media. The FixTool will resume, updating any files that were not originally updated. If this does not fix the problem, please contact your service representative. - Error message: Error reading file <path>\IBMCSFLK.DLL. Explanation: FixTool could not find the files needed for servicing. Solution: Make sure that you've set the CSFUTILPATH and CSFCDROMDIR environment variables if you're running service from a hard drive. The CSFUTILPATH should point to the directory that contains the FixTool files (SERVICE.EXE, FSERVICE.EXE, etc.), and CSFCDROMDIR should point to the directory that contains the Fix Pack files (with the FIX directory). Also make sure that all the files listed in Section 2 are in your FixTool file directory. - Error message: No source drive is available. Explanation: The FixTool first checks for removable drives on the system. If there are no removable drives, you will get this error message if you have not set the CSFCDROMDIR to point to a valid hard drive or LAN drive. Solution: Set the CSFCDROMDIR to point to the drive and directory that contain the Fix Pack files. - Error message: Checksum error in <file>. Explanation: The FixTool checks the checksum of the source media with a checksum that was recorded when the Fix Pack was created. If these values do not match, you will receive this error. Solution: This indicates that the Fix Pack media is bad. Download the Fix Pack again and re-create the Fix Pack diskettes, or get another Fix Pack CD. Then reinstall the Fix Pack. The FixTool will resume, starting at the point where it stopped. - Error message: The path SET CSFCDROMDIR=<path\filename> does not exist or is invalid. Explanation: FixTool could not find the FIX directory in the path given in the SET CSFCDROMDIR statement. Solution: Check to make sure the path given in the SET CSFCDROMDIR statement is pointing to the directory that contains the Fix Pack. This directory should contain all the files and directories included in the Fix Pack. Here are some common error messages that you might see when running FSERVICE. - Error message: CSF257: No product has been selected. Explanation: This error message is reported in several situations. You may not have selected a product to service in the RESPONSE.FIL, or FSERVICE may not have found any products to service. If FSERVICE didn't find any products to service, either the product information on the system did not match the product information in the Fix Pack, or FSERVICE determined that the Fix Pack would back-level the system. Solution: Check the prerequisites for the Fix Pack and make sure that the system contains the proper pre-requisites. Also, be sure that the Fix Pack you are trying to install is being applied to the appropriate product. If the product information is incorrect, you may need to copy the product SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media. - Error message: This portion of service has completed. Reboot your system before applying additional service or using the product to process files that were locked during service. Explanation: This appears as a red screen with a title of "Corrective Service Facility Fatal Error," but the message may not indicate an error. Please view the service.log file by pressing Enter. This screen appears after doing a backout with FSERVICE so that you can check the log file to make sure there are no errors before you reboot your system. Solution: Make sure that there are no errors logged and then press Ctrl-Break to exit service. If there were no errors in the log file, then FSERVICE completed successfully and it's safe to reboot your system. - Error message: Error reading file <path>\IBMCSFLK.DLL. Explanation: FixTool could not find the files needed for servicing. Solution: Make sure that all the files listed in Section 2 are in the directory (or on the diskette) with the FixTool files. Also, make sure your /S: parameter path is valid. It should contain the Fix Pack files with the FIX directory. Sometimes you may need to include the /S: parameter--even if you have set SOURCE properly in the response file. ****************************************************************************** Section 13. Other Known Problems The following problems have also been encountered: - When using SERVICE, one of the panels contains a Reboot button that no longer is needed. This button was used when you wanted to reboot from the CSF boot diskettes, but the CSF boot diskettes are no longer available. You should select Continue, or you can select Cancel and reboot the system using boot diskettes for that product. - BOOTOS2 induced problem. BOOTOS2 (corrected in latest version) copied the SYSLEVEL.OS2 file from the booted partition which was used to create the BOOTOS2 partition to the new partition. This SYSLEVEL.OS2 file could have had default service directories that included drive letters in it. Since BOOTOS2 copied the file to a different partition, the wrong drive letter would be specified for the FixTool to use when looking for files to be serviced. The SYSLEVEL.OS2 normally would have default directories in it after one had applied service to a partition, or possibly after the system install. The net result here is that if you had a SYSLEVEL.OS2 file with default directories in it, then created a BOOTOS2 partition, and later tried to service the BOOTOS2 partition, the FixTool not only would apply service to the BOOTOS2 partition, but the default directories in the SYSLEVEL.OS2 file as well (the partition where the SYSLEVEL.OS2 came from). The solution here is to copy the SYSLEVEL.OS2 from your distribution diskette or CD into OS2\INSTALL directory of the BOOTOS2 partition before applying service to that partition. - A trap can occur if you include an unformatted drive for the archive directory. This occurs even if you format the drive in a different session before the FixTool processes any files for archiving. This happens because the FixTool scans for formatted drives at the beginning of the program and creates a list of possible drives, which is not added to during subsequent processing. The solution is to make sure that you have a valid, formatted drive given for the ARCHIVE directory BEFORE the FixTool starts. If not, you must stop and then restart the FixTool once the drive is valid. - If your drive C: is formatted with FAT32, you may get the following error message: "An error occurred. The reason may be old or corrupt CSF logfiles, CSF_SEL.000 file, or file system corruption." This is a general error message that's returned when an unexpected return code is encountered. The error is sent because the FixTool searches for the FIXSTART file on C:, and therefore needs a C: partition that contains data it can read, such as FAT or HPFS. The solution is to create a dummy C: partition that's formatted FAT or HPFS. Try to boot to that C: partition (which will fail, but allows it to remain the active C: partition). Then boot OS/2 and install the Fix Pack. Finally, boot to the other C: partition, which will make it the default C: drive. ****************************************************************************** Section 14. List of Changes Made for Each Version (1.38 and Later) This section gives a description of what changes have been made for the new versions of the FixTool (Version 1.38 and later). | NOTE: FixTool 1.44 and FixTool 1.37B are the only supported FixTools. | FixTool 1.44 supersedes all FixTools. FixTool 1.37B can continue to be used only on Fix Packs that it was released with. | All other Fix Packs should use FixTool 1.44. | Changes Made in Version 1.43 | - Added support for applying OS/2 Warp Convenience Packages using | FPINST.CMD | - Fixed a code problem dealing with systems where FAT32.IFS allowed | access to the C: drive. | - Fixed a problem where the FixTool was reporting insufficient space | on large hard drives with partitions over 4.3 MB's, even if the | the partition had enough space to allow Fix Pack Install. | - Fixed a problem with DBCS Fix Pack installation of OS/2 Warp | Convenience Packages. Changes Made in Version 1.43 - Added support for applying Warp Server for e-business and Base Device Driver Fix Packs using FPINST.CMD - Fixed a code problem dealing with resources inside the FixTool. This resource problem could make the FixTool hang under certain circumstances and make application of a Fix Pack difficult to complete. - Fixed a problem with DBCS Fix Pack installations on Warp Server for e-business SMP machines. Changes Made in Version 1.42 - Added processing to detect the drive that VoiceType, Security, and OpenDoc are installed on. These can now be serviced without the USERDIRS.OS2 file. - Changed the way forced locked files are processed. RIPL tree files will no longer be force locked, and WIN-OS/2 files on a drive other than the boot drive may be force locked. - A config.sys file of 0 bytes will no longer be created on drives being serviced that do not contain a config.sys file. - The base device driver Fix Pack will be processed as an OS/2 product instead of a LAN product. - ABIOSless machines with RAM-loaded ABIOS will be properly detected. - Added backup/backout response file information to RESPONSE.LAN file. - Modified Fixtool to work with DBCS OS/2 base operating system Fix Packs, with a pre-requisite of FX00505 for OS/2 Warp 4 and WX03807 for OS/2 Warp 3. - Can now rejoin large files that have been split across diskettes. - OS2KRNL, OS2LDR, and OS2BOOT files will only be given SYSTEM / HIDDEN attributes in the root directory. If these files are serviced in other directories, they will not be made into SYSTEM / HIDDEN files. Changes Made in Version 1.41 - Added the ability to include a timestamp in the SERVICE.LOG file. - Enhanced the performance when installing from diskettes. - Copy packed files to a temporary directory on the hard drive and then run checksum and unpack against the files on the temporary directory. An additional 1.1 MB is required for this processing. The drive used for this is the one with the most available space. - Fixed error that occurred when C: is the CD-ROM drive. CSF_SEL.000 and FIXSTART will be written to the first non-removable, non-network drive on the system. - Changed Backout routine so that any CSBKExxx.EXE exit routines will run last, after the syslevel files are updated and the files are backed out. - Updated FILEFIX.DLL to detect invalid release numbers. These must be between 1 and 255. Also, this file was updated to not return a mismatch when the file versions are the same. Changes Made in Version 1.40 - Fixes a commit problem introduced with FixTool 1.38. If you committed an OS/2 base Fix Pack with Version 1.38 or 1.39, you cannot install subsequent Fix Packs without reverting to a SYSLEVEL.OS2 file used prior to the commit (you can use the SYSLEVEL.OS2 that was shipped with the product from the product diskettes/CD). After you had done a commit, applied a FP to the committed base, and then either restored from the commit Archive or backed out an installed FP, the fact that the base was at a specific Fix Pack level was lost. The FixTool will now create in OS2\INSTALL a file named FPCOMMIT.OS2 to hold the base committed SYSLEVEL. This will be restored to SYSLEVEL.OS2 during either of these 2 restore activities. Do not erase this file. - Eliminates a SYS0039 error when using SERVICE without a diskette in the drive when starting the FixTool. - Allows you to set a new CSFDRIVEAPPLY environment variable prior to running SERVICE which will limit the search for products to be serviced to the drive given in the set statement and to the boot drive. - Includes an updated FPINST.CMD file that uses the /B: parameter for LAN-related Fix Pack installations. - Includes an updated UNPACK2.EXE and updated error handling for messages coming from UNPACK2.EXE. - Includes checksum verification on the source media. This fix prevents corrupted source files from being transferred to the target system. You may also notice a slight increase in the time it takes to process files to be updated. - Includes an ARCHCTL utility that allows you to turn off archive processing for a particular Fix Pack. Changes Made in Version 1.39 - Works with OS/2 Warp v3.0 and LAN-related Fix Packs. The backout- to-backup process was fixed for LAN-related Fix Packs. - The CSFUTILPATH environment variable does not have to be set to be able to run SERVICE from a hard drive. - Now services systems that do not have a removable media drive. - Contains an updated response file for Warp 4 systems. Changes Made in Version 1.38 NOTE: Version 1.38 of the FixTool was for use with OS/2 Warp v4.0 systems only. - Updates the CSD level in the SYSLEVEL.xxx file for all products. The CSD level is updated to match the Fix Pack number. - Recognizes Software Choice installed features. When backing out a Fix Pack, you will be given a chance to cancel the backout if a Software Choice installed feature will be broken by the Fix Pack backout. - No longer uses CSF boot diskettes. The FixTool now comes as a self-extracting zip file that can be unzipped to a single diskette. - Places the locked file device driver statements closer to the beginning of the CONFIG.SYS. - Corrects a problem with the backout-to-backup process when a file is serviced in more than one directory.
 service.boulder.ibm.com/ps/products/os2/fixtool/english-us/cs_144.exe
Corrective Service facility v. 2-B 1.43 (superseded packages including CS for IBM OS/2 Warp 3, 1/1/2001) Readme/What's new
Corrective Service facility (superseded packages including CSF for IBM OS/2 Warp 3) Readme for Corrective Service Facility 2-B Version 1.43 **************************** NOTE: Change bars (|) included to the left of the text indicate that this line has changed or been added since the last READ.ME update. | This readme file describes the features available with Version 1.43 of the Corrective Service Facility (referred to in this document as the FixTool). Once you use this version of the FixTool to service a product, you will not be able to use Version 1.37B or earlier. SYSLEVEL files are modified by FixTool 1.38 and later, causing FixTool 1.37B or earlier not to find products to service. This document supplements the information given in the README.INF that comes with the FixTool. The README.INF includes more details about the FixTool process. For more information, the following URL contains a very thorough and useful document called OS/2 FixPak Primer. It was written by Frank McKenney, an independent OS/2 consultant. http://ps.software.ibm.com/pbin-usa-ps/getobj.pl?/pdocs-usa/fp.html CONTENTS: Section 1. How to Use the FixTool EXE (Zip) File Section 2. Files Included in the FixTool EXE File Section 3. How to Tell What FixTool Version You Have Section 4. Basic Installation for First-Time FixPak Users Section 5. Other Ways to Apply Service | Section 6. Information about ARCHIVE, BACKUP, and COMMIT Section 7. How to Set Up the FixTool for Remote Installation Section 8. How to Customize the Response File Section 9. How to Turn Off Archiving for a FixPak Section 10. Setting Environment Variables Section 11. If You Have a Problem Section 12. Common Error Messages Section 13. Other Known Problems Section 14. List of Changes Made for Each Version (1.38 and Later) ****************************************************************************** Section 1. How to Use the FixTool EXE (Zip) File First, unzip the FixTool zip file onto a diskette or into a directory. You can do this by copying the self-extracting zip file into a new subdirectory and then use the following commands from an OS/2 command prompt: <d>: cd <directory> | CSx143 <target> where <d> is the drive that you've put the FixTool zip file on, <directory> is the directory that you've copied the self-extracting zip file to. x Country code, where '_' is the US country code. Other NLV country codes are identical to the Country code used in FixPak's. <target> is the fully qualified path where the file is to be unzipped to. If <target> is not a diskette, you can also copy all the files in <target> | onto a diskette, except for CSx143.EXE if you wish. Next, you need OS/2 boot capability. For this, you can use any of the following: - boot the install diskettes for the product you're servicing - create utility diskettes from your system and boot these - use a maintenance partition if you have one - boot through Alt-F1 and go to the command prompt - boot OS/2 as usual and then open an OS/2 session ****************************************************************************** Section 2. Files Included in the FixTool EXE File The following files are included in the FixTool EXE (Zip) file: File Use -------------- ----------------------------------------------------------- BUILD.LVL Contains build information for this FixTool release. CSFPANS.DLL Used by FSERVICE | SERVICE.EXE Executable for applying service through a windowed session SERVICE.HLP SERVICE help file SHPIINST.DLL FixTool required DLL UNPACK.EXE Used to unpack files being serviced UNPACK2.EXE Used to unpack files being serviced VIOCALLS.DLL FixTool required DLL | FSERVICE.EXE Executable for applying service through a command line (used with a response file). IBMCSFLK.DLL Locked file device driver file IBMCSFLK.EXE Locked file device driver file IBMCSFLK.SYS Locked file device driver file IBMCSFLK.MSG Locked file device driver file PACK.EXE Used to pack files being archived or backed up README.INF General Installation instructions for the FixTool RESPONSE.LAN Response file for servicing network-related products RESPONSE.WP3 Response file for servicing OS/2 Warp v3 base | RESPONSE.WP4 Response file for servicing OS/2 Warp v4 base and | OS/2 Warp Server for e-business | RESPONSE.BDD Response file for servicing OS/2 Warp Base Device Drivers FSERVICE.MSG FSERVICE message file FPINST.CMD Command file for applying service through FSERVICE (uses standard response files for OS/2 Warp 3, OS/2 Warp 4, | OS/2 Warp Server for e-business, OS/2 Base Device Drivers, and network-related FixPaks) NLS.DLL FixTool required DLL MSG.DLL FixTool required DLL FILEFIX.DLL FixTool required DLL ARCHCTL.CMD Command file that allows you to turn off archiving for a particular FixPak. | READ.ME This file ****************************************************************************** Section 3. How to Tell What FixTool Version You Have | You can tell if you have Version 1.43 by running BLDLEVEL on SERVICE.EXE or FSERVICE.EXE. You will see one of the following, depending on which version of BLDLEVEL.EXE you have. | Signature: @#IBM:F.143#@ OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 Vendor: IBM | Revision: 0.143 | File Version: 0.143 Description: OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 | Signature: @#IBM:F.143#@ OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 Vendor: IBM | Revision: F.143 Description: OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 The new version of the FixTool (Corrective Service Facility) updates the current CSD field in the SYSLEVEL files of the products it services. After | applying a FixPak with Version 1.43, you will be able to run SYSLEVEL and tell what FixPaks you have applied by looking at the current field of the product's SYSLEVEL file. This version is also compatible with Software Choice features. If you need to use Software Choice to install new features for a product, the FixTool will integrate SYSLEVEL and archive information from the Software Choice install the next time it services that product. ****************************************************************************** Section 4. Basic Installation for First-Time FixPak Users This is a very basic set of instructions to help you install an OS/2 Warp FixPak; it contains installation tips from OS/2 support technicians. This document is designed to help you understand how to prepare your system | and then install an OS/2 Warp base or Base Device Driver FixPak. It is | important that you also read the README file supplied with the FixPak you are installing. This document only discusses local FixPak installations from diskettes using | the Corrective Service Facility (CSF) FixTool 1.43. For other methods of installation see Section 5. Before you can begin the FixPak installation, either obtain the FixPak diskettes from IBM, or download the FixPak and run LOADDSKF.EXE to convert the downloaded FixPak images into a usable diskette format. Note: LOADDSKF.EXE can be found on the OS/2 Warp installation CD in the DISKIMGS directory. 4.1. Prerequisites: 4.1.1. You must have at least 70 megabytes of free space available on your hard drive. At least 20 MB of the 70 MB must be available on the C: drive if installing to another partition. To determine how much free space is available, open an OS/2 Command Prompt window and type CHKDSK; then press Enter. CHKDSK will search the disk and report its findings, including the number of kilobytes available for use. This number must exceed 70000 kilobytes. 4.1.2. You must create utility diskettes. These diskettes will allow you to boot to a command prompt and perform various utility maintenance jobs on your computer to prepare it for the FixPak install as well as to help recover from some minor problems. 4.1.2.1. How to create utility diskettes: Note: Before you begin, you must have three blank diskettes and the installation CD for OS/2 Warp 3 or Warp Server, or four blank diskettes | and the installation CD for OS/2 Warp 4 or Warp Server for e-business. a. From the desktop, click on the OS/2 System icon, b. Click on the System Setup icon, c. Click on the Create Utility Diskettes icon. d. Follow the prompts to label, insert and remove the diskettes. 4.1.3. Run CHKDSK. The computer must be running well before you install a FixPak. If you are experiencing any problems with your machine, please contact your technical support representative to get the machine fixed. Even if your machine is running well, it is a good idea to run CHKDSK; it may find and fix some unknown problems. 4.1.3.1 To run CHKDSK: a. Shut down the computer. b. Insert Utility Diskette 1 in drive A: and restart the computer. c. Replace the diskettes as prompted, until you reach an A:\ prompt. d. Insert the last utility diskette (Utility Diskette 3 for OS/2 Warp 3, | Utility Diskette 4 for OS/2 Warp 4 or Warp Server for e-business). e. At the A:\ prompt, type CHKDSK C: /F, then press Enter. CHKDSK will search the disk and attempt to fix any problems. f. If CHKDSK reports any problems, record the errors, then rerun CHKDSK to verify that the problems were actually fixed. 4.1.4. DO NOT USE YOUR SYSTEM Once you begin a FixPak installation, do not try to use your system for any other purpose. Unexpected problems may arise, causing the FixPak installation to fail. 4.1.5. Record Your Current Revision Level Number. Before beginning the FixPak installation, verify the current version and revision level of the operating system, as follows: Open an OS/2 Command Prompt window, and type VER /R, then press Enter. Record the information displayed; for example: The Operating System/2 Version is 4.00 Revision 9.030 Once you have completed the FixPak installation, you can verify that the revision number has been properly updated. 4.1.6. UNDERSTAND ALL THE WORDS If there are any words, phases or instructions in this document that you do not understand or if you do not know their meaning, please contact your local support representative for an explanation. Once you have successfully completed all of the above steps, and are satisfied that your system is in good working order and ready to begin, proceed to the instructions below. If you have any questions or concerns, contact you computer support adminstrator and address them before continuing. 4.2. Basic Installation Instructions There are several ways to install a FixPak; this section of the readme uses the FPINST procedure. 1. Shutdown your computer. 2. Insert Utility Diskette 1 in the diskette drive and restart the computer, either by turning on the power, or pressing the Ctrl+Alt+Del keys. 3. As prompted, remove and insert utility diskettes until you come to an A:\ prompt. 4. Remove the current utility diskette, and insert the last of the series (Utility Diskette 3 for OS/2 Warp 3, or Utility Diskette 4 | for OS/2 Warp 4 or Warp Server for e-business). 5. Type CHKDSK C: /F then press Enter. This will run the CHKDSK program. Review the reported findings. Look for any recognizable problems and fix them. Note: If CHKDSK does detect problems, run the command again, to verify that the problems were really fixed. If CHKDSK continues to find problems and is unable to fix them, please contact your local support representative to resolve the problems before continuing with the FixPak installation. 6. As mentioned in Section 2.1 above, CHKDSK also reports the amount of free space remaining. If you have at least 70 MB free (70000 Kilobytes or 70000000 Bytes) then you can proceed with the FixPak install. If not, you must delete or move enough files to meet the free space requirement before continuing. | 7. Insert the Corrective Service FixTool diskette (CSF FIXT 143). 8. At the command prompt, enter one of the following commands and then press Enter. For an OS/2 Warp 3 or Warp Server Base FixPak: FPINST Warp3 For an OS/2 Warp 4 Base FixPak: FPINST Warp4 | For an OS/2 Warp Server for e-business Base FixPak: | FPINST Wseb | For an OS/2 Base Device Driver FixPak: | FPINST Basedd <source drive> | For an OS/2 LAN or Network related FixPak: | FPINST Network <d> 9. The FixPak installation program will perform a variety of functions. Note: Near the beginning of the FixPak installation, it may appear as if nothing is happening. Please be patient. | Note: Base Device Driver fixpacks may require running the following | command: \FIX\FIXTOOL.EXT\FIXTPREP.EXE | which is located on Base Device Driver Diskette 1. This command | only needs to be run if this is the first time you are installing | a Base Device Driver FixPak on an OS/2 Base System. The only other user action required will be to remove and insert diskettes as prompted. When the installation is complete, you will be informed and prompted to restart the computer. Do this by pressing Ctrl+Alt+Del, or by turning the power off and then back on. ****************************************************************************** Section 5. Other Ways to Apply Service Once you have boot capability (see Section 1) and are at a command prompt, you can apply service using one of the following methods: Using FPINST Using SERVICE Using FSERVICE with a custom RESPONSE.FIL Insert the FixTool diskette you created, or change to the directory that the FixTool is in, and then use FPINST or FSERVICE as described in Sections 5.1 and 5.3. To use SERVICE as described in Section 5.2, you must have OS/2 running without having booted from diskettes, maintenance partition, or via Alt-F1. 5.1. Using FPINST To use FPINST, change to the diskette or directory where you have FPINST.CMD and the related files, and type | FPINST fixpak_type | | where fixpak_type is: | WARP3 for applying a FixPak to OS/2 Warp Version 3.0, | WARP4 for applying a FixPak to OS/2 Warp Version 4.0, | WSEB for applying a FixPak to OS/2 Warp Server for | e-business, | BASEDD src for applying a Base Device Driver FixPak to OS/2 | Warp Version 3.0, Warp Version 4.0, or Warp Server | for e-business, where src is an optional parameter | for the location of the Base Device Driver source. | A: is the default source location. | NETWORK d for applying LAN or other network-related FixPaks, | where d is an optional parameter for the OS/2 | boot drive. Use it when you have multiple OS/2 | boot partitions. | | Note: Base Device Driver FixPaks may require running the following | command: \FIX\FIXTOOL.EXT\FIXTPREP.EXE | which is located on Base Device Driver Diskette 1. This command | only needs to be run if this is the first time you are installing | a Base Device Driver FixPak on an OS/2 Base System. FPINST uses FSERVICE with default response files. These default response files do the following: For OS/2 Base FixPaks, the default response file saves an archive copy of the files it services in <boot_drive>:\ARCHIVE. It does not keep a backup for files serviced, other than the archived files. If this is not the first OS/2 base FixPak installed and if you want to be able to backout to the previous FixPak level, you must modify the default response file. | For OS/2 Base Device Driver FixPaks, the default response file saves an | archive copy of the files it services in <boot_drive>:\ARCHIVEB. It does not | keep a backup for files serviced, other than the archived files. If this | is not the first Base Device Driver FixPak installed and if you want to be | able to backout to the previous FixPak level, you must modify the default | response file. Also, the default response file does not automatically replace all files from the FixPak. The FixTool will prompt you to find out whether to replace any files on the system that appear to be newer than the files in the FixPak. This happens because the REPLACE_NEWER flag is not set in the default | response file for OS/2 Warp v3, v4, Warp Server for e-business, or Base | Device Drivers. For LAN or network-related FixPaks, there will be no archives or backups kept by default, and the FixTool will service all partitions that contain the product being serviced by that FixPak. If you wish to restrict the drives serviced, you must modify the default response file. NOTE: If you need to install a FixPak with different options from the ones described above, then you must either modify the default response file or use SERVICE instead of FPINST. See Section 6 for information about how to modify a response file. See the next section for information about SERVICE. 5.2. Using SERVICE To use SERVICE, go to the diskette or directory where you have SERVICE.EXE and the related files. Then type SERVICE The program will prompt you for required inputs. See README.INF for more information about these panels. With FixTool Version 1.39 or later, the CSFUTILPATH defaults to the path that you have executed SERVICE from, so you do not need to set this environment variable if all the FixTool files are in the same directory with SERVICE.EXE. NOTE: To use SERVICE, you must have the OS/2 PM Shell running. You cannot run SERVICE if you have booted from install diskettes or if you pressed Alt-F1 to get to a command prompt. 5.3. Using FSERVICE To use FSERVICE from a diskette, copy your customized RESPONSE.FIL to the diskette with the FixTool files, then go to the diskette and type FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL If you have copied the FixTool files into a directory, you need to use the following command from the directory with FSERVICE.EXE and the related files (including your custom RESPONSE.FIL): FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL /S:<d>:\<directory> where <d> is the drive with the FixTool related files and <directory> is the directory structure where you put the FixTool files. There are optional parameters that can be included on the FSERVICE command line. See the README.INF file for more details about these parameters. You should use the /B:<drive> parameter with FSERVICE when applying LAN FixPaks on systems with more than one OS/2 boot partition. <drive> is the OS/2 boot partition to be serviced. ****************************************************************************** Section 6. Information about ARCHIVE, BACKUP, and COMMIT The FixTool gives you the option to save existing files and restore your system to a previous state in case the FixPak contains files that are not compatible with your system. You may not need to restore your system, but it is recommended that you keep a backup copy of your files in case you encounter a problem after installing a FixPak. Depending on the FixPak type and on the state of the system you are servicing, a FixPak allows you to save the following files: - an archive file only If this is the first FixPak installed for this product and if archiving is enabled for the FixPak - an archive file and a backup file If archiving is enabled and if you have already installed a FixPak for this product - a backup file only If archiving is disabled An archive file is the initial file that is installed with the product, before any FixPaks have been applied. A backup file is the previous file that was on the system before applying the current FixPak. | OS/2 base and Device Driver FixPaks have archiving enabled. LAN, MPTS, and | TCP/IP FixPaks have archiving disabled. 6.1. Keeping an Archive and/or Backup Copy of Files Serviced 6.1.1. ARCHIVE Directory When using SERVICE to install a FixPak, you will see a panel that either allows you to enter the drive and path to the ARCHIVE directory, or if you have previously installed a FixPak on this product, the ARCHIVE directory will appear greyed out and you can enter a BACKUP directory. (If archiving is disabled for this FixPak, you will not be able to enter an ARCHIVE directory but will be able to enter a BACKUP directory.) With FSERVICE, use the response file to specify the ARCHIVE directory. See Section 8 for more information. Note that you specify the location of the ARCHIVE when you first install a FixPak for a product, and this information is retained by the FixTool. You will not be able to change it manually. Do not delete the archive directory or any files in it unless you have done a COMMIT for that FixPak. (See Section 6.3 for more information about COMMITing a FixPak.) The FixTool never deletes the ARCHIVE directory, even after a FixPak is committed, because the ARCHIVE directory may be shared by more than one system. If you have deleted the ARCHIVE directory and cannot install a FixPak because FixTool cannot find the ARCHIVE directory, you should delete the LOGF0000.xxx and LOGSTART.xxx files, where xxx is the 3-character extension on the product's syslevel file. For example, LOGF0000.OS2 and LOGSTART.OS2 should be deleted for OS/2 base FixPak installation. These files are in the directory with the syslevel.xxx file. The ARCHIVE directory is very important. It allows you to restore your system to the original installation level (or last committed level). Each FixPak that's installed checks the files being replaced. If a file is to be replaced and the original file is not in the ARCHIVE directory, FixTool adds the original file to the ARCHIVE directory. 6.1.2. BACKUP Directory The BACKUP directory is handled very differently from the ARCHIVE directory. It holds only the files that were updated by the last FixPak installation for that product. The FixTool deletes the BACKUP directory for that product with each new FixPak installation. Because of this, you can change the location of the BACKUP directory with each FixPak if desired. When you restore your system to its BACKUP level, you are going back to the files that were used before the LAST FixPak was applied. For FixPaks with archiving enabled, you will not be able to specify a BACKUP directory for the first FixPak installed because the original files go into the ARCHIVE directory instead of the BACKUP directory. In this case, you can only specify an ARCHIVE directory. The second FixPak installed and each FixPak after that will allow you to specify a BACKUP directory. Be aware that the ARCHIVE directory is checked during FixPak installation and it's possible that the same file may be in both directories. Warning: If you re-install the same FixPak two times, the BACKUP directory will contain only the files that were updated the second time you installed the FixPak. In many cases, no files will be updated during the second installation, and the BACKUP directory will be deleted, leaving you no way to restore to BACKUP level. 6.2. Recovering to a Backup or Archive Level With the presence of a valid ARCHIVE or BACKUP directory, you have some recovery options if needed. You may either recover the system by using the ARCHIVE directory, which will restore the system to the initial install state, or by using the BACKUP directory, which will return the system to the state before the last FixPak installation for that product. To recover, you can use either FSERVICE or SERVICE. For information about recovering with FSERVICE, see Section 8. To use SERVICE, use the Backout procedure as follows: 1. Select the "Change product list..." button from the initial panel. 2. Select the "Archived products" radio button to see the list of products with a valid ARCHIVE directory. -OR- Select the "Backed up products" radio button to see the list of products with a valid BACKUP directory. 3. De-select any products that appear on the list that you do not want to restore to the archive or backup level. Then click on the Backout button to begin the recovery process. 4. The syslevel files to be recovered will be listed in the Products field and the level to which they will be backed out will appear in the Target Level field, either ARCHIVE or BACKUP. Select OK to restore to the target level. Warning: When backing out LAN FixPaks, be sure to select all the syslevels for the components that were originally serviced when the FixPak was installed. For example, Warp Server FixPaks include updates for the syslevel.req, syslevel.srv, syslevel.mug, and syslevel.upe components. 6.3. Committing to an Installed FixPak Level Fixtool also allows you to COMMIT the present system (with FixPaks applied) to be your "base" system. The COMMIT process makes your current system appear to be the archive level. When you COMMIT a product to a FixPak level, FixTool destroys all references to your ARCHIVE and/or BACKUP directories. It does NOT, however, delete the ARCHIVE directory because other products may be pointing to the same directory for their archives. If your system is not sharing its ARCHIVE directory with any other systems, you can delete the ARCHIVE directory. You will have to use the following before deleting the files to take off the read-only attribute: attrib -r *.* The COMMIT process allows you to free up disk space used by the ARCHIVE directory, but it also removes the ability to restore the product to initial archive level. You might want to do this if your system is stable and you do not want to return to the actual installed version for some reason. For example, if you have applied a Year 2000 FixPak and your system is stable, you could COMMIT to that FixPak level before applying any future FixPaks. In this way, if you need to backout to archive level, you do not have to re-install the Year 2000 FixPak. Backing out to the ARCHIVE directory would actually back out to the stable Year 2000 FixPak level. To COMMIT a FixPak with FSERVICE, see Section 8. To COMMIT to a certain FixPak level using SERVICE, do the following: 1. Select the "Change product list..." button from the initial panel. 2. Select the "Uncommitted products" radio button to display a list of all products that have a valid ARCHIVE or BACKUP directory associated with them. 3. In the Uncommitted Products window, de-select any products that you do not want to commit to their current level, and then click on the Commit button. 4. When the Commit Service window is displayed, you can view the product list, archive level, and backup level, and then select OK if you are ready to commit the products listed in the window to the levels shown. Since the COMMIT process removes the archive reference to the installed system, you may safely delete the ARCHIVE directory if no other machine is using it. If you do not delete it and re-use the same directory name for your next FixPak install, name collisions will occur. The FixTool will handle this properly, but it will take more processing time. Also, you will be wasting disk space with the old files still in the ARCHIVE directory. 6.4. Restoring an Individual File from the ARCHIVE or BACKUP Directory If you should find the need to restore a file to a prior level, you can do this manually by locating the old file in either the ARCHIVE or BACKUP directory. The old file name will be the same as the new one with an underscore as the last character in the extension or with all underscores for the extension if there is no extension on the original filename. If there is already a file with this name in the ARCHIVE or BACKUP directory, then FixTool replaces the last character of the name with a number, starting with a 1. For example, PMMERGE.DL_ would be changed to PMMERG1.DL_ if there's a name collision. After locating the file you wish to restore, you can unpack the file in either the ARCHIVE or BACKUP directory with the following command: UNPACK filename.ex_ This unpacks the file to the same directory. If the file is not locked, you can copy the file to the location desired and reboot. If it is locked, the copy will fail, and you'll need to boot to an alternate boot source and then copy the file over and reboot. This is normally done when you believe that a regression has occurred and the older file works better on your system than the one included in the FixPak. ****************************************************************************** Section 7. How to Set Up the FixTool for Remote Installation To speed up FixPak installation or to setup a FixPak on a LAN drive for use by others (Redirected Install), follow these steps. Before you begin, it is recommended that you install a Virtual Floppy Disk program such as SVDISK (Super Virtual Disk) or VFDISK (Virtual Floppy Disk). In the following examples, d: is the working drive and j: is the Virtual Floppy drive. Replace this with the drive letters you use. Also in these examples, XR_W035 is the FixPak name. First, setup a directory to hold the FixTool code. For example, run the following to place the FixTool into the d:\csf directory. | cs_143.exe d:\csf Next, setup the FixPak directory using the diskette images. loaddskf xr_w035.1dk j: /f/y/q xcopy j: d:\xr_w035\ /h/o/t/s/e/r/v loaddskf xr_w035.2dk j: /f/y/q xcopy j: d:\xr_w035\ /h/o/t/s/e/r/v ... ... ... <repeat for each disk image in the FixPak> Install the FixPak by running service.exe. set csfutilpath=d:\csf set csfcdromdir=d:\xr_w035 d: cd csf service (or start service) You can also apply service by running fservice.exe with a response file. d: cd csf fservice /r:d:\csf\response.wp3 /s:d:\xr_w035 This will apply the FixPak to all serviceable partitions. If you want to make the response file specific to a partition (drive) then you need to change the :SYSLEVEL and :ARCHIVE lines in response.wp3: :SYSLEVEL \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVE -- should be changed to -- :SYSLEVEL x:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE x:\ARCHIVE where x: is the drive you want serviced. ****************************************************************************** Section 8. How to Customize the Response File There are three standard response files included with the FixTool that can be modified for your configuration needs. To modify a response file, copy one of the standard response files (RESPONSE.WP3, RESPONSE.WP4, or RESPONSE.LAN) to a file called RESPONSE.FIL. Modify the RESPONSE.FIL as needed, and then run FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL. The following sections show a few of the service actions you can take through a response file. For more information about response files, view the README.INF file that comes with the FixTool. 8.1. Applying Service to a Product Without an Existing Archive This response file can be used to apply service for the first time using FSERVICE when there is no existing archive of the product being serviced. It will service all partitions and place an archive in each partition. It does not take a backup of changed files. In this case, the SERVICE.LOG file will go into the C:\OS2\INSTALL directory. Files that are read-only, hidden, or system files will be replaced automatically during service. The FixPak source files are on A:. The FixTool will service all partitions where \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 and \MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM are found, and it will save the original files in an \ARCHIVE directory for each partition serviced. Note that the :LOGFILE tag is optional and may be overridden by using the /L: parameter on the FSERVICE command line. The :FLAGS and :SOURCE tags are also optional, but if used, the :SERVICE tag must be included. The :SOURCE tag can be overridden by using the /S: parameter on the FSERVICE command line. You should include a :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, and :ARCHIVE tag for each product to be serviced. Note that the :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, and :ARCHIVE tags must appear in the order shown in this example. The REPLACE_NEWER flag can be added to the :FLAGS line as shown here: :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED REPLACE_NEWER This flag will replace files automatically instead of giving a pop-up panel that questions whether you want to replace a file that is newer on the system with an older version from the FixPak. Warning: Using the REPLACE_NEWER flag may cause files to be back-leveled. Be sure that you know it is okay to replace the files that are newer before you use this flag. This flag was included in the previous default response files for OS/2 Warp 3, but has been deleted because it allows you to back-level files unintentionally. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED :SOURCE A:\ :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVE :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL \MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVEM For OS/2 Warp 4 systems, the multimedia lines are not needed in the response file. So, the last three lines in the previous example should be removed or commented out of the response file for OS/2 Warp 4.0. 8.2. Applying Service to a Product With an Existing Archive This response file can be used to apply service using FSERVICE when there is an existing archive of the product being serviced. This demonstrates the ability to take a backup of changed files. Notice that each product serviced must be backed up to a different directory, so the drive must be explicitly defined in the :SYSLEVEL, :ARCHIVE, and :BACKUP lines. Also note the order of the :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, :ARCHIVE, and :BACKUP tags. These tags must appear in this order. The :BACKUP tag is optional. The REPLACE_NEWER flag can be added to the :FLAGS line as shown here: :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED REPLACE_NEWER This flag will replace files automatically instead of giving a pop-up panel that questions whether you want to replace a file that is newer on the system with an older version from the FixPak. Warning: Using the REPLACE_NEWER flag may cause files to be back-leveled. Be sure that you know it is okay to replace the files that are newer before you use this flag. This flag was included in the previous default response files for OS/2 Warp 3, but has been deleted because it allows you to back-level files unintentionally. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED :SOURCE A:\ :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE C:\ARCHIVE :BACKUP C:\BACKUP :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE C:\ARCHIVEM :BACKUP C:\BACKUPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, the last four lines are not needed in the response file. 8.3. Backing Out to the Archive Level of a Product This is a sample response file to be used when backing out to the archive level of a product. Note that you can only use one :TARGET tag in the response file. Also note that the :TARGET tag must appear before a :BACKOUT tag is used. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :SOURCE A:\ :TARGET ARCHIVE :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, you do not need to include the last two lines of this example in your response file. 8.4. Backing Out to the Backup Level of a Product This is a sample response file to be used when backing out to the backup level of a product. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :SOURCE A:\ :TARGET BACKUP :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, you do not need to include the last two lines of this example in your response file. 8.5. Committing a Product This is a sample response file to be used when committing a product. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :SOURCE A:\ :COMMIT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :COMMIT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, do not include the last two lines of this example in your response file. 8.6. Redirecting an Archive of a Product to Another Existing Archive This is a sample response file to be used when redirecting an archive of a product to another existing archive location. One example of this would be for using a shared network archive. Note that the archive directory specifies the location of an existing archive to which the current product is being redirected. In this example the arbitrary drive shows S:, which may be a LAN drive. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :SOURCE A:\ :REDIRECT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE S:\ARCHIVE :REDIRECT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE S:\ARCHIVEM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, do not include the last three lines of this example in your response file. ****************************************************************************** Section 9. How to Turn Off Archiving for a FixPak With FixTool 1.40 and later, a new utility called ARCHCTL.CMD is included. This utility allows you to turn off the archiving feature of a FixPak. This is especially useful if you have already tested a FixPak in a controlled environment and are convinced that there will be no need to backout the FixPak to an original product level. With archiving turned off, you may include a backup directory and backup to your previous level if desired. But you will not be able to back up more than one level. For example, if you install OS/2 Base FixPak 8 with archiving turned off and include a backup directory, then when you install FixPak 9, the backup directory for FixPak 8 is deleted. If you do not include a backup directory with archiving turned off, there is no way to back up to a previous level. The syntax for the ARCHCTL utility is as follows: ARCHCTL ON|OFF fixpak_source where ON|OFF indicates the action to perform. ON enables archiving; OFF disables it. fixpak_source is normally the drive with the first FixPak diskette, but it can also be the root of the FixPak when copied to the hard disk (where the \FIX subdirectory is located). The default for OS/2 FixPaks is ON. The default for LAN FixPaks is OFF. Examples for turning archiving OFF: Example 1. 1. Place first FixPak diskette in A: 2. Enter ARCHCTL OFF A: Example 2. 1. XCOPY all FixPak diskette data to N:\FIXES\FP32 2. Enter ARCHCTL OFF N:\FIXES\FP32 Examples for turning archiving ON: Example 3. 1. Place first FixPak diskette in A: 2. Enter ARCHCTL ON A: Example 4. 1. XCOPY all FixPak diskette data to N:\FIXES\FP32 2. Enter ARCHCTL ON N:\FIXES\FP32 ****************************************************************************** Section 10. Setting Environment Variables There are several SET statements that set environment variables for the FixTool to use. See the table below for a list of these variables and a description of what they do. Environment Variable Usage ------------------------------- ----------------------------------- SET CSFUTILPATH=path Allows you to run SERVICE or FSERVICE from your hard drive or from a redirected drive. SET CSFCDROMDIR=path Allows you to install a FixPak from a redirected drive or CD-ROM. All of the FixPak files should be in this path. This path should NOT be pointing to a floppy (or virtual floppy) drive. SET REMOTE_INSTALL_STATE=0|1 If this variable is set to 0, then upon termination FixTool returns control to the calling process. SET CSFDRIVEAPPLY=d Allows you to restrict service to products found only on drive d and on the boot drive. SET CSFTIMESTAMP=1 Adds a timestamp to each line of the SERVICE.LOG file. SET CSFSTAGEDRIVE=d Allows you to determine where the locked files will be temporarily stored. d is the drive on which to put the locked files. SET CSFSKIPCRC=1 Allows you to skip the CRC checking of the FixPak files. Be careful to use this only if necessary. The CRC check identifies bad media and prevents potential problems. ****************************************************************************** Section 11. If You Have a Problem If the FixPak does not install properly, there are files you can look in to find out what error occurred. The SERVICE.LOG file is the first place to look. The FixTool puts it in the x:\OS2\INSTALL directory where x: is the OS/2 boot drive. If the FixTool is unable to complete processing successfully, then the next time you use the FixTool, it will try to recover, picking up from where it stopped previously. It uses information from C:\FIXSTART to recover. You may also notice a directory $CSFTMP$ on a drive that had the largest amount of free space available when the FixTool last started. It is safe to delete this directory and any files in it any time the FixTool is not running. This directory is recreated on the drive with the most free space available whenever starting the FixTool. Due to system usage and drive space changes, it may not be the same drive each time for this directory. ****************************************************************************** Section 12. Common Error Messages Here are some common error messages that you may receive when running SERVICE. - Error message: An error occurred while searching for files to update. The reason may be old or corrupt CSF logfiles, CSF_SEL.000 file, or file system corruption. See README file for more information. Explanation #1: You may get this if you have used the new FixTool (version 1.38 or later) to install a FixPak, and then try to use an old version of the FixTool (version 1.37B or earlier). Solution #1: If you are installing a LAN FixPak, you can delete all the LOGF0000.xxx and LOGSTART.xxx files on your system, and reapply the FixPak. If you are installing an OS/2 FixPak, you will also need to copy your original SYSLEVEL.OS2 file back into the \OS2\INSTALL directory. Explanation #2: You may also get this error if you are trying to service a system that has many syslevel files (over about 150) on all drives. Solution #2: If your system has a large number of syslevel files, you may have to limit the search for products to be serviced by using the following set statement before you run SERVICE: SET CSFDRIVEAPPLY=d where d is the drive you wish to service. This statement limits the search for serviceable products to one drive at a time in addition to the boot drive. This will get the number of files opened down to a workable level. - Error message: No products were found on the target system to service. Explanation #1: Your SYSLEVEL.xxx file does not contain the proper prerequisite FixPak number or product information. In order to install a FixPak, the number of the FixPak must be higher than the number of the current CSD in the SYSLEVEL.xxx file, or the product information must match. Solution #1: Check the prerequisites needed for the FixPak you are trying to install. Some FixPaks have a particular FixPak that must be installed prior to installing that FixPak. Also, make sure that the FixPak you are trying to install is one that may be applied to that product. If the product information is incorrect, you may need to copy the product SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media. Explanation #2: If you have committed an OS/2 base FixPak with Version 1.38 or Version 1.39, you may get this message when you try to install another FixPak. Solution #2: Copy the product's SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media or from a backup copy that was made prior to committing the FixPak. - Error message: The path <path\filename> does not exist or is invalid. Explanation: FixTool could not unpack the file specified in the message, or it could not unpack the file just prior to the file specified in the message. Solution: This indicates that the FixPak media is bad. You should download the FixPak again, re-create the FixPak diskettes, and then re-install the FixPak. The FixTool will resume, starting at the point where it stopped. If you get RC=109 in the service.log, the file listed prior to the first RC=109 is probably giving an unpack error. The modules that received the 109 error were not updated properly. Make sure that you are using the UNPACK2.EXE that comes with this version of the FixTool. You should also download the FixPak again and re-create the FixPak diskettes. Then reinstall the FixPak from the new media. The FixTool will resume, updating any files that were not originally updated. If this does not fix the problem, please contact your service representative. - Error message: Error reading file <path>\IBMCSFLK.DLL. Explanation: FixTool could not find the files needed for servicing. Solution: Make sure that you've set the CSFUTILPATH and CSFCDROMDIR environment variables if you're running service from a hard drive. The CSFUTILPATH should point to the directory that contains the FixTool files (SERVICE.EXE, FSERVICE.EXE, etc.), and CSFCDROMDIR should point to the directory that contains the FixPak files (with the FIX directory). Also make sure that all the files listed in Section 2 are in your FixTool file directory. - Error message: No source drive is available. Explanation: The FixTool first checks for removable drives on the system. If there are no removable drives, you will get this error message if you have not set the CSFCDROMDIR to point to a valid hard drive or LAN drive. Solution: Set the CSFCDROMDIR to point to the drive and directory that contain the FixPak files. - Error message: Checksum error in <file>. Explanation: The FixTool checks the checksum of the source media with a checksum that was recorded when the FixPak was created. If these values do not match, you will receive this error. Solution: This indicates that the FixPak media is bad. Download the FixPak again and re-create the FixPak diskettes, or get another FixPak CD. Then reinstall the FixPak. The FixTool will resume, starting at the point where it stopped. - Error message: The path SET CSFCDROMDIR=<path\filename> does not exist or is invalid. Explanation: FixTool could not find the FIX directory in the path given in the SET CSFCDROMDIR statement. Solution: Check to make sure the path given in the SET CSFCDROMDIR statement is pointing to the directory that contains the FixPak. This directory should contain all the files and directories included in the FixPak. Here are some common error messages that you might see when running FSERVICE. - Error message: CSF257: No product has been selected. Explanation: This error message is reported in several situations. You may not have selected a product to service in the RESPONSE.FIL, or FSERVICE may not have found any products to service. If FSERVICE didn't find any products to service, either the product information on the system did not match the product information in the FixPak, or FSERVICE determined that the FixPak would back-level the system. Solution: Check the prerequisites for the FixPak and make sure that the system contains the proper pre-requisites. Also, be sure that the FixPak you are trying to install is being applied to the appropriate product. If the product information is incorrect, you may need to copy the product SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media. - Error message: This portion of service has completed. Reboot your system before applying additional service or using the product to process files that were locked during service. Explanation: This appears as a red screen with a title of "Corrective Service Facility Fatal Error," but the message may not indicate an error. Please view the service.log file by pressing Enter. This screen appears after doing a backout with FSERVICE so that you can check the log file to make sure there are no errors before you reboot your system. Solution: Make sure that there are no errors logged and then press Ctrl-Break to exit service. If there were no errors in the log file, then FSERVICE completed successfully and it's safe to reboot your system. - Error message: Error reading file <path>\IBMCSFLK.DLL. Explanation: FixTool could not find the files needed for servicing. Solution: Make sure that all the files listed in Section 2 are in the directory (or on the diskette) with the FixTool files. Also, make sure your /S: parameter path is valid. It should contain the FixPak files with the FIX directory. Sometimes you may need to include the /S: parameter--even if you have set SOURCE properly in the response file. ****************************************************************************** Section 13. Other Known Problems The following problems have also been encountered: - When using SERVICE, one of the panels contains a Reboot button that no longer is needed. This button was used when you wanted to reboot from the CSF boot diskettes, but the CSF boot diskettes are no longer available. You should select Continue, or you can select Cancel and reboot the system using boot diskettes for that product. - BOOTOS2 induced problem. BOOTOS2 (corrected in latest version) copied the SYSLEVEL.OS2 file from the booted partition which was used to create the BOOTOS2 partition to the new partition. This SYSLEVEL.OS2 file could have had default service directories that included drive letters in it. Since BOOTOS2 copied the file to a different partition, the wrong drive letter would be specified for the FixTool to use when looking for files to be serviced. The SYSLEVEL.OS2 normally would have default directories in it after one had applied service to a partition, or possibly after the system install. The net result here is that if you had a SYSLEVEL.OS2 file with default directories in it, then created a BOOTOS2 partition, and later tried to service the BOOTOS2 partition, the FixTool not only would apply service to the BOOTOS2 partition, but the default directories in the SYSLEVEL.OS2 file as well (the partition where the SYSLEVEL.OS2 came from). The solution here is to copy the SYSLEVEL.OS2 from your distribution diskette or CD into OS2\INSTALL directory of the BOOTOS2 partition before applying service to that partition. - A trap can occur if you include an unformatted drive for the archive directory. This occurs even if you format the drive in a different session before the FixTool processes any files for archiving. This happens because the FixTool scans for formatted drives at the beginning of the program and creates a list of possible drives, which is not added to during subsequent processing. The solution is to make sure that you have a valid, formatted drive given for the ARCHIVE directory BEFORE the FixTool starts. If not, you must stop and then restart the FixTool once the drive is valid. | - If your drive C: is formatted with FAT32, you may get the following error message: "An error occurred. The reason may be old or corrupt CSF logfiles, CSF_SEL.000 file, or file system corruption." This is a general error message that's returned when an unexpected return code is encountered. The error is sent because the FixTool searches for the FIXSTART file on C:, and therefore needs a C: partition that contains data it can read, such as FAT or HPFS. The solution is to create a dummy C: partition that's formatted FAT or HPFS. Try to boot to that C: partition (which will fail, but allows it to remain the active C: partition). Then boot OS/2 and install the FixPak. Finally, boot to the other C: partition, which will make it the default C: drive. ****************************************************************************** Section 14. List of Changes Made for Each Version (1.38 and Later) This section gives a description of what changes have been made for the new versions of the FixTool (Version 1.38 and later). | NOTE: FixTool 1.43 and FixTool 1.37B are the only supported FixTools. | FixTool 1.43 supersedes all FixTools. FixTool 1.37B can continue to be used only on FixPaks that it was released with. | All other FixPaks should use FixTool 1.43. | Changes Made in Version 1.43 | - Added support for applying Warp Server for e-business and Base Device | Driver FixPaks using FPINST.CMD | - Fixed a code problem dealing with resources inside the FixTool. | This resource problem could make the FixTool hang under certain | circumstances and make application of a FixPak difficult to | complete. | - Fixed a problem with DBCS FixPak installations on Warp Server for | e-business SMP machines. Changes Made in Version 1.42 - Added processing to detect the drive that VoiceType, Security, and OpenDoc are installed on. These can now be serviced without the USERDIRS.OS2 file. - Changed the way forced locked files are processed. RIPL tree files will no longer be force locked, and WIN-OS/2 files on a drive other than the boot drive may be force locked. - A config.sys file of 0 bytes will no longer be created on drives being serviced that do not contain a config.sys file. - The base device driver FixPak will be processed as an OS/2 product instead of a LAN product. - ABIOSless machines with RAM-loaded ABIOS will be properly detected. - Added backup/backout response file information to RESPONSE.LAN file. - Modified Fixtool to work with DBCS OS/2 base operating system FixPaks, with a pre-requisite of FX00505 for OS/2 Warp 4 and WX03807 for OS/2 Warp 3. - Can now rejoin large files that have been split across diskettes. - OS2KRNL, OS2LDR, and OS2BOOT files will only be given SYSTEM / HIDDEN attributes in the root directory. If these files are serviced in other directories, they will not be made into SYSTEM / HIDDEN files. Changes Made in Version 1.41 - Added the ability to include a timestamp in the SERVICE.LOG file. - Enhanced the performance when installing from diskettes. - Copy packed files to a temporary directory on the hard drive and then run checksum and unpack against the files on the temporary directory. An additional 1.1 MB is required for this processing. The drive used for this is the one with the most available space. - Fixed error that occurred when C: is the CD-ROM drive. CSF_SEL.000 and FIXSTART will be written to the first non-removable, non-network drive on the system. - Changed Backout routine so that any CSBKExxx.EXE exit routines will run last, after the syslevel files are updated and the files are backed out. - Updated FILEFIX.DLL to detect invalid release numbers. These must be between 1 and 255. Also, this file was updated to not return a mismatch when the file versions are the same. Changes Made in Version 1.40 - Fixes a commit problem introduced with FixTool 1.38. If you committed an OS/2 base FixPak with Version 1.38 or 1.39, you cannot install subsequent FixPaks without reverting to a SYSLEVEL.OS2 file used prior to the commit (you can use the SYSLEVEL.OS2 that was shipped with the product from the product diskettes/CD). After you had done a commit, applied a FP to the committed base, and then either restored from the commit Archive or backed out an installed FP, the fact that the base was at a specific FixPak level was lost. The FixTool will now create in OS2\INSTALL a file named FPCOMMIT.OS2 to hold the base committed SYSLEVEL. This will be restored to SYSLEVEL.OS2 during either of these 2 restore activities. Do not erase this file. - Eliminates a SYS0039 error when using SERVICE without a diskette in the drive when starting the FixTool. - Allows you to set a new CSFDRIVEAPPLY environment variable prior to running SERVICE which will limit the search for products to be serviced to the drive given in the set statement and to the boot drive. - Includes an updated FPINST.CMD file that uses the /B: parameter for LAN-related FixPak installations. - Includes an updated UNPACK2.EXE and updated error handling for messages coming from UNPACK2.EXE. - Includes checksum verification on the source media. This fix prevents corrupted source files from being transferred to the target system. You may also notice a slight increase in the time it takes to process files to be updated. - Includes an ARCHCTL utility that allows you to turn off archive processing for a particular FixPak. Changes Made in Version 1.39 - Works with OS/2 Warp v3.0 and LAN-related FixPaks. The backout- to-backup process was fixed for LAN-related FixPaks. - The CSFUTILPATH environment variable does not have to be set to be able to run SERVICE from a hard drive. - Now services systems that do not have a removable media drive. - Contains an updated response file for Warp 4 systems. Changes Made in Version 1.38 NOTE: Version 1.38 of the FixTool was for use with OS/2 Warp v4.0 systems only. - Updates the CSD level in the SYSLEVEL.xxx file for all products. The CSD level is updated to match the FixPak number. - Recognizes Software Choice installed features. When backing out a FixPak, you will be given a chance to cancel the backout if a Software Choice installed feature will be broken by the FixPak backout. - No longer uses CSF boot diskettes. The FixTool now comes as a self-extracting zip file that can be unzipped to a single diskette. - Places the locked file device driver statements closer to the beginning of the CONFIG.SYS. - Corrects a problem with the backout-to-backup process when a file is serviced in more than one directory.
 service.boulder.ibm.com/ps/products/os2/fixtool/english-us/cs_143.exe
Corrective Service facility v. 2-B 1.42 (5/4/2000) Readme/What's new
Readme for Corrective Service Facility 2-B Version 1.42 **************************** NOTE: Change bars (|) included to the left of the text indicate that this line has changed or been added since the last READ.ME update. | This readme file describes the features available with Version 1.42 of the Corrective Service Facility (referred to in this document as the FixTool). Once you use this version of the FixTool to service a product, you will not be able to use Version 1.37B or earlier. SYSLEVEL files are modified by FixTool 1.38 and later, causing FixTool 1.37B or earlier not to find products to service. This document supplements the information given in the README.INF that comes with the FixTool. The README.INF includes more details about the FixTool process. | For more information, the following URL contains a very thorough and useful | document called OS/2 FixPak Primer. It was written by Frank McKenney, an | independent OS/2 consultant. | | http://ps.software.ibm.com/pbin-usa-ps/getobj.pl?/pdocs-usa/fp.html | CONTENTS: Section 1. How to Use the FixTool EXE (Zip) File Section 2. Files Included in the FixTool EXE File Section 3. How to Tell What FixTool Version You Have Section 4. Basic Installation for First-Time FixPak Users Section 5. Other Ways to Apply Service | Section 6. Information about ARCHIVE, BACKUP, and COMMIT Section 7. How to Set Up the FixTool for Remote Installation Section 8. How to Customize the Response File Section 9. How to Turn Off Archiving for a FixPak Section 10. Setting Environment Variables Section 11. If You Have a Problem Section 12. Common Error Messages Section 13. Other Known Problems Section 14. List of Changes Made for Each Version (1.38 and Later) ****************************************************************************** Section 1. How to Use the FixTool EXE (Zip) File First, unzip the FixTool zip file onto a diskette or into a directory. You can do this by copying the self-extracting zip file into a new subdirectory and then use the following commands from an OS/2 command prompt: <d>: cd <directory> | CSx142 <target> where <d> is the drive that you've put the FixTool zip file on, <directory> is the directory that you've copied the self-extracting zip file to. x Country code, where '_' is the US country code. Other NLV country codes are identical to the Country code used in FixPak's. <target> is the fully qualified path where the file is to be unzipped to. If <target> is not a diskette, you can also copy all the files in <target> | onto a diskette, except for CSx142.EXE if you wish. Next, you need OS/2 boot capability. For this, you can use any of the following: - boot the install diskettes for the product you're servicing - create utility diskettes from your system and boot these - use a maintenance partition if you have one - boot through Alt-F1 and go to the command prompt - boot OS/2 as usual and then open an OS/2 session ****************************************************************************** Section 2. Files Included in the FixTool EXE File The following files are included in the FixTool EXE (Zip) file: File Use -------------- ----------------------------------------------------------- BUILD.LVL Contains build information for this FixTool release. CSFPANS.DLL Used by FSERVICE | SERVICE.EXE Executable for applying service through a windowed session SERVICE.HLP SERVICE help file SHPIINST.DLL FixTool required DLL UNPACK.EXE Used to unpack files being serviced UNPACK2.EXE Used to unpack files being serviced VIOCALLS.DLL FixTool required DLL | FSERVICE.EXE Executable for applying service through a command line (used with a response file). IBMCSFLK.DLL Locked file device driver file IBMCSFLK.EXE Locked file device driver file IBMCSFLK.SYS Locked file device driver file IBMCSFLK.MSG Locked file device driver file PACK.EXE Used to pack files being archived or backed up README.INF General Installation instructions for the FixTool | RESPONSE.LAN Response file for servicing network-related products RESPONSE.WP3 Response file for servicing OS/2 Warp v3 base RESPONSE.WP4 Response file for servicing OS/2 Warp v4 base FSERVICE.MSG FSERVICE message file FPINST.CMD Command file for applying service through FSERVICE (uses standard response files for OS/2 Warp 3, OS/2 Warp 4, and network-related FixPaks) NLS.DLL FixTool required DLL MSG.DLL FixTool required DLL | FILEFIX.DLL FixTool required DLL ARCHCTL.CMD Command file that allows you to turn off archiving for a particular FixPak. | READ.ME This file ****************************************************************************** Section 3. How to Tell What FixTool Version You Have | You can tell if you have Version 1.42 by running BLDLEVEL on SERVICE.EXE or FSERVICE.EXE. You will see one of the following, depending on which version of BLDLEVEL.EXE you have. | Signature: @#IBM:F.142#@ OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 Vendor: IBM | Revision: 0.142 | File Version: 0.142 Description: OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 | Signature: @#IBM:F.142#@ OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 Vendor: IBM | Revision: F.142 Description: OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 The new version of the FixTool (Corrective Service Facility) updates the current CSD field in the SYSLEVEL files of the products it services. After | applying a FixPak with Version 1.42, you will be able to run SYSLEVEL and tell what FixPaks you have applied by looking at the current field of the product's SYSLEVEL file. This version is also compatible with Software Choice features. If you need to use Software Choice to install new features for a product, the FixTool will integrate SYSLEVEL and archive information from the Software Choice install the next time it services that product. ****************************************************************************** Section 4. Basic Installation for First-Time FixPak Users This is a very basic set of instructions to help you install an OS/2 Warp FixPak; it contains installation tips from OS/2 support technicians. This document is designed to help you understand how to prepare your system and then install an OS/2 Warp base FixPak. It is important that you also read the README file supplied with the FixPak you are installing. This document only discusses local FixPak installations from diskettes using | the Corrective Service Facility (CSF) FixTool 1.42. For other methods of installation see Section 5. Before you can begin the FixPak installation, either obtain the FixPak diskettes from IBM, or download the FixPak and run LOADDSKF.EXE to convert the downloaded FixPak images into a usable diskette format. Note: LOADDSKF.EXE can be found on the OS/2 Warp installation CD in the DISKIMGS directory. 4.1. Prerequisites: 4.1.1. You must have at least 70 megabytes of free space available on your hard drive. At least 20 MB of the 70 MB must be available on the C: drive if installing to another partition. To determine how much free space is available, open an OS/2 Command Prompt window and type CHKDSK; then press Enter. CHKDSK will search the disk and report its findings, including the number of kilobytes available for use. This number must exceed 70000 kilobytes. 4.1.2. You must create utility diskettes. These diskettes will allow you to boot to a command prompt and perform various utility maintenance jobs on your computer to prepare it for the FixPak install as well as to help recover from some minor problems. 4.1.2.1. How to create utility diskettes: Note: Before you begin, you must have three blank diskettes and the installation CD for OS/2 Warp 3 or Warp Server, or four blank diskettes and the installation CD for OS/2 Warp 4. a. From the desktop, click on the OS/2 System icon, b. Click on the System Setup icon, c. Click on the Create Utility Diskettes icon. d. Follow the prompts to label, insert and remove the diskettes. 4.1.3. Run CHKDSK. The computer must be running well before you install a FixPak. If you are experiencing any problems with your machine, please contact your technical support representative to get the machine fixed. Even if your machine is running well, it is a good idea to run CHKDSK; it may find and fix some unknown problems. 4.1.3.1 To run CHKDSK: a. Shut down the computer. b. Insert Utility Diskette 1 in drive A: and restart the computer. c. Replace the diskettes as prompted, until you reach an A:\ prompt. d. Insert the last utility diskette (Utility Diskette 3 for OS/2 Warp 3, Utility Diskette 4 for OS/2 Warp 4). e. At the A:\ prompt, type CHKDSK C: /F, then press Enter. CHKDSK will search the disk and attempt to fix any problems. f. If CHKDSK reports any problems, record the errors, then rerun CHKDSK to verify that the problems were actually fixed. 4.1.4. DO NOT USE YOUR SYSTEM Once you begin a FixPak installation, do not try to use your system for any other purpose. Unexpected problems may arise, causing the FixPak installation to fail. 4.1.5. Record Your Current Revision Level Number. Before beginning the FixPak installation, verify the current version and revision level of the operating system, as follows: Open an OS/2 Command Prompt window, and type VER /R, then press Enter. Record the information displayed; for example: The Operating System/2 Version is 4.00 Revision 9.030 Once you have completed the FixPak installation, you can verify that the revision number has been properly updated. 4.1.6. UNDERSTAND ALL THE WORDS If there are any words, phases or instructions in this document that you do not understand or if you do not know their meaning, please contact your local support representative for an explanation. Once you have successfully completed all of the above steps, and are satisfied that your system is in good working order and ready to begin, proceed to the instructions below. If you have any questions or concerns, contact you computer support adminstrator and address them before continuing. 4.2. Basic Installation Instructions There are several ways to install a FixPak; this section of the readme uses the FPINST procedure. 1. Shutdown your computer. 2. Insert Utility Diskette 1 in the diskette drive and restart the computer, either by turning on the power, or pressing the Ctrl+Alt+Del keys. 3. As prompted, remove and insert utility diskettes until you come to an A:\ prompt. 4. Remove the current utility diskette, and insert the last of the series (Utility Diskette 3 for OS/2 Warp 3, or Utility Diskette 4 for OS/2 Warp 4). 5. Type CHKDSK C: /F then press Enter. This will run the CHKDSK program. Review the reported findings. Look for any recognizable problems and fix them. Note: If CHKDSK does detect problems, run the command again, to verify that the problems were really fixed. If CHKDSK continues to find problems and is unable to fix them, please contact your local support representative to resolve the problems before continuing with the FixPak installation. 6. As mentioned in Section 2.1 above, CHKDSK also reports the amount of free space remaining. If you have at least 70 MB free (70000 Kilobytes or 70000000 Bytes) then you can proceed with the FixPak install. If not, you must delete or move enough files to meet the free space requirement before continuing. | 7. Insert the Corrective Service FixTool diskette (CSF FIXT 142). 8. At the command prompt, enter one of the following commands and then press Enter. For an OS/2 Warp 3 or Warp Server Base FixPak: FPINST Warp3 For an OS/2 Warp 4 Base FixPak: FPINST Warp4 9. The FixPak installation program will perform a variety of functions. Note: Near the beginning of the FixPak installation, it may appear as if nothing is happening. Please be patient. The only other user action required will be to remove and insert diskettes as prompted. When the installation is complete, you will be informed and prompted to restart the computer. Do this by pressing Ctrl+Alt+Del, or by turning the power off and then back on. ****************************************************************************** Section 5. Other Ways to Apply Service Once you have boot capability (see Section 1) and are at a command prompt, you can apply service using one of the following methods: Using FPINST Using SERVICE Using FSERVICE with a custom RESPONSE.FIL Insert the FixTool diskette you created, or change to the directory that the FixTool is in, and then use FPINST or FSERVICE as described in Sections 5.1 and 5.3. To use SERVICE as described in Section 5.2, you must have OS/2 running without having booted from diskettes, maintenance partition, or via Alt-F1. 5.1. Using FPINST To use FPINST, change to the diskette or directory where you have FPINST.CMD and the related files, and type FPINST fixpak_type <boot_drive> where fixpak_type is WARP3 for OS/2 Warp Version 3.0 FixPak installs, WARP4 for OS/2 Warp Version 4.0 FixPak installs, or NETWORK for LAN or network-related FixPak installs, and <boot_drive> is an optional parameter that is only valid when fixpak_type is NETWORK. This is the boot drive of the system. This restricts the application of FixPaks to specific drives on systems where more than one OS/2 system is applied. FPINST uses FSERVICE with default response files. These default response files do the following: For OS/2 Base FixPaks, the default response file saves an archive copy of the files it services in <boot_drive>:\ARCHIVE. It does not keep a backup for files serviced, other than the archived files. If this is not the first OS/2 base FixPak installed and if you want to be able to backout to the previous FixPak level, you must modify the default response file. Also, the default response file does not automatically replace all files from the FixPak. The FixTool will prompt you to find out whether to replace any files on the system that appear to be newer than the files in the FixPak. This happens because the REPLACE_NEWER flag is not set in the default response file for OS/2 Warp v3 or v4. For LAN or network-related FixPaks, there will be no archives or backups kept by default, and the FixTool will service all partitions that contain the product being serviced by that FixPak. If you wish to restrict the drives serviced, you must modify the default response file. NOTE: If you need to install a FixPak with different options from the ones described above, then you must either modify the default response file or use SERVICE instead of FPINST. See Section 6 for information about how to modify a response file. See the next section for information about SERVICE. 5.2. Using SERVICE To use SERVICE, go to the diskette or directory where you have SERVICE.EXE and the related files. Then type SERVICE The program will prompt you for required inputs. See README.INF for more information about these panels. With FixTool Version 1.39 or later, the CSFUTILPATH defaults to the path that you have executed SERVICE from, so you do not need to set this environment variable if all the FixTool files are in the same directory with SERVICE.EXE. NOTE: To use SERVICE, you must have the OS/2 PM Shell running. You cannot run SERVICE if you have booted from install diskettes or if you pressed Alt-F1 to get to a command prompt. 5.3. Using FSERVICE To use FSERVICE from a diskette, copy your customized RESPONSE.FIL to the diskette with the FixTool files, then go to the diskette and type FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL If you have copied the FixTool files into a directory, you need to use the following command from the directory with FSERVICE.EXE and the related files (including your custom RESPONSE.FIL): FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL /S:<d>:\<directory> where <d> is the drive with the FixTool related files and <directory> is the directory structure where you put the FixTool files. There are optional parameters that can be included on the FSERVICE command line. See the README.INF file for more details about these parameters. You should use the /B:<drive> parameter with FSERVICE when applying LAN FixPaks on systems with more than one OS/2 boot partition. <drive> is the OS/2 boot partition to be serviced. ****************************************************************************** |Section 6. Information about ARCHIVE, BACKUP, and COMMIT | | The FixTool gives you the option to save existing files and restore your | system to a previous state in case the FixPak contains files that are not | compatible with your system. You may not need to restore your system, but | it is recommended that you keep a backup copy of your files in case you | encounter a problem after installing a FixPak. | | Depending on the FixPak type and on the state of the system you are | servicing, a FixPak allows you to save the following files: | | - an archive file only If this is the first FixPak installed | for this product and if archiving is | enabled for the FixPak | - an archive file and a backup file If archiving is enabled and if you | have already installed a FixPak for | this product | - a backup file only If archiving is disabled | | An archive file is the initial file that is installed with the product, | before any FixPaks have been applied. A backup file is the previous file | that was on the system before applying the current FixPak. | | OS/2 base FixPaks have archiving enabled. LAN, MPTS, and TCP/IP FixPaks | have archiving disabled. | |6.1. Keeping an Archive and/or Backup Copy of Files Serviced | | 6.1.1. ARCHIVE Directory | | When using SERVICE to install a FixPak, you will see a panel that | either allows you to enter the drive and path to the ARCHIVE directory, | or if you have previously installed a FixPak on this product, the | ARCHIVE directory will appear greyed out and you can enter a BACKUP | directory. (If archiving is disabled for this FixPak, you will not be | able to enter an ARCHIVE directory but will be able to enter a | BACKUP directory.) With FSERVICE, use the response file to specify the | ARCHIVE directory. See Section 8 for more information. | | Note that you specify the location of the ARCHIVE when you first install | a FixPak for a product, and this information is retained by the FixTool. | You will not be able to change it manually. Do not delete the archive | directory or any files in it unless you have done a COMMIT for that FixPak. | (See Section 6.3 for more information about COMMITing a FixPak.) | | The FixTool never deletes the ARCHIVE directory, even after a FixPak | is committed, because the ARCHIVE directory may be shared by more than | one system. | | If you have deleted the ARCHIVE directory and cannot install a FixPak | because FixTool cannot find the ARCHIVE directory, you should delete the | LOGF0000.xxx and LOGSTART.xxx files, where xxx is the 3-character | extension on the product's syslevel file. For example, LOGF0000.OS2 and | LOGSTART.OS2 should be deleted for OS/2 base FixPak installation. These | files are in the directory with the syslevel.xxx file. | | The ARCHIVE directory is very important. It allows you to restore your | system to the original installation level (or last committed level). | Each FixPak that's installed checks the files being replaced. If a file | is to be replaced and the original file is not in the ARCHIVE directory, | FixTool adds the original file to the ARCHIVE directory. | | 6.1.2. BACKUP Directory | | The BACKUP directory is handled very differently from the ARCHIVE directory. | It holds only the files that were updated by the last FixPak installation | for that product. The FixTool deletes the BACKUP directory for that product | with each new FixPak installation. Because of this, you can change the | location of the BACKUP directory with each FixPak if desired. | | When you restore your system to its BACKUP level, you are going back to | the files that were used before the LAST FixPak was applied. | | For FixPaks with archiving enabled, you will not be able to specify a | BACKUP directory for the first FixPak installed because the original files | go into the ARCHIVE directory instead of the BACKUP directory. In this | case, you can only specify an ARCHIVE directory. The second FixPak | installed and each FixPak after that will allow you to specify a BACKUP | directory. Be aware that the ARCHIVE directory is checked during FixPak | installation and it's possible that the same file may be in both | directories. | | Warning: If you re-install the same FixPak two times, the BACKUP | directory will contain only the files that were updated the second time | you installed the FixPak. In many cases, no files will be updated during | the second installation, and the BACKUP directory will be deleted, leaving | you no way to restore to BACKUP level. | |6.2. Recovering to a Backup or Archive Level | | With the presence of a valid ARCHIVE or BACKUP directory, you have some | recovery options if needed. You may either recover the system by using the | ARCHIVE directory, which will restore the system to the initial install | state, or by using the BACKUP directory, which will return the system to | the state before the last FixPak installation for that product. | | To recover, you can use either FSERVICE or SERVICE. For information about | recovering with FSERVICE, see Section 8. To use SERVICE, use the Backout | procedure as follows: | | 1. Select the "Change product list..." button from the initial panel. | | 2. Select the "Archived products" radio button to see the list of | products with a valid ARCHIVE directory. | | -OR- | | Select the "Backed up products" radio button to see the list of | products with a valid BACKUP directory. | | 3. De-select any products that appear on the list that you do not want | to restore to the archive or backup level. Then click on the Backout | button to begin the recovery process. | | 4. The syslevel files to be recovered will be listed in the Products | field and the level to which they will be backed out will appear in | the Target Level field, either ARCHIVE or BACKUP. Select OK to | restore to the target level. | | Warning: When backing out LAN FixPaks, be sure to select all the | syslevels for the components that were originally serviced | when the FixPak was installed. For example, Warp Server | FixPaks include updates for the syslevel.req, syslevel.srv, | syslevel.mug, and syslevel.upe components. | |6.3. Committing to an Installed FixPak Level | | Fixtool also allows you to COMMIT the present system (with FixPaks | applied) to be your "base" system. The COMMIT process makes your | current system appear to be the archive level. | | When you COMMIT a product to a FixPak level, FixTool destroys all | references to your ARCHIVE and/or BACKUP directories. It does NOT, | however, delete the ARCHIVE directory because other products may be | pointing to the same directory for their archives. If your system | is not sharing its ARCHIVE directory with any other systems, you can | delete the ARCHIVE directory. You will have to use the following | before deleting the files to take off the read-only attribute: | attrib -r *.* | | The COMMIT process allows you to free up disk space used by the ARCHIVE | directory, but it also removes the ability to restore the product to | initial archive level. | | You might want to do this if your system is stable and you do not | want to return to the actual installed version for some reason. | For example, if you have applied a Year 2000 FixPak and your system is | stable, you could COMMIT to that FixPak level before applying any | future FixPaks. In this way, if you need to backout to archive level, | you to not have to re-install the Year 2000 FixPak. Backing out to | the ARCHIVE directory would actually back out to the stable Year 2000 | FixPak level. | | To COMMIT a FixPak with FSERVICE, see Section 8. To COMMIT to a | certain FixPak level using SERVICE, do the following: | | 1. Select the "Change product list..." button from the initial panel. | | 2. Select the "Uncommitted products" radio button to display a list | of all products that have a valid ARCHIVE or BACKUP directory | associated with them. | 3. In the Uncommitted Products window, de-select any products that you | do not want to commit to their current level, and then click on the | Commit button. | 4. When the Commit Service window is displayed, you can view the | product list, archive level, and backup level, and then select OK | if you are ready to commit the products listed in the window to | the levels shown. | | Since the COMMIT process removes the archive reference to the installed | system, you may safely delete the ARCHIVE directory if no other machine | is using it. If you do not delete it and re-use the same directory name | for your next FixPak install, name collisions will occur. The FixTool | will handle this properly, but it will take more processing time. Also, | you will be wasting disk space with the old files still in the ARCHIVE | directory. | |6.4. Restoring an Individual File from the ARCHIVE or BACKUP Directory | | If you should find the need to restore a file to a prior level, you | can do this manually by locating the old file in either the ARCHIVE or | BACKUP directory. The old file name will be the same as the new one | with an underscore as the last character in the extension or with all | underscores for the extension if there is no extension on the original | filename. If there is already a file with this name in the ARCHIVE or | BACKUP directory, then FixTool replaces the last character of the name | with a number, starting with a 1. For example, PMMERGE.DL_ would be | changed to PMMERG1.DL_ if there's a name collision. | | After locating the file you wish to restore, you can unpack the file | in either the ARCHIVE or BACKUP directory with the following command: | UNPACK filename.ex_ | | This unpacks the file to the same directory. If the file is not locked, | you can copy the file to the location desired and reboot. If it is | locked, the copy will fail, and you'll need to boot to an alternate | boot source and then copy the file over and reboot. | | This is normally done when you believe that a regression has occurred | and the older file works better on your system than the one included | in the FixPak. | ****************************************************************************** Section 7. How to Set Up the FixTool for Remote Installation To speed up FixPak installation or to setup a FixPak on a LAN drive for use by others (Redirected Install), follow these steps. Before you begin, it is recommended that you install a Virtual Floppy Disk program such as SVDISK (Super Virtual Disk) or VFDISK (Virtual Floppy Disk). In the following examples, d: is the working drive and j: is the Virtual Floppy drive. Replace this with the drive letters you use. Also in these examples, XR_W035 is the FixPak name. First, setup a directory to hold the FixTool code. For example, run the following to place the FixTool into the d:\csf directory. | cs_142.exe d:\csf Next, setup the FixPak directory using the diskette images. loaddskf xr_w035.1dk j: /f/y/q xcopy j: d:\xr_w035\ /h/o/t/s/e/r/v loaddskf xr_w035.2dk j: /f/y/q xcopy j: d:\xr_w035\ /h/o/t/s/e/r/v ... ... ... <repeat for each disk image in the FixPak> Install the FixPak by running service.exe. set csfutilpath=d:\csf set csfcdromdir=d:\xr_w035 d: cd csf service (or start service) You can also apply service by running fservice.exe with a response file. d: cd csf fservice /r:d:\csf\response.wp3 /s:d:\xr_w035 This will apply the FixPak to all serviceable partitions. If you want to make the response file specific to a partition (drive) then you need to change the :SYSLEVEL and :ARCHIVE lines in response.wp3: :SYSLEVEL \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVE -- should be changed to -- :SYSLEVEL x:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE x:\ARCHIVE where x: is the drive you want serviced. ****************************************************************************** Section 8. How to Customize the Response File There are three standard response files included with the FixTool that can be modified for your configuration needs. To modify a response file, copy one of the standard response files (RESPONSE.WP3, RESPONSE.WP4, or RESPONSE.LAN) to a file called RESPONSE.FIL. Modify the RESPONSE.FIL as needed, and then run FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL. The following sections show a few of the service actions you can take through a response file. For more information about response files, view the README.INF file that comes with the FixTool. 8.1. Applying Service to a Product Without an Existing Archive This response file can be used to apply service for the first time using FSERVICE when there is no existing archive of the product being serviced. It will service all partitions and place an archive in each partition. It does not take a backup of changed files. In this case, the SERVICE.LOG file will go into the C:\OS2\INSTALL directory. Files that are read-only, hidden, or system files will be replaced automatically during service. The FixPak source files are on A:. The FixTool will service all partitions where \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 and \MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM are found, and it will save the original files in an \ARCHIVE directory for each partition serviced. Note that the :LOGFILE tag is optional and may be overridden by using the /L: parameter on the FSERVICE command line. The :FLAGS and :SOURCE tags are also optional, but if used, the :SERVICE tag must be included. The :SOURCE tag can be overridden by using the /S: parameter on the FSERVICE command line. You should include a :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, and :ARCHIVE tag for each product to be serviced. Note that the :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, and :ARCHIVE tags must appear in the order shown in this example. The REPLACE_NEWER flag can be added to the :FLAGS line as shown here: :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED REPLACE_NEWER This flag will replace files automatically instead of giving a pop-up panel that questions whether you want to replace a file that is newer on the system with an older version from the FixPak. Warning: Using the REPLACE_NEWER flag may cause files to be back-leveled. Be sure that you know it is okay to replace the files that are newer before you use this flag. This flag was included in the previous default response files for OS/2 Warp 3, but has been deleted because it allows you to back-level files unintentionally. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED :SOURCE A:\ :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVE :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL \MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVEM For OS/2 Warp 4 systems, the multimedia lines are not needed in the response file. So, the last three lines in the previous example should be removed or commented out of the response file for OS/2 Warp 4.0. 8.2. Applying Service to a Product With an Existing Archive This response file can be used to apply service using FSERVICE when there is an existing archive of the product being serviced. This demonstrates the ability to take a backup of changed files. Notice that each product serviced must be backed up to a different directory, so the drive must be explicitly defined in the :SYSLEVEL, :ARCHIVE, and :BACKUP lines. Also note the order of the :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, :ARCHIVE, and :BACKUP tags. These tags must appear in this order. The :BACKUP tag is optional. The REPLACE_NEWER flag can be added to the :FLAGS line as shown here: :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED REPLACE_NEWER This flag will replace files automatically instead of giving a pop-up panel that questions whether you want to replace a file that is newer on the system with an older version from the FixPak. Warning: Using the REPLACE_NEWER flag may cause files to be back-leveled. Be sure that you know it is okay to replace the files that are newer before you use this flag. This flag was included in the previous default response files for OS/2 Warp 3, but has been deleted because it allows you to back-level files unintentionally. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED :SOURCE A:\ :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE C:\ARCHIVE :BACKUP C:\BACKUP :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE C:\ARCHIVEM :BACKUP C:\BACKUPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, the last four lines are not needed in the response file. 8.3. Backing Out to the Archive Level of a Product This is a sample response file to be used when backing out to the archive level of a product. Note that you can only use one :TARGET tag in the response file. Also note that the :TARGET tag must appear before a :BACKOUT tag is used. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :SOURCE A:\ :TARGET ARCHIVE :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, you do not need to include the last two lines of this example in your response file. 8.4. Backing Out to the Backup Level of a Product This is a sample response file to be used when backing out to the backup level of a product. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :SOURCE A:\ :TARGET BACKUP :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, you do not need to include the last two lines of this example in your response file. 8.5. Committing a Product This is a sample response file to be used when committing a product. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :SOURCE A:\ :COMMIT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :COMMIT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, do not include the last two lines of this example in your response file. 8.6. Redirecting an Archive of a Product to Another Existing Archive This is a sample response file to be used when redirecting an archive of a product to another existing archive location. One example of this would be for using a shared network archive. Note that the archive directory specifies the location of an existing archive to which the current product is being redirected. In this example the arbitrary drive shows S:, which may be a LAN drive. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :SOURCE A:\ :REDIRECT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE S:\ARCHIVE :REDIRECT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE S:\ARCHIVEM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, do not include the last three lines of this example in your response file. ****************************************************************************** Section 9. How to Turn Off Archiving for a FixPak With FixTool 1.40 and later, a new utility called ARCHCTL.CMD is included. This utility allows you to turn off the archiving feature of a FixPak. This is especially useful if you have already tested a FixPak in a controlled environment and are convinced that there will be no need to backout the FixPak to an original product level. With archiving turned off, you may include a backup directory and backup to your previous level if desired. But you will not be able to back up more than one level. For example, if you install OS/2 Base FixPak 8 with archiving turned off and include a backup directory, then when you install FixPak 9, the backup directory for FixPak 8 is deleted. If you do not include a backup directory with archiving turned off, there is no way to back up to a previous level. The syntax for the ARCHCTL utility is as follows: ARCHCTL ON|OFF fixpak_source where ON|OFF indicates the action to perform. ON enables archiving; OFF disables it. fixpak_source is normally the drive with the first FixPak diskette, but it can also be the root of the FixPak when copied to the hard disk (where the \FIX subdirectory is located). The default for OS/2 FixPaks is ON. The default for LAN FixPaks is OFF. Examples for turning archiving OFF: Example 1. 1. Place first FixPak diskette in A: 2. Enter ARCHCTL OFF A: Example 2. 1. XCOPY all FixPak diskette data to N:\FIXES\FP32 2. Enter ARCHCTL OFF N:\FIXES\FP32 Examples for turning archiving ON: Example 3. 1. Place first FixPak diskette in A: 2. Enter ARCHCTL ON A: Example 4. 1. XCOPY all FixPak diskette data to N:\FIXES\FP32 2. Enter ARCHCTL ON N:\FIXES\FP32 ****************************************************************************** Section 10. Setting Environment Variables There are several SET statements that set environment variables for the FixTool to use. See the table below for a list of these variables and a description of what they do. Environment Variable Usage ------------------------------- ----------------------------------- SET CSFUTILPATH=path Allows you to run SERVICE or FSERVICE from your hard drive or from a redirected drive. SET CSFCDROMDIR=path Allows you to install a FixPak from a redirected drive or CD-ROM. All of the FixPak files should be in this path. This path should NOT be pointing to a floppy (or virtual floppy) drive. SET REMOTE_INSTALL_STATE=0|1 If this variable is set to 0, then upon termination FixTool returns control to the calling process. SET CSFDRIVEAPPLY=d Allows you to restrict service to products found only on drive d and on the boot drive. SET CSFTIMESTAMP=1 Adds a timestamp to each line of the SERVICE.LOG file. | SET CSFSTAGEDRIVE=d Allows you to determine where the | locked files will be temporarily | stored. d is the drive on which to | put the locked files. | | SET CSFSKIPCRC=1 Allows you to skip the CRC checking | of the FixPak files. Be careful to | use this only if necessary. The CRC | check identifies bad media and prevents | potential problems. ****************************************************************************** Section 11. If You Have a Problem If the FixPak does not install properly, there are files you can look in to find out what error occurred. The SERVICE.LOG file is the first place to look. The FixTool puts it in the x:\OS2\INSTALL directory where x: is the OS/2 boot drive. If the FixTool is unable to complete processing successfully, then the next time you use the FixTool, it will try to recover, picking up from where it stopped previously. It uses information from C:\FIXSTART to recover. You may also notice a directory $CSFTMP$ on a drive that had the largest amount of free space available when the FixTool last started. It is safe to delete this directory and any files in it any time the FixTool is not running. This directory is recreated on the drive with the most free space available whenever starting the FixTool. Due to system usage and drive space changes, it may not be the same drive each time for this directory. ****************************************************************************** Section 12. Common Error Messages Here are some common error messages that you may receive when running SERVICE. - Error message: An error occurred while searching for files to update. The reason may be old or corrupt CSF logfiles, CSF_SEL.000 file, or file system corruption. See README file for more information. Explanation #1: You may get this if you have used the new FixTool (version 1.38 or later) to install a FixPak, and then try to use an old version of the FixTool (version 1.37B or earlier). Solution #1: If you are installing a LAN FixPak, you can delete all the LOGF0000.xxx and LOGSTART.xxx files on your system, and reapply the FixPak. If you are installing an OS/2 FixPak, you will also need to copy your original SYSLEVEL.OS2 file back into the \OS2\INSTALL directory. Explanation #2: You may also get this error if you are trying to service a system that has many syslevel files (over about 150) on all drives. Solution #2: If your system has a large number of syslevel files, you may have to limit the search for products to be serviced by using the following set statement before you run SERVICE: SET CSFDRIVEAPPLY=d where d is the drive you wish to service. This statement limits the search for serviceable products to one drive at a time in addition to the boot drive. This will get the number of files opened down to a workable level. - Error message: No products were found on the target system to service. Explanation #1: Your SYSLEVEL.xxx file does not contain the proper prerequisite FixPak number or product information. In order to install a FixPak, the number of the FixPak must be higher than the number of the current CSD in the SYSLEVEL.xxx file, or the product information must match. Solution #1: Check the prerequisites needed for the FixPak you are trying to install. Some FixPaks have a particular FixPak that must be installed prior to installing that FixPak. Also, make sure that the FixPak you are trying to install is one that may be applied to that product. If the product information is incorrect, you may need to copy the product SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media. Explanation #2: If you have committed an OS/2 base FixPak with Version 1.38 or Version 1.39, you may get this message when you try to install another FixPak. Solution #2: Copy the product's SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media or from a backup copy that was made prior to committing the FixPak. - Error message: The path <path\filename> does not exist or is invalid. Explanation: FixTool could not unpack the file specified in the message, or it could not unpack the file just prior to the file specified in the message. Solution: This indicates that the FixPak media is bad. You should download the FixPak again, re-create the FixPak diskettes, and then re-install the FixPak. The FixTool will resume, starting at the point where it stopped. If you get RC=109 in the service.log, the file listed prior to the first RC=109 is probably giving an unpack error. The modules that received the 109 error were not updated properly. Make sure that you are using the UNPACK2.EXE that comes with this version of the FixTool. You should also download the FixPak again and re-create the FixPak diskettes. Then reinstall the FixPak from the new media. The FixTool will resume, updating any files that were not originally updated. If this does not fix the problem, please contact your service representative. - Error message: Error reading file <path>\IBMCSFLK.DLL. Explanation: FixTool could not find the files needed for servicing. Solution: Make sure that you've set the CSFUTILPATH and CSFCDROMDIR environment variables if you're running service from a hard drive. The CSFUTILPATH should point to the directory that contains the FixTool files (SERVICE.EXE, FSERVICE.EXE, etc.), and CSFCDROMDIR should point to the directory that contains the FixPak files (with the FIX directory). Also make sure that all the files listed in Section 2 are in your FixTool file directory. - Error message: No source drive is available. Explanation: The FixTool first checks for removable drives on the system. If there are no removable drives, you will get this error message if you have not set the CSFCDROMDIR to point to a valid hard drive or LAN drive. Solution: Set the CSFCDROMDIR to point to the drive and directory that contain the FixPak files. - Error message: Checksum error in <file>. Explanation: The FixTool checks the checksum of the source media with a checksum that was recorded when the FixPak was created. If these values do not match, you will receive this error. Solution: This indicates that the FixPak media is bad. Download the FixPak again and re-create the FixPak diskettes, or get another FixPak CD. Then reinstall the FixPak. The FixTool will resume, starting at the point where it stopped. - Error message: The path SET CSFCDROMDIR=<path\filename> does not exist or is invalid. Explanation: FixTool could not find the FIX directory in the path given in the SET CSFCDROMDIR statement. Solution: Check to make sure the path given in the SET CSFCDROMDIR statement is pointing to the directory that contains the FixPak. This directory should contain all the files and directories included in the FixPak. Here are some common error messages that you might see when running FSERVICE. - Error message: CSF257: No product has been selected. Explanation: This error message is reported in several situations. You may not have selected a product to service in the RESPONSE.FIL, or FSERVICE may not have found any products to service. If FSERVICE didn't find any products to service, either the product information on the system did not match the product information in the FixPak, or FSERVICE determined that the FixPak would back-level the system. Solution: Check the prerequisites for the FixPak and make sure that the system contains the proper pre-requisites. Also, be sure that the FixPak you are trying to install is being applied to the appropriate product. If the product information is incorrect, you may need to copy the product SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media. - Error message: This portion of service has completed. Reboot your system before applying additional service or using the product to process files that were locked during service. Explanation: This appears as a red screen with a title of "Corrective Service Facility Fatal Error," but the message may not indicate an error. Please view the service.log file by pressing Enter. This screen appears after doing a backout with FSERVICE so that you can check the log file to make sure there are no errors before you reboot your system. Solution: Make sure that there are no errors logged and then press Ctrl-Break to exit service. If there were no errors in the log file, then FSERVICE completed successfully and it's safe to reboot your system. - Error message: Error reading file <path>\IBMCSFLK.DLL. Explanation: FixTool could not find the files needed for servicing. Solution: Make sure that all the files listed in Section 2 are in the directory (or on the diskette) with the FixTool files. Also, make sure your /S: parameter path is valid. It should contain the FixPak files with the FIX directory. Sometimes you may need to include the /S: parameter--even if you have set SOURCE properly in the response file. ****************************************************************************** Section 13. Other Known Problems The following problems have also been encountered: - When using SERVICE, one of the panels contains a Reboot button that no longer is needed. This button was used when you wanted to reboot from the CSF boot diskettes, but the CSF boot diskettes are no longer available. You should select Continue, or you can select Cancel and reboot the system using boot diskettes for that product. - BOOTOS2 induced problem. BOOTOS2 (corrected in latest version) copied the SYSLEVEL.OS2 file from the booted partition which was used to create the BOOTOS2 partition to the new partition. This SYSLEVEL.OS2 file could have had default service directories that included drive letters in it. Since BOOTOS2 copied the file to a different partition, the wrong drive letter would be specified for the FixTool to use when looking for files to be serviced. The SYSLEVEL.OS2 normally would have default directories in it after one had applied service to a partition, or possibly after the system install. The net result here is that if you had a SYSLEVEL.OS2 file with default directories in it, then created a BOOTOS2 partition, and later tried to service the BOOTOS2 partition, the FixTool not only would apply service to the BOOTOS2 partition, but the default directories in the SYSLEVEL.OS2 file as well (the partition where the SYSLEVEL.OS2 came from). The solution here is to copy the SYSLEVEL.OS2 from your distribution diskette or CD into OS2\INSTALL directory of the BOOTOS2 partition before applying service to that partition. - A trap can occur if you include an unformatted drive for the archive directory. This occurs even if you format the drive in a different session before the FixTool processes any files for archiving. This happens because the FixTool scans for formatted drives at the beginning of the program and creates a list of possible drives, which is not added to during subsequent processing. The solution is to make sure that you have a valid, formatted drive given for the ARCHIVE directory BEFORE the FixTool starts. If not, you must stop and then restart the FixTool once the drive is valid. | - If your drive C: is formatted with FAT32, you may get the following error message: "An error occurred. The reason may be old or corrupt CSF logfiles, CSF_SEL.000 file, or file system corruption." This is a general error message that's returned when an unexpected return code is encountered. The error is sent because the FixTool searches for the FIXSTART file on C:, and therefore needs a C: partition that contains data it can read, such as FAT or HPFS. The solution is to create a dummy C: partition that's formatted FAT or HPFS. Try to boot to that C: partition (which will fail, but allows it to remain the active C: partition). Then boot OS/2 and install the FixPak. Finally, boot to the other C: partition, which will make it the default C: drive. ****************************************************************************** Section 14. List of Changes Made for Each Version (1.38 and Later) This section gives a description of what changes have been made for the new versions of the FixTool (Version 1.38 and later). | NOTE: FixTool 1.42 and FixTool 1.37B are the only supported FixTools. | FixTool 1.42 supersedes all FixTools. FixTool 1.37B can continue to be used only on FixPaks that it was released with. | All other FixPaks should use FixTool 1.42. | Changes Made in Version 1.42 | - Added processing to detect the drive that VoiceType, Security, and | OpenDoc are installed on. These can now be serviced without the | USERDIRS.OS2 file. | | - Changed the way forced locked files are processed. RIPL tree files | will no longer be force locked, and WIN-OS/2 files on a drive other | than the boot drive may be force locked. | | - A config.sys file of 0 bytes will no longer be created on drives | being serviced that do not contain a config.sys file. | | - The base device driver FixPak will be processed as an OS/2 product | instead of a LAN product. | | - ABIOSless machines with RAM-loaded ABIOS will be properly detected. | | - Added backup/backout response file information to RESPONSE.LAN file. | | - Modified Fixtool to work with DBCS OS/2 base operating system | FixPaks, with a pre-requisite of FX00505 for OS/2 Warp 4 and | WX03807 for OS/2 Warp 3. | | - Can now rejoin large files that have been split across diskettes. | | - OS2KRNL, OS2LDR, and OS2BOOT files will only be given SYSTEM / HIDDEN | attributes in the root directory. If these files are serviced in other | directories, they will not be made into SYSTEM / HIDDEN files. | Changes Made in Version 1.41 - Added the ability to include a timestamp in the SERVICE.LOG file. - Enhanced the performance when installing from diskettes. - Copy packed files to a temporary directory on the hard drive and then run checksum and unpack against the files on the temporary directory. An additional 1.1 MB is required for this processing. The drive used for this is the one with the most available space. - Fixed error that occurred when C: is the CD-ROM drive. CSF_SEL.000 and FIXSTART will be written to the first non-removable, non-network drive on the system. - Changed Backout routine so that any CSBKExxx.EXE exit routines will run last, after the syslevel files are updated and the files are backed out. - Updated FILEFIX.DLL to detect invalid release numbers. These must be between 1 and 255. Also, this file was updated to not return a mismatch when the file versions are the same. Changes Made in Version 1.40 - Fixes a commit problem introduced with FixTool 1.38. If you committed an OS/2 base FixPak with Version 1.38 or 1.39, you cannot install subsequent FixPaks without reverting to a SYSLEVEL.OS2 file used prior to the commit (you can use the SYSLEVEL.OS2 that was shipped with the product from the product diskettes/CD). After you had done a commit, applied a FP to the committed base, and then either restored from the commit Archive or backed out an installed FP, the fact that the base was at a specific FixPak level was lost. The FixTool will now create in OS2\INSTALL a file named FPCOMMIT.OS2 to hold the base committed SYSLEVEL. This will be restored to SYSLEVEL.OS2 during either of these 2 restore activities. Do not erase this file. - Eliminates a SYS0039 error when using SERVICE without a diskette in the drive when starting the FixTool. - Allows you to set a new CSFDRIVEAPPLY environment variable prior to running SERVICE which will limit the search for products to be serviced to the drive given in the set statement and to the boot drive. - Includes an updated FPINST.CMD file that uses the /B: parameter for LAN-related FixPak installations. - Includes an updated UNPACK2.EXE and updated error handling for messages coming from UNPACK2.EXE. - Includes checksum verification on the source media. This fix prevents corrupted source files from being transferred to the target system. You may also notice a slight increase in the time it takes to process files to be updated. - Includes an ARCHCTL utility that allows you to turn off archive processing for a particular FixPak. Changes Made in Version 1.39 - Works with OS/2 Warp v3.0 and LAN-related FixPaks. The backout- to-backup process was fixed for LAN-related FixPaks. - The CSFUTILPATH environment variable does not have to be set to be able to run SERVICE from a hard drive. - Now services systems that do not have a removable media drive. - Contains an updated response file for Warp 4 systems. Changes Made in Version 1.38 NOTE: Version 1.38 of the FixTool was for use with OS/2 Warp v4.0 systems only. - Updates the CSD level in the SYSLEVEL.xxx file for all products. The CSD level is updated to match the FixPak number. - Recognizes Software Choice installed features. When backing out a FixPak, you will be given a chance to cancel the backout if a Software Choice installed feature will be broken by the FixPak backout. - No longer uses CSF boot diskettes. The FixTool now comes as a self-extracting zip file that can be unzipped to a single diskette. - Places the locked file device driver statements closer to the beginning of the CONFIG.SYS. - Corrects a problem with the backout-to-backup process when a file is serviced in more than one directory.
 service.boulder.ibm.com/ps/products/os2/fixtool/english-us/cs_142.exe
Corrective Service facility v. 2-B 1.41 (6/12/1999) Readme/What's new
Readme for Corrective Service Facility 2-B Version 1.41 **************************** NOTE: Change bars (|) included to the left of the text indicate that this line has changed or been added since the last READ.ME update. | This readme file describes the features available with Version 1.41 of the Corrective Service Facility (referred to in this document as the FixTool). Once you use this version of the FixTool to service a product, you will not be able to use Version 1.37B or earlier. SYSLEVEL files are modified by FixTool 1.38 and later, causing FixTool 1.37B or earlier not to find products to service. This document supplements the information given in the README.INF that comes with the FixTool. The README.INF includes more details about the FixTool process. CONTENTS: Section 1. How to Use the FixTool EXE (Zip) File Section 2. Files Included in the FixTool EXE File Section 3. How to Tell What FixTool Version You Have Section 4. Basic Installation for First-Time FixPak Users Section 5. Other Ways to Apply Service Section 6. How to Set Up the FixTool for Remote Installation Section 7. How to Customize the Response File Section 8. How to Turn Off Archiving for a FixPak Section 9. Setting Environment Variables Section 10. If You Have a Problem Section 11. Common Error Messages Section 12. Other Known Problems Section 13. List of Changes Made for Each Version (1.38 and Later) ****************************************************************************** Section 1. How to Use the FixTool EXE (Zip) File First, unzip the FixTool zip file onto a diskette or into a directory. You can do this by copying the self-extracting zip file into a new subdirectory and then use the following commands from an OS/2 command prompt: <d>: cd <directory> | CSx141 <target> where <d> is the drive that you've put the FixTool zip file on, <directory> is the directory that you've copied the self-extracting zip file to. x Country code, where '_' is the US country code. Other NLV country codes are identical to the Country code used in FixPak's. <target> is the fully qualified path where the file is to be unzipped to. If <target> is not a diskette, you can also copy all the files in <target> | onto a diskette, except for CSx141.EXE if you wish. Next, you need OS/2 boot capability. For this, you can use any of the following: - boot the install diskettes for the product you're servicing - create utility diskettes from your system and boot these - use a maintenance partition if you have one - boot through Alt-F1 and go to the command prompt - boot OS/2 as usual and then open an OS/2 session ****************************************************************************** Section 2. Files Included in the FixTool EXE File The following files are included in the FixTool EXE (Zip) file: File Use -------------- ----------------------------------------------------------- BUILD.LVL Contains build information for this FixTool release. CSFPANS.DLL Used by FSERVICE | SERVICE.EXE Executable for applying service through a windowed session SERVICE.HLP SERVICE help file SHPIINST.DLL FixTool required DLL UNPACK.EXE Used to unpack files being serviced UNPACK2.EXE Used to unpack files being serviced VIOCALLS.DLL FixTool required DLL | FSERVICE.EXE Executable for applying service through a command line (used with a response file). IBMCSFLK.DLL Locked file device driver file IBMCSFLK.EXE Locked file device driver file IBMCSFLK.SYS Locked file device driver file IBMCSFLK.MSG Locked file device driver file PACK.EXE Used to pack files being archived or backed up README.INF General Installation instructions for the FixTool RESPONSE.LAN Response file for servicing network-related products | RESPONSE.WP3 Response file for servicing OS/2 Warp v3 base | RESPONSE.WP4 Response file for servicing OS/2 Warp v4 base FSERVICE.MSG FSERVICE message file FPINST.CMD Command file for applying service through FSERVICE (uses standard response files for OS/2 Warp 3, OS/2 Warp 4, and network-related FixPaks) NLS.DLL FixTool required DLL MSG.DLL FixTool required DLL | FILEFIX.DLL FixTool required DLL ARCHCTL.CMD Command file that allows you to turn off archiving for a particular FixPak. | READ.ME This file ****************************************************************************** Section 3. How to Tell What FixTool Version You Have | You can tell if you have Version 1.41 by running BLDLEVEL on SERVICE.EXE or FSERVICE.EXE. You will see one of the following, depending on which version of BLDLEVEL.EXE you have. | Signature: @#IBM:F.141#@ OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 Vendor: IBM | Revision: 0.141 | File Version: 0.141 Description: OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 | Signature: @#IBM:F.141#@ OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 Vendor: IBM | Revision: F.141 Description: OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 The new version of the FixTool (Corrective Service Facility) updates the current CSD field in the SYSLEVEL files of the products it services. After | applying a FixPak with Version 1.41, you will be able to run SYSLEVEL and tell what FixPaks you have applied by looking at the current field of the product's SYSLEVEL file. This version is also compatible with Software Choice features. If you need to use Software Choice to install new features for a product, the FixTool will integrate SYSLEVEL and archive information from the Software Choice install the next time it services that product. ****************************************************************************** |Section 4. Basic Installation for First-Time FixPak Users | | This is a very basic set of instructions to help you install an OS/2 Warp | FixPak; it contains installation tips from OS/2 support technicians. | | This document is designed to help you understand how to prepare your system | and then install an OS/2 Warp base FixPak. It is important that you also read | the README file supplied with the FixPak you are installing. | | This document only discusses local FixPak installations from diskettes using | the Corrective Service Facility (CSF) FixTool 1.41. For other methods of | installation see Section 5. | | Before you can begin the FixPak installation, either obtain the FixPak | diskettes from IBM, or download the FixPak and run LOADDSKF.EXE to convert | the downloaded FixPak images into a usable diskette format. | | Note: LOADDSKF.EXE can be found on the OS/2 Warp installation CD in the | DISKIMGS directory. | |4.1. Prerequisites: | |4.1.1. You must have at least 70 megabytes of free space available on your | hard drive. At least 20 MB of the 70 MB must be available on the C: | drive if installing to another partition. | | To determine how much free space is available, open an OS/2 Command | Prompt window and type CHKDSK; then press Enter. CHKDSK will search | the disk and report its findings, including the number of kilobytes | available for use. This number must exceed 70000 kilobytes. | |4.2.2. You must create utility diskettes. | | These diskettes will allow you to boot to a command prompt and perform | various utility maintenance jobs on your computer to prepare it for the | FixPak install as well as to help recover from some minor problems. | | 4.2.2.1. How to create utility diskettes: | | Note: Before you begin, you must have three blank diskettes and the | installation CD for OS/2 Warp 3 or Warp Server, or four blank diskettes | and the installation CD for OS/2 Warp 4. | | a. From the desktop, click on the OS/2 System icon, | b. Click on the System Setup icon, | c. Click on the Create Utility Diskettes icon. | d. Follow the prompts to label, insert and remove the diskettes. | |4.2.3. Run CHKDSK. | | The computer must be running well before you install a FixPak. If you | are experiencing any problems with your machine, please contact your | technical support representative to get the machine fixed. Even if your | machine is running well, it is a good idea to run CHKDSK; it may find | and fix some unknown problems. | | 4.2.3.1 To run CHKDSK: | | a. Shut down the computer. | b. Insert Utility Diskette 1 in drive A: and restart the computer. | c. Replace the diskettes as prompted, until you reach an A:\ prompt. | d. Insert the last utility diskette (Utility Diskette 3 for OS/2 Warp 3, | Utility Diskette 4 for OS/2 Warp 4). | e. At the A:\ prompt, type CHKDSK C: /F, then press Enter. | CHKDSK will search the disk and attempt to fix any problems. | f. If CHKDSK reports any problems, record the errors, then rerun CHKDSK | to verify that the problems were actually fixed. | |4.2.4. DO NOT USE YOUR SYSTEM | | Once you begin a FixPak installation, do not try to use your system for | any other purpose. Unexpected problems may arise, causing the FixPak | installation to fail. | |4.2.5. Record Your Current Revision Level Number. | | Before beginning the FixPak installation, verify the current version and | revision level of the operating system, as follows: | | Open an OS/2 Command Prompt window, and type VER /R, then press Enter. | Record the information displayed; for example: | | The Operating System/2 Version is 4.00 | Revision 9.030 | | Once you have completed the FixPak installation, you can verify that the | revision number has been properly updated. | | |4.2.6. UNDERSTAND ALL THE WORDS | | If there are any words, phases or instructions in this document that you | do not understand or if you do not know their meaning, please contact | your local support representative for an explanation. | | Once you have successfully completed all of the above steps, and are | satisfied that your system is in good working order and ready to begin, | proceed to the instructions below. If you have any questions or | concerns, contact you computer support adminstrator and address them | before continuing. | |4.2. Basic Installation Instructions | | There are several ways to install a FixPak; this section of the readme | uses the FPINST procedure. | | 1. Shutdown your computer. | | 2. Insert Utility Diskette 1 in the diskette drive and restart the | computer, either by turning on the power, or pressing the | Ctrl+Alt+Del keys. | | 3. As prompted, remove and insert utility diskettes until you come to an | A:\ prompt. | | 4. Remove the current utility diskette, and insert the last of the | series (Utility Diskette 3 for OS/2 Warp 3, or Utility Diskette 4 | for OS/2 Warp 4). | | 5. Type CHKDSK C: /F then press Enter. This will run the CHKDSK program. | Review the reported findings. Look for any recognizable problems and | fix them. | | Note: If CHKDSK does detect problems, run the command again, to | verify that the problems were really fixed. If CHKDSK continues to | find problems and is unable to fix them, please contact your local | support representative to resolve the problems before continuing | with the FixPak installation. | | 6. As mentioned in Section 2.1 above, CHKDSK also reports the amount of | free space remaining. If you have at least 70 MB free (70000 | Kilobytes or 70000000 Bytes) then you can proceed with the FixPak | install. If not, you must delete or move enough files to meet the | free space requirement before continuing. | | 7. Insert the Corrective Service FixTool diskette (CSF FIXT 141). | | 8. At the command prompt, enter one of the following commands and then | press Enter. | | For an OS/2 Warp 3 or Warp Server Base FixPak: | FPINST Warp3 | | For an OS/2 Warp 4 Base FixPak: | FPINST Warp4 | | 9. The FixPak installation program will perform a variety of functions. | | Note: Near the beginning of the FixPak installation, it may appear | as if nothing is happening. Please be patient. | | The only other user action required will be to remove and insert | diskettes as prompted. | | When the installation is complete, you will be informed and prompted | to restart the computer. Do this by pressing Ctrl+Alt+Del, or by | turning the power off and then back on. ****************************************************************************** Section 5. Other Ways to Apply Service Once you have boot capability (see Section 1) and are at a command prompt, you can apply service using one of the following methods: Using FPINST Using SERVICE Using FSERVICE with a custom RESPONSE.FIL Insert the FixTool diskette you created, or change to the directory that the FixTool is in, and then use FPINST or FSERVICE as described in Sections 5.1 and 5.3. To use SERVICE as described in Section 5.2, you must have OS/2 running without having booted from diskettes, maintenance partition, or via Alt-F1. 5.1. Using FPINST To use FPINST, change to the diskette or directory where you have FPINST.CMD and the related files, and type FPINST fixpak_type <boot_drive> where fixpak_type is WARP3 for OS/2 Warp Version 3.0 FixPak installs, WARP4 for OS/2 Warp Version 4.0 FixPak installs, or NETWORK for LAN or network-related FixPak installs, and <boot_drive> is an optional parameter that is only valid when fixpak_type is NETWORK. This is the boot drive of the system. This restricts the application of FixPaks to specific drives on systems where more than one OS/2 system is applied. | FPINST uses FSERVICE with default response files. These default response | files do the following: | | For OS/2 Base FixPaks, the default response file saves an archive copy of the | files it services in <boot_drive>:\ARCHIVE. It does not keep a backup for | files serviced, other than the archived files. If this is not the first OS/2 | base FixPak installed and if you want to be able to backout to the previous | FixPak level, you must modify the default response file. | | Also, the default response file does not automatically replace all files from | the FixPak. The FixTool will prompt you to find out whether to replace any | files on the system that appear to be newer than the files in the FixPak. | This happens because the REPLACE_NEWER flag is not set in the default | response file for OS/2 Warp v3 or v4. | | For LAN or network-related FixPaks, there will be no archives or backups | kept by default, and the FixTool will service all partitions that contain | the product being serviced by that FixPak. If you wish to restrict the | drives serviced, you must modify the default response file. | | NOTE: If you need to install a FixPak with different options from the ones | described above, then you must either modify the default response file or | use SERVICE instead of FPINST. See Section 6 for information about how to | modify a response file. See the next section for information about SERVICE. 5.2. Using SERVICE To use SERVICE, go to the diskette or directory where you have SERVICE.EXE and the related files. Then type SERVICE The program will prompt you for required inputs. See README.INF for more information about these panels. With FixTool Version 1.39 or later, the CSFUTILPATH defaults to the path that you have executed SERVICE from, so you do not need to set this environment variable if all the FixTool files are in the same directory with SERVICE.EXE. NOTE: To use SERVICE, you must have the OS/2 PM Shell running. You cannot run SERVICE if you have booted from install diskettes or if you pressed Alt-F1 to get to a command prompt. 5.3. Using FSERVICE To use FSERVICE from a diskette, copy your customized RESPONSE.FIL to the diskette with the FixTool files, then go to the diskette and type FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL If you have copied the FixTool files into a directory, you need to use the following command from the directory with FSERVICE.EXE and the related files (including your custom RESPONSE.FIL): FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL /S:<d>:\<directory> where <d> is the drive with the FixTool related files and <directory> is the directory structure where you put the FixTool files. There are optional parameters that can be included on the FSERVICE command line. See the README.INF file for more details about these parameters. You should use the /B:<drive> parameter with FSERVICE when applying LAN FixPaks on systems with more than one OS/2 boot partition. <drive> is the OS/2 boot partition to be serviced. ****************************************************************************** Section 6. How to Set Up the FixTool for Remote Installation To speed up FixPak installation or to setup a FixPak on a LAN drive for use by others (Redirected Install), follow these steps. Before you begin, it is recommended that you install a Virtual Floppy Disk program such as SVDISK (Super Virtual Disk) or VFDISK (Virtual Floppy Disk). In the following examples, d: is the working drive and j: is the Virtual Floppy drive. Replace this with the drive letters you use. Also in these examples, XR_W035 is the FixPak name. First, setup a directory to hold the FixTool code. For example, run the following to place the FixTool into the d:\csf directory. | cs_141.exe d:\csf Next, setup the FixPak directory using the diskette images. loaddskf xr_w035.1dk j: /f/y/q xcopy j: d:\xr_w035\ /h/o/t/s/e/r/v loaddskf xr_w035.2dk j: /f/y/q xcopy j: d:\xr_w035\ /h/o/t/s/e/r/v ... ... ... <repeat for each disk image in the FixPak> Install the FixPak by running service.exe. set csfutilpath=d:\csf set csfcdromdir=d:\xr_w035 d: cd csf service (or start service) You can also apply service by running fservice.exe with a response file. d: cd csf fservice /r:d:\csf\response.wp3 /s:d:\xr_w035 This will apply the FixPak to all serviceable partitions. If you want to make the response file specific to a partition (drive) then you need to change the :SYSLEVEL and :ARCHIVE lines in response.wp3: :SYSLEVEL \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVE -- should be changed to -- :SYSLEVEL x:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE x:\ARCHIVE where x: is the drive you want serviced. ****************************************************************************** Section 7. How to Customize the Response File There are three standard response files included with the FixTool that can be modified for your configuration needs. To modify a response file, copy one of the standard response files (RESPONSE.WP3, RESPONSE.WP4, or RESPONSE.LAN) to a file called RESPONSE.FIL. Modify the RESPONSE.FIL as needed, and then run FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL. The following sections show a few of the service actions you can take through a response file. For more information about response files, view the README.INF file that comes with the FixTool. 7.1. Applying Service to a Product Without an Existing Archive This response file can be used to apply service for the first time using FSERVICE when there is no existing archive of the product being serviced. It will service all partitions and place an archive in each partition. It does not take a backup of changed files. In this case, the SERVICE.LOG file will go into the C:\OS2\INSTALL directory. Files that are read-only, hidden, or system files will be replaced automatically during service. The FixPak source files are on A:. The FixTool will service all partitions where \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 and \MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM are found, and it will save the original files in an \ARCHIVE directory for each partition serviced. Note that the :LOGFILE tag is optional and may be overridden by using the /L: parameter on the FSERVICE command line. The :FLAGS and :SOURCE tags are also optional, but if used, the :SERVICE tag must be included. The :SOURCE tag can be overridden by using the /S: parameter on the FSERVICE command line. You should include a :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, and :ARCHIVE tag for each product to be serviced. Note that the :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, and :ARCHIVE tags must appear in the order shown in this example. | The REPLACE_NEWER flag can be added to the :FLAGS line as shown here: | :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED REPLACE_NEWER | | This flag will replace files automatically instead of giving a pop-up | panel that questions whether you want to replace a file that is newer on | the system with an older version from the FixPak. | | Warning: Using the REPLACE_NEWER flag may cause files to be back-leveled. | Be sure that you know it is okay to replace the files that are newer before | you use this flag. | | This flag was included in the previous default response files for OS/2 Warp 3, | but has been deleted because it allows you to back-level files | unintentionally. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED :SOURCE A:\ :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVE :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL \MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVEM For OS/2 Warp 4 systems, the multimedia lines are not needed in the response file. So, the last three lines in the previous example should be removed or commented out of the response file for OS/2 Warp 4.0. 7.2. Applying Service to a Product With an Existing Archive This response file can be used to apply service using FSERVICE when there is an existing archive of the product being serviced. This demonstrates the ability to take a backup of changed files. Notice that each product serviced must be backed up to a different directory, so the drive must be explicitly defined in the :SYSLEVEL, :ARCHIVE, and :BACKUP lines. Also note the order of the :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, :ARCHIVE, and :BACKUP tags. These tags must appear in this order. The :BACKUP tag is optional. | The REPLACE_NEWER flag can be added to the :FLAGS line as shown here: | :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED REPLACE_NEWER | | This flag will replace files automatically instead of giving a pop-up | panel that questions whether you want to replace a file that is newer on | the system with an older version from the FixPak. | | Warning: Using the REPLACE_NEWER flag may cause files to be back-leveled. | Be sure that you know it is okay to replace the files that are newer before | you use this flag. | | This flag was included in the previous default response files for OS/2 Warp 3, | but has been deleted because it allows you to back-level files | unintentionally. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED :SOURCE A:\ :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE C:\ARCHIVE :BACKUP C:\BACKUP :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE C:\ARCHIVEM :BACKUP C:\BACKUPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, the last four lines are not needed in the response file. 7.3. Backing Out to the Archive Level of a Product This is a sample response file to be used when backing out to the archive level of a product. Note that you can only use one :TARGET tag in the response file. Also note that the :TARGET tag must appear before a :BACKOUT tag is used. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG | :SOURCE A:\ :TARGET ARCHIVE :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, you do not need to include the last two lines of this example in your response file. 7.4. Backing Out to the Backup Level of a Product This is a sample response file to be used when backing out to the backup level of a product. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG | :SOURCE A:\ :TARGET BACKUP :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, you do not need to include the last two lines of this example in your response file. 7.5. Committing a Product This is a sample response file to be used when committing a product. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG | :SOURCE A:\ :COMMIT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :COMMIT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, do not include the last two lines of this example in your response file. 7.6. Redirecting an Archive of a Product to Another Existing Archive This is a sample response file to be used when redirecting an archive of a product to another existing archive location. One example of this would be for using a shared network archive. Note that the archive directory specifies the location of an existing archive to which the current product is being redirected. In this example the arbitrary drive shows S:, which may be a LAN drive. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG | :SOURCE A:\ :REDIRECT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE S:\ARCHIVE :REDIRECT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE S:\ARCHIVEM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, do not include the last three lines of this example in your response file. ****************************************************************************** Section 8. How to Turn Off Archiving for a FixPak With FixTool 1.40 and later, a new utility called ARCHCTL.CMD is included. This utility allows you to turn off the archiving feature of a FixPak. This is especially useful if you have already tested a FixPak in a controlled environment and are convinced that there will be no need to backout the FixPak to an original product level. With archiving turned off, you may include a backup directory and backup to your previous level if desired. But you will not be able to back up more than one level. For example, if you install OS/2 Base FixPak 8 with archiving turned off and include a backup directory, then when you install FixPak 9, the backup directory for FixPak 8 is deleted. If you do not include a backup directory with archiving turned off, there is no way to back up to a previous level. The syntax for the ARCHCTL utility is as follows: ARCHCTL ON|OFF fixpak_source where ON|OFF indicates the action to perform. ON enables archiving; OFF disables it. fixpak_source is normally the drive with the first FixPak diskette, but it can also be the root of the FixPak when copied to the hard disk (where the \FIX subdirectory is located). The default for OS/2 FixPaks is ON. The default for LAN FixPaks is OFF. Examples for turning archiving OFF: Example 1. 1. Place first FixPak diskette in A: 2. Enter ARCHCTL OFF A: Example 2. 1. XCOPY all FixPak diskette data to N:\FIXES\FP32 2. Enter ARCHCTL OFF N:\FIXES\FP32 Examples for turning archiving ON: Example 3. 1. Place first FixPak diskette in A: 2. Enter ARCHCTL ON A: Example 4. 1. XCOPY all FixPak diskette data to N:\FIXES\FP32 2. Enter ARCHCTL ON N:\FIXES\FP32 ****************************************************************************** Section 9. Setting Environment Variables There are several SET statements that set environment variables for the FixTool to use. See the table below for a list of these variables and a description of what they do. Environment Variable Usage ------------------------------- ----------------------------------- SET CSFUTILPATH=path Allows you to run SERVICE or FSERVICE from your hard drive or from a redirected drive. SET CSFCDROMDIR=path Allows you to install a FixPak from a redirected drive or CD-ROM. All of the FixPak files should be in this path. This path should NOT be pointing to a floppy (or virtual floppy) drive. SET REMOTE_INSTALL_STATE=0|1 If this variable is set to 0, then upon termination FixTool returns control to the calling process. SET CSFDRIVEAPPLY=d Allows you to restrict service to products found only on drive d and on the boot drive. | SET CSFTIMESTAMP=1 Adds a timestamp to each line of the | SERVICE.LOG file. ****************************************************************************** Section 10. If You Have a Problem If the FixPak does not install properly, there are files you can look in to find out what error occurred. The SERVICE.LOG file is the first place to look. The FixTool puts it in the x:\OS2\INSTALL directory where x: is the OS/2 boot drive. | If the FixTool is unable to complete processing successfully, then the next | time you use the FixTool, it will try to recover, picking up from where it | stopped previously. It uses information from C:\FIXSTART to recover. You | may also notice a directory $CSFTMP$ on a drive that had the largest amount | of free space available when the FixTool last started. It is safe to delete | this directory and any files in it any time the FixTool is not running. This | directory is recreated on the drive with the most free space available | whenever starting the FixTool. Due to system usage and drive space changes, | it may not be the same drive each time for this directory. ****************************************************************************** Section 11. Common Error Messages Here are some common error messages that you may receive when running SERVICE. - Error message: An error occurred while searching for files to update. The reason may be old or corrupt CSF logfiles, CSF_SEL.000 file, or file system corruption. See README file for more information. Explanation #1: You may get this if you have used the new FixTool (version 1.38 or later) to install a FixPak, and then try to use an old version of the FixTool (version 1.37B or earlier). Solution #1: If you are installing a LAN FixPak, you can delete all the LOGF0000.xxx and LOGSTART.xxx files on your system, and reapply the FixPak. If you are installing an OS/2 FixPak, you will also need to copy your original SYSLEVEL.OS2 file back into the \OS2\INSTALL directory. Explanation #2: You may also get this error if you are trying to service a system that has many syslevel files (over about 150) on all drives. Solution #2: If your system has a large number of syslevel files, you may have to limit the search for products to be serviced by using the following set statement before you run SERVICE: SET CSFDRIVEAPPLY=d where d is the drive you wish to service. This statement limits the search for serviceable products to one drive at a time in addition to the boot drive. This will get the number of files opened down to a workable level. - Error message: No products were found on the target system to service. Explanation #1: Your SYSLEVEL.xxx file does not contain the proper prerequisite FixPak number or product information. In order to install a FixPak, the number of the FixPak must be higher than the number of the current CSD in the SYSLEVEL.xxx file, or the product information must match. Solution #1: Check the prerequisites needed for the FixPak you are trying to install. Some FixPaks have a particular FixPak that must be installed prior to installing that FixPak. Also, make sure that the FixPak you are trying to install is one that may be applied to that product. If the product information is incorrect, you may need to copy the product SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media. Explanation #2: If you have committed an OS/2 base FixPak with Version 1.38 or Version 1.39, you may get this message when you try to install another FixPak. Solution #2: Copy the product's SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media or from a backup copy that was made prior to committing the FixPak. - Error message: The path <path\filename> does not exist or is invalid. Explanation: FixTool could not unpack the file specified in the message, or it could not unpack the file just prior to the file specified in the message. Solution: This indicates that the FixPak media is bad. You should download the FixPak again, re-create the FixPak diskettes, and then re-install the FixPak. The FixTool will resume, starting at the point where it stopped. If you get RC=109 in the service.log, the file listed prior to the first RC=109 is probably giving an unpack error. The modules that received the 109 error were not updated properly. Make sure that you are using the UNPACK2.EXE that comes with this version of the FixTool. You should also download the FixPak again and re-create the FixPak diskettes. Then reinstall the FixPak from the new media. The FixTool will resume, updating any files that were not originally updated. If this does not fix the problem, please contact your service representative. - Error message: Error reading file <path>\IBMCSFLK.DLL. Explanation: FixTool could not find the files needed for servicing. Solution: Make sure that you've set the CSFUTILPATH and CSFCDROMDIR environment variables if you're running service from a hard drive. The CSFUTILPATH should point to the directory that contains the FixTool files (SERVICE.EXE, FSERVICE.EXE, etc.), and CSFCDROMDIR should point to the directory that contains the FixPak files (with the FIX directory). Also make sure that all the files listed in Section 2 are in your FixTool file directory. - Error message: No source drive is available. Explanation: The FixTool first checks for removable drives on the system. If there are no removable drives, you will get this error message if you have not set the CSFCDROMDIR to point to a valid hard drive or LAN drive. Solution: Set the CSFCDROMDIR to point to the drive and directory that contain the FixPak files. - Error message: Checksum error in <file>. Explanation: The FixTool checks the checksum of the source media with a checksum that was recorded when the FixPak was created. If these values do not match, you will receive this error. Solution: This indicates that the FixPak media is bad. Download the FixPak again and re-create the FixPak diskettes, or get another FixPak CD. Then reinstall the FixPak. The FixTool will resume, starting at the point where it stopped. - Error message: The path SET CSFCDROMDIR=<path\filename> does not exist or is invalid. Explanation: FixTool could not find the FIX directory in the path given in the SET CSFCDROMDIR statement. Solution: Check to make sure the path given in the SET CSFCDROMDIR statement is pointing to the directory that contains the FixPak. This directory should contain all the files and directories included in the FixPak. Here are some common error messages that you might see when running FSERVICE. - Error message: CSF257: No product has been selected. Explanation: This error message is reported in several situations. You may not have selected a product to service in the RESPONSE.FIL, or FSERVICE may not have found any products to service. If FSERVICE didn't find any products to service, either the product information on the system did not match the product information in the FixPak, or FSERVICE determined that the FixPak would back-level the system. Solution: Check the prerequisites for the FixPak and make sure that the system contains the proper pre-requisites. Also, be sure that the FixPak you are trying to install is being applied to the appropriate product. If the product information is incorrect, you may need to copy the product SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media. - Error message: This portion of service has completed. Reboot your system before applying additional service or using the product to process files that were locked during service. Explanation: This appears as a red screen with a title of "Corrective Service Facility Fatal Error," but the message may not indicate an error. Please view the service.log file by pressing Enter. This screen appears after doing a backout with FSERVICE so that you can check the log file to make sure there are no errors before you reboot your system. Solution: Make sure that there are no errors logged and then press Ctrl-Break to exit service. If there were no errors in the log file, then FSERVICE completed successfully and it's safe to reboot your system. - Error message: Error reading file <path>\IBMCSFLK.DLL. Explanation: FixTool could not find the files needed for servicing. Solution: Make sure that all the files listed in Section 2 are in the directory (or on the diskette) with the FixTool files. Also, make sure your /S: parameter path is valid. It should contain the FixPak files with the FIX directory. Sometimes you may need to include the /S: parameter--even if you have set SOURCE properly in the response file. ****************************************************************************** Section 12. Other Known Problems The following problems have also been encountered: - When using SERVICE, one of the panels contains a Reboot button that no longer is needed. This button was used when you wanted to reboot from the CSF boot diskettes, but the CSF boot diskettes are no longer available. You should select Continue, or you can select Cancel and reboot the system using boot diskettes for that product. - BOOTOS2 induced problem. BOOTOS2 (corrected in latest version) copied the SYSLEVEL.OS2 file from the booted partition which was used to create the BOOTOS2 partition to the new partition. This SYSLEVEL.OS2 file could have had default service directories that included drive letters in it. Since BOOTOS2 copied the file to a different partition, the wrong drive letter would be specified for the FixTool to use when looking for files to be serviced. The SYSLEVEL.OS2 normally would have default directories in it after one had applied service to a partition, or possibly after the system install. The net result here is that if you had a SYSLEVEL.OS2 file with default directories in it, then created a BOOTOS2 partition, and later tried to service the BOOTOS2 partition, the FixTool not only would apply service to the BOOTOS2 partition, but the default directories in the SYSLEVEL.OS2 file as well (the partition where the SYSLEVEL.OS2 came from). The solution here is to copy the SYSLEVEL.OS2 from your distribution diskette or CD into OS2\INSTALL directory of the BOOTOS2 partition before applying service to that partition. | - A trap can occur if you include an unformatted drive for the archive | directory. This occurs even if you format the drive in a different | session before the FixTool processes any files for archiving. This | happens because the FixTool scans for formatted drives at the beginning | of the program and creates a list of possible drives, which is not added | to during subsequent processing. | The solution is to make sure that you have a valid, formatted drive | given for the ARCHIVE directory BEFORE the FixTool starts. If not, you | must stop and then restart the FixTool once the drive is valid. | - If your drive C: is formatted with NTFS or FAT32, you may get the following | error message: "An error occurred. The reason may be old or corrupt CSF | logfiles, CSF_SEL.000 file, or file system corruption." This is a general | error message that's returned when an unexpected return code is encountered. | The error is sent because the FixTool searches for the FIXSTART file on C:, | and therefore needs a C: partition that contains data it can read, such as | FAT or HPFS. | The solution is to create a dummy C: partition that's formatted FAT or HPFS. | Try to boot to that C: partition (which will fail, but allows it to remain | the active C: partition). Then boot OS/2 and install the FixPak. | Finally, boot to the other C: partition, which will make it the default C: | drive. ****************************************************************************** Section 13. List of Changes Made for Each Version (1.38 and Later) This section gives a description of what changes have been made for the new versions of the FixTool (Version 1.38 and later). | NOTE: FixTool 1.41 and FixTool 1.37B are the only supported FixTools. | FixTool 1.41 supersedes all FixTools. FixTool 1.37B can | continue to be used only on FixPaks that it was released with. | All other FixPaks should use FixTool 1.41. | Changes Made in Version 1.41 | | - Added the ability to include a timestamp in the SERVICE.LOG file. | | - Enhanced the performance when installing from diskettes. | | - Copy packed files to a temporary directory on the hard drive and then | run checksum and unpack against the files on the temporary directory. | An additional 1.1 MB is required for this processing. The drive used for | this is the one with the most available space. | | - Fixed error that occurred when C: is the CD-ROM drive. CSF_SEL.000 and | FIXSTART will be written to the first non-removable, non-network drive | on the system. | | - Changed Backout routine so that any CSBKExxx.EXE exit routines will run | last, after the syslevel files are updated and the files are backed out. | | - Updated FILEFIX.DLL to detect invalid release numbers. These must be | between 1 and 255. Also, this file was updated to not return a mismatch | when the file versions are the same. Changes Made in Version 1.40 - Fixes a commit problem introduced with FixTool 1.38. If you committed an OS/2 base FixPak with Version 1.38 or 1.39, you cannot install subsequent FixPaks without reverting to a SYSLEVEL.OS2 file used prior to the commit (you can use the SYSLEVEL.OS2 that was shipped with the product from the product diskettes/CD). After you had done a commit, applied a FP to the committed base, and then either restored from the commit Archive or backed out an installed FP, the fact that the base was at a specific FixPak level was lost. The FixTool will now create in OS2\INSTALL a file named FPCOMMIT.OS2 to hold the base committed SYSLEVEL. This will be restored to SYSLEVEL.OS2 during either of these 2 restore activities. Do not erase this file. - Eliminates a SYS0039 error when using SERVICE without a diskette in the drive when starting the FixTool. - Allows you to set a new CSFDRIVEAPPLY environment variable prior to running SERVICE which will limit the search for products to be serviced to the drive given in the set statement and to the boot drive. - Includes an updated FPINST.CMD file that uses the /B: parameter for LAN-related FixPak installations. - Includes an updated UNPACK2.EXE and updated error handling for messages coming from UNPACK2.EXE. - Includes checksum verification on the source media. This fix prevents corrupted source files from being transferred to the target system. You may also notice a slight increase in the time it takes to process files to be updated. - Includes an ARCHCTL utility that allows you to turn off archive processing for a particular FixPak. Changes Made in Version 1.39 - Works with OS/2 Warp v3.0 and LAN-related FixPaks. The backout- to-backup process was fixed for LAN-related FixPaks. - The CSFUTILPATH environment variable does not have to be set to be able to run SERVICE from a hard drive. - Now services systems that do not have a removable media drive. - Contains an updated response file for Warp 4 systems. Changes Made in Version 1.38 NOTE: Version 1.38 of the FixTool was for use with OS/2 Warp v4.0 systems only. - Updates the CSD level in the SYSLEVEL.xxx file for all products. The CSD level is updated to match the FixPak number. - Recognizes Software Choice installed features. When backing out a FixPak, you will be given a chance to cancel the backout if a Software Choice installed feature will be broken by the FixPak backout. - No longer uses CSF boot diskettes. The FixTool now comes as a self-extracting zip file that can be unzipped to a single diskette. - Places the locked file device driver statements closer to the beginning of the CONFIG.SYS. - Corrects a problem with the backout-to-backup process when a file is serviced in more than one directory.
 service.boulder.ibm.com/ps/products/os2/fixtool/english-us/cs_141.exe
Corrective Service facility v. 2-B 1.40 (10/2/1999) Readme/What's new
Readme for Corrective Service Facility 2-B Version 1.40 **************************** This readme file describes the features available with Version 1.40 of the Corrective Service Facility (referred to in this document as the FixTool). Once you use this version of the FixTool to service a product, you will not be able to use Version 1.37B or earlier. SYSLEVEL files are modified by FixTool 1.38 and later, causing FixTool 1.37B or earlier not to find products to service. This document supplements the information given in the README.INF that comes with the FixTool. The README.INF includes more details about the FixTool process. CONTENTS: Section 1. How to Tell What FixTool Version You Have Section 2. Files Included in the FixTool EXE File Section 3. How to Use the FixTool EXE (Zip) File Section 4. How to Apply Service Section 5. How to Set Up the FixTool for Remote Installation Section 6. How to Customize the Response File Section 7. How to Turn Off Archiving for a FixPak Section 8. Setting Environment Variables Section 9. If You Have a Problem Section 10. Common Error Messages Section 11. Other Known Problems Section 12. List of Changes Made for Each Version (1.38 and Later) ================================================ Section 1. How to Tell What FixTool Version You Have You can tell if you have Version 1.40 by running BLDLEVEL on SERVICE.EXE or FSERVICE.EXE. You will see one of the following, depending on which version of BLDLEVEL.EXE you have. Signature: @#IBM:F.140#@ OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 Vendor: IBM Revision: 0.140 File Version: 0.140 Description: OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 Signature: @#IBM:F.140#@ OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 Vendor: IBM Revision: F.140 Description: OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 The new version of the FixTool (Corrective Service Facility) updates the current CSD field in the SYSLEVEL files of the products it services. After applying a FixPak with Version 1.40, you will be able to run SYSLEVEL and tell what FixPaks you have applied by looking at the current field of the product's SYSLEVEL file. This version is also compatible with Software Choice features. If you need to use Software Choice to install new features for a product, the FixTool will integrate SYSLEVEL and archive information from the Software Choice install the next time it services that product. Section 2. Files Included in the FixTool EXE File The following files are included in the FixTool EXE (Zip) file: File Use -------------- ----------------------------------------------------------- BUILD.LVL Contains build information for this FixTool release. CSFPANS.DLL Used by FSERVICE SERVICE.EXE Executable for applying service through a windowed session SERVICE.HLP SERVICE help file SHPIINST.DLL FixTool required DLL UNPACK.EXE Used to unpack files being serviced UNPACK2.EXE Used to unpack files being serviced VIOCALLS.DLL FixTool required DLL FSERVICE.EXE Executable for applying service through a command line (used with a response file). IBMCSFLK.DLL Locked file device driver file IBMCSFLK.EXE Locked file device driver file IBMCSFLK.SYS Locked file device driver file IBMCSFLK.MSG Locked file device driver file PACK.EXE Used to pack files being archived or backed up README.INF General Installation instructions for the FixTool RESPONSE.LAN Response file for servicing network-related products RESPONSE.WP3 Response file for servicing OS/2 Warp v3 base RESPONSE.WP4 Response file for servicing OS/2 Warp v4 base FSERVICE.MSG FSERVICE message file FPINST.CMD Command file for applying service through FSERVICE (uses standard response files for OS/2 Warp 3, OS/2 Warp 4, and network-related FixPaks) NLS.DLL FixTool required DLL MSG.DLL FixTool required DLL FILEFIX.DLL FixTool required DLL ARCHCTL.CMD Command file that allows you to turn off archiving for a particular FixPak. READ.ME This file Section 3. How to Use the FixTool EXE (Zip) File First, unzip the FixTool zip file onto a diskette or into a directory. You can do this by copying the self-extracting zip file into a new subdirectory and then use the following commands from an OS/2 command prompt: <d>: cd <directory> CSx140 <target> where <d> is the drive that you've put the FixTool zip file on, <directory> is the directory that you've copied the self-extracting zip file to. x Country code, where '_' is the US country code. Other NLV country codes are identical to the Country code used in FixPak's. <target> is the fully qualified path where the file is to be unzipped to. If <target> is not a diskette, you can also copy all the files in <target> onto a diskette, except for CSx140.EXE if you wish. Next, you need OS/2 boot capability. For this, you can use any of the following: - boot the install diskettes for the product you're servicing - create utility diskettes from your system and boot these - use a maintenance partition if you have one - boot through Alt-F1 and go to the command prompt - boot OS/2 as usual and then open an OS/2 session Section 4. How to Apply Service Once you have boot capability (see Section 3) and are at a command prompt, you can apply service using one of the following methods: Using FPINST Using SERVICE Using FSERVICE with a custom RESPONSE.FIL Insert the FixTool diskette you created, or change to the directory that the FixTool is in, and then use FPINST or FSERVICE as described in Sections 4.1 and 4.3. To use SERVICE as described in Section 4.2, you must have OS/2 running without having booted from diskettes, maintenance partition, or via Alt-F1. 4.1. Using FPINST To use FPINST, change to the diskette or directory where you have FPINST.CMD and the related files, and type FPINST fixpak_type <boot_drive> where fixpak_type is WARP3 for OS/2 Warp Version 3.0 FixPak installs, WARP4 for OS/2 Warp Version 4.0 FixPak installs, or NETWORK for LAN or network-related FixPak installs, and <boot_drive> is an optional parameter that is only valid when fixpak_type is NETWORK. This is the boot drive of the system. This restricts the application of FixPaks to specific drives on systems where more than one OS/2 system is applied. FPINST uses FSERVICE with a standard response file. For OS/2 Base FixPaks, the response file saves an archive copy of the files it services in <boot_drive>:\ARCHIVE. For LAN or network-related FixPaks, there is no archive or backup created. If you want to keep a backup with network-related FixPaks, use SERVICE or use FSERVICE with a custom RESPONSE.FIL. See Section 6 for more information on customizing a response file. 4.2. Using SERVICE To use SERVICE, go to the diskette or directory where you have SERVICE.EXE and the related files. Then type SERVICE The program will prompt you for required inputs. See README.INF for more information about these panels. With FixTool Version 1.39 or later, the CSFUTILPATH defaults to the path that you have executed SERVICE from, so you do not need to set this environment variable if all the FixTool files are in the same directory with SERVICE.EXE. NOTE: To use SERVICE, you must have the OS/2 PM Shell running. You cannot run SERVICE if you have booted from install diskettes or if you pressed Alt-F1 to get to a command prompt. 4.3. Using FSERVICE To use FSERVICE from a diskette, copy your customized RESPONSE.FIL to the diskette with the FixTool files, then go to the diskette and type FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL If you have copied the FixTool files into a directory, you need to use the following command from the directory with FSERVICE.EXE and the related files (including your custom RESPONSE.FIL): FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL /S:<d>:\<directory> where <d> is the drive with the FixTool related files and <directory> is the directory structure where you put the FixTool files. There are optional parameters that can be included on the FSERVICE command line. See the README.INF file for more details about these parameters. You should use the /B:<drive> parameter with FSERVICE when applying LAN FixPaks on systems with more than one OS/2 boot partition. <drive> is the OS/2 boot partition to be serviced. Section 5. How to Set Up the FixTool for Remote Installation If you want to speed up FixPak installation or setup a FixPak on a LAN drive for use by others (Redirected Install), follow these steps. Before you begin, I strongly recommend you go install a Virtual Floppy Disk program like SVDISK (Super Virtual Disk) or VFDISK (Virtual Floppy Disk). Go to a Web site and search on "virtual floppy" to locate. In the following examples, d: is the work drive and j: is the Virtual Floppy drive. Replace this with whatever drive letters you need to use. xr_w035 is the FixPak we are working with. First, setup a directory to hold the FixTool code. For example, run CS_140.EXE D:\CSF to place the FixTool into the target directory. Next, setup the FixPak directory using the diskette images. loaddskf xr_w035.1dk j: /f/y/q xcopy j: d:\xr_w035\ /h/o/t/s/e/r/v loaddskf xr_w035.2dk j: /f/y/q xcopy j: d:\xr_w035\ /h/o/t/s/e/r/v ... ... ... ... repeat for each disk image in the FixPak Install the FixPak by running service.exe. set csfutilpath=d:\csf set csfcdromdir=d:\xr_w035 d: cd csf service (or start service) You can also apply service by running fservice.exe with a response file. d: cd csf fservice /r:d:\csf\response.wp3 /s:d:\xr_w035 This will apply the FixPak to all serviceable partitions. If you want to make the response file specific to a partition (drive) then you need to change the :SYSLEVEL and :ARCHIVE lines in response.wp3: :SYSLEVEL \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVE -- to -- :SYSLEVEL x:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE x:\ARCHIVE where x: is the drive you want serviced. Section 6. How to Customize the Response File There are three standard response files included with the FixTool that can be modified for your configuration needs. To modify a response file, copy one of the standard response files (RESPONSE.WP3, RESPONSE.WP4, or RESPONSE.LAN) to a file called RESPONSE.FIL. Modify the RESPONSE.FIL as needed, and then run FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL. The following sections show a few of the service actions you can take through a response file. For more information about response files, view the README.INF file that comes with the FixTool. 6.1. Applying Service to a Product Without an Existing Archive This response file can be used to apply service for the first time using FSERVICE when there is no existing archive of the product being serviced. It will service all partitions and place an archive in each partition. It does not take a backup of changed files. In this case, the SERVICE.LOG file will go into the C:\OS2\INSTALL directory. Files that are read-only, hidden, system, or newer will be replaced automatically during service. The FixPak source files are on A:. The FixTool will service all partitions where \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 and \MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM are found, and it will save the original files in an \ARCHIVE directory for each partition serviced. Note that the :LOGFILE tag is optional and may be overridden by using the /L: parameter on the FSERVICE command line. The :FLAGS and :SOURCE tags are also optional, but if used, the :SERVICE tag must be included. The :SOURCE tag can be overridden by using the /S: parameter on the FSERVICE command line. You should include a :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, and :ARCHIVE tag for each product to be serviced. Note that the :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, and :ARCHIVE tags must appear in the order shown in this example. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED REPLACE_NEWER :SOURCE A:\ :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVE :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL \MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVEM For OS/2 Warp 4 systems, the multimedia lines are not needed in the response file. So, the last three lines in the previous example should be removed or commented out of the response file for OS/2 Warp 4.0. 6.2. Applying Service to a Product With an Existing Archive This response file can be used to apply service using FSERVICE when there is an existing archive of the product being serviced. This demonstrates the ability to take a backup of changed files. Notice that each product serviced must be backed up to a different directory, so the drive must be explicitly defined in the :SYSLEVEL, :ARCHIVE, and :BACKUP lines. Also note the order of the :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, :ARCHIVE, and :BACKUP tags. These tags must appear in this order. The :BACKUP tag is optional. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED REPLACE_NEWER :SOURCE A:\ :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE C:\ARCHIVE :BACKUP C:\BACKUP :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE C:\ARCHIVEM :BACKUP C:\BACKUPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, the last four lines are not needed in the response file. 6.3. Backing Out to the Archive Level of a Product This is a sample response file to be used when backing out to the archive level of a product. Note that you can only use one :TARGET tag in the response file. Also note that the :TARGET tag must appear before a :BACKOUT tag is used. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :TARGET ARCHIVE :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, you do not need to include the last two lines of this example in your response file. 6.4. Backing Out to the Backup Level of a Product This is a sample response file to be used when backing out to the backup level of a product. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :TARGET BACKUP :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, you do not need to include the last two lines of this example in your response file. 6.5. Committing a Product This is a sample response file to be used when committing a product. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :COMMIT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :COMMIT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, do not include the last two lines of this example in your response file. 6.6. Redirecting an Archive of a Product to Another Existing Archive This is a sample response file to be used when redirecting an archive of a product to another existing archive location. One example of this would be for using a shared network archive. Note that the archive directory specifies the location of an existing archive to which the current product is being redirected. In this example the arbitrary drive shows S:, which may be a LAN drive. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :REDIRECT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE S:\ARCHIVE :REDIRECT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE S:\ARCHIVEM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, do not include the last three lines of this example in your response file. Section 7. How to Turn Off Archiving for a FixPak FixTool 1.40 includes a new utility, ARCHCTL.CMD, that allows you to turn off the archiving feature of a FixPak. This is especially useful if you have already tested a FixPak in a controlled environment and are convinced that there will be no need to backout the FixPak to an original product level. With archiving turned off, you may include a backup directory and backup to your previous level if desired. But you will not be able to back up more than one level. For example, if you install OS/2 Base FixPak 8 with archiving turned off and include a backup directory, then when you install FixPak 9, the backup directory for FixPak 8 is deleted. If you do not include a backup directory with archiving turned off, there is no way to back up to a previous level. The syntax for the ARCHCTL utility is as follows: ARCHCTL ON|OFF fixpak_source where ON|OFF indicates the action to perform. ON enables archiving; OFF disables it. fixpak_source is normally the drive with the first FixPak diskette, but it can also be the root of the FixPak when copied to the hard disk (where the \FIX subdirectory is located). The default for OS/2 FixPaks is ON. The default for LAN FixPaks is OFF. Examples for turning archiving OFF: Example 1. 1. Place first FixPak diskette in A: 2. Enter ARCHCTL OFF A: Example 2. 1. XCOPY all FixPak diskette data to N:\FIXES\FP32 2. Enter ARCHCTL OFF N:\FIXES\FP32 Examples for turning archiving ON: Example 3. 1. Place first FixPak diskette in A: 2. Enter ARCHCTL ON A: Example 4. 1. XCOPY all FixPak diskette data to N:\FIXES\FP32 2. Enter ARCHCTL ON N:\FIXES\FP32 Section 8. Setting Environment Variables There are several SET statements that set environment variables for the FixTool to use. See the table below for a list of these variables and a description of what they do. Environment Variable Usage ------------------------------- ----------------------------------- SET CSFUTILPATH=path Allows you to run SERVICE or FSERVICE from your hard drive or from a redirected drive. SET CSFCDROMDIR=path Allows you to install a FixPak from a redirected drive or CD-ROM. All of the FixPak files should be in this path. This path should NOT be pointing to a floppy (or virtual floppy) drive. SET REMOTE_INSTALL_STATE=0|1 If this variable is set to 0, then upon termination FixTool returns control to the calling process. SET CSFDRIVEAPPLY=d Allows you to restrict service to products found only on drive d and on the boot drive. Section 9. If You Have a Problem If the FixPak does not install properly, there are files you can look in to find out what error occurred. The SERVICE.LOG file is the first place to look. The FixTool puts it in the directory where the SYSLEVEL file of the product being serviced is located. Section 10. Common Error Messages Here are some common error messages that you may receive when running SERVICE. - Error message: An error occurred while searching for files to update. The reason may be old or corrupt CSF logfiles, CSF_SEL.000 file, or file system corruption. See README file for more information. Explanation #1: You may get this if you have used the new FixTool (version 1.38 or later) to install a FixPak, and then try to use an old version of the FixTool (version 1.37B or earlier). Solution #1: If you are installing a LAN FixPak, you can delete all the LOGF0000.xxx and LOGSTART.xxx files on your system, and reapply the FixPak. If you are installing an OS/2 FixPak, you will also need to copy your original SYSLEVEL.OS2 file back into the \OS2\INSTALL directory. Explanation #2: You may also get this error if you are trying to service a system that has many syslevel files (over about 150) on all drives. Solution #2: If your system has a large number of syslevel files, you may have to limit the search for products to be serviced by using the following set statement before you run SERVICE: SET CSFDRIVEAPPLY=d where d is the drive you wish to service. This statement limits the search for serviceable products to one drive at a time in addition to the boot drive. This will get the number of files opened down to a workable level. - Error message: No products were found on the target system to service. Explanation #1: Your SYSLEVEL.xxx file does not contain the proper prerequisite FixPak number or product information. In order to install a FixPak, the number of the FixPak must be higher than the number of the current CSD in the SYSLEVEL.xxx file, or the product information must match. Solution #1: Check the prerequisites needed for the FixPak you are trying to install. Some FixPaks have a particular FixPak that must be installed prior to installing that FixPak. Also, make sure that the FixPak you are trying to install is one that may be applied to that product. If the product information is incorrect, you may need to copy the product SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media. Explanation #2: If you have committed an OS/2 base FixPak with Version 1.38 or Version 1.39, you may get this message when you try to install another FixPak. Solution #2: Copy the product's SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media or from a backup copy that was made prior to committing the FixPak. - Error message: The path <path\filename> does not exist or is invalid. Explanation: FixTool could not unpack the file specified in the message, or it could not unpack the file just prior to the file specified in the message. Solution: This indicates that the FixPak media is bad. You should download the FixPak again, re-create the FixPak diskettes, and then re-install the FixPak. The FixTool will resume, starting at the point where it stopped. If you get RC=109 in the service.log, the file listed prior to the first RC=109 is probably giving an unpack error. The modules that received the 109 error were not updated properly. Make sure that you are using the UNPACK2.EXE that comes with this version of the FixTool. You should also download the FixPak again and re-create the FixPak diskettes. Then reinstall the FixPak from the new media. The FixTool will resume, updating any files that were not originally updated. If this does not fix the problem, please contact your service representative. - Error message: Error reading file <path>\IBMCSFLK.DLL. Explanation: FixTool could not find the files needed for servicing. Solution: Make sure that you've set the CSFUTILPATH and CSFCDROMDIR environment variables if you're running service from a hard drive. The CSFUTILPATH should point to the directory that contains the FixTool files (SERVICE.EXE, FSERVICE.EXE, etc.), and CSFCDROMDIR should point to the directory that contains the FixPak files (with the FIX directory). Also make sure that all the files listed in Section 2 are in your FixTool file directory. - Error message: No source drive is available. Explanation: The FixTool first checks for removable drives on the system. If there are no removable drives, you will get this error message if you have not set the CSFCDROMDIR to point to a valid hard drive or LAN drive. Solution: Set the CSFCDROMDIR to point to the drive and directory that contain the FixPak files. - Error message: Checksum error in <file>. Explanation: The FixTool checks the checksum of the source media with a checksum that was recorded when the FixPak was created. If these values do not match, you will receive this error. Solution: This indicates that the FixPak media is bad. Download the FixPak again and re-create the FixPak diskettes, or get another FixPak CD. Then reinstall the FixPak. The FixTool will resume, starting at the point where it stopped. - Error message: The path SET CSFCDROMDIR=<path\filename> does not exist or is invalid. Explanation: FixTool could not find the FIX directory in the path given in the SET CSFCDROMDIR statement. Solution: Check to make sure the path given in the SET CSFCDROMDIR statement is pointing to the directory that contains the FixPak. This directory should contain all the files and directories included in the FixPak. Here are some common error messages that you might see when running FSERVICE. - Error message: CSF257: No product has been selected. Explanation: This error message is reported in several situations. You may not have selected a product to service in the RESPONSE.FIL, or FSERVICE may not have found any products to service. If FSERVICE didn't find any products to service, either the product information on the system did not match the product information in the FixPak, or FSERVICE determined that the FixPak would back-level the system. Solution: Check the prerequisites for the FixPak and make sure that the system contains the proper pre-requisites. Also, be sure that the FixPak you are trying to install is being applied to the appropriate product. If the product information is incorrect, you may need to copy the product SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media. - Error message: This portion of service has completed. Reboot your system before applying additional service or using the product to process files that were locked during service. Explanation: This appears as a red screen with a title of "Corrective Service Facility Fatal Error," but the message may not indicate an error. Please view the service.log file by pressing Enter. This screen appears after doing a backout with FSERVICE so that you can check the log file to make sure there are no errors before you reboot your system. Solution: Make sure that there are no errors logged and then press Ctrl-Break to exit service. If there were no errors in the log file, then FSERVICE completed successfully and it's safe to reboot your system. - Error message: Error reading file <path>\IBMCSFLK.DLL. Explanation: FixTool could not find the files needed for servicing. Solution: Make sure that all the files listed in Section 2 are in the directory (or on the diskette) with the FixTool files. Also, make sure your /S: parameter path is valid. It should contain the FixPak files with the FIX directory. Sometimes you may need to include the /S: parameter--even if you have set SOURCE properly in the response file. Section 11. Other Known Problems The following problems have also been encountered: - When using SERVICE, one of the panels contains a Reboot button that no longer is needed. This button was used when you wanted to reboot from the CSF boot diskettes, but the CSF boot diskettes are no longer available. You should select Continue, or you can select Cancel and reboot the system using boot diskettes for that product. - BOOTOS2 induced problem. BOOTOS2 (corrected in latest version) copied the SYSLEVEL.OS2 file from the booted partition which was used to create the BOOTOS2 partition to the new partition. This SYSLEVEL.OS2 file could have had default service directories that included drive letters in it. Since BOOTOS2 copied the file to a different partition, the wrong drive letter would be specified for the FixTool to use when looking for files to be serviced. The SYSLEVEL.OS2 normally would have default directories in it after one had applied service to a partition, or possibly after the system install. The net result here is that if you had a SYSLEVEL.OS2 file with default directories in it, then created a BOOTOS2 partition, and later tried to service the BOOTOS2 partition, the FixTool not only would apply service to the BOOTOS2 partition, but the default directories in the SYSLEVEL.OS2 file as well (the partition where the SYSLEVEL.OS2 came from). The solution here is to copy the SYSLEVEL.OS2 from your distribution diskette or CD into OS2\INSTALL directory of the BOOTOS2 partition before applying service to that partition. Section 12. List of Changes Made for Each Version (1.38 and Later) This section gives a description of what changes have been made for the new versions of the FixTool (Version 1.38 and later). NOTE: FixTool 1.40 and FixTool 1.37B are the only supported FixTools. FixTool 1.40 supersedes all FixTools. FixTool 1.37B can continue to be used only on FixPaks that it was released with. All other FixPaks should use FixTool 1.40. Section 11.1. Changes Made in Version 1.40 Version 1.40 contains all the fixes included in 1.39 as well as the following additional changes: - Fixes a commit problem introduced with FixTool 1.38. If you committed an OS/2 base FixPak with Version 1.38 or 1.39, you cannot install subsequent FixPaks without reverting to a SYSLEVEL.OS2 file used prior to the commit (you can use the SYSLEVEL.OS2 that was shipped with the product from the product diskettes/CD). After you had done a commit, applied a FP to the committed base, and then either restored from the commit Archive or backed out an installed FP, the fact that the base was at a specific FixPak level was lost. The FixTool will now create in OS2\INSTALL a file named FPCOMMIT.OS2 to hold the base committed SYSLEVEL. This will be restored to SYSLEVEL.OS2 during either of these 2 restore activities. Do not erase this file. - Eliminates a SYS0039 error when using SERVICE without a diskette in the drive when starting the FixTool. - Allows you to set a new CSFDRIVEAPPLY environment variable prior to running SERVICE which will limit the search for products to be serviced to the drive given in the set statement and to the boot drive. - Includes an updated FPINST.CMD file that uses the /B: parameter for LAN-related FixPak installations. - Includes an updated UNPACK2.EXE and updated error handling for messages coming from UNPACK2.EXE. - Includes checksum verification on the source media. This fix prevents corrupted source files from being transferred to the target system. You may also notice a slight increase in the time it takes to process files to be updated. - Includes an ARCHCTL utility that allows you to turn off archive processing for a particular FixPak. Section 11.2. Changes Made in Version 1.39 Version 1.39 contains all the fixes included in 1.38 as well as the following additional changes: - Works with OS/2 Warp v3.0 and LAN-related FixPaks. The backout- to-backup process was fixed for LAN-related FixPaks. - The CSFUTILPATH environment variable does not have to be set to be able to run SERVICE from a hard drive. - Now services systems that do not have a removable media drive. - Contains an updated response file for Warp 4 systems. Section 11.3. Changes Made in Version 1.38 NOTE: Version 1.38 of the FixTool was for use with OS/2 Warp v4.0 systems only. The following basic changes were made for Version 1.38: - Updates the CSD level in the SYSLEVEL.xxx file for all products. The CSD level is updated to match the FixPak number. - Recognizes Software Choice installed features. When backing out a FixPak, you will be given a chance to cancel the backout if a Software Choice installed feature will be broken by the FixPak backout. - No longer uses CSF boot diskettes. The FixTool now comes as a self-extracting zip file that can be unzipped to a single diskette. - Places the locked file device driver statements closer to the beginning of the CONFIG.SYS. - Corrects a problem with the backout-to-backup process when a file is serviced in more than one directory.
 service.boulder.ibm.com/ps/products/os2/fixtool/english-us/cs_140.exe
Corrective Service facility v. 2-B 1.39 (21/10/1998) Readme/What's new
Readme for Corrective Service Facility 2-B Version 1.39 **************************** This readme file describes the new features available with Version 1.39 of the Corrective Service Facility (referred to in this document as the FixTool). Once you use this version of the FixTool to service a product, you will not be able to use Version 1.37B or earlier because this version modifies SYSLEVEL files and versions prior to 1.38 did not. CONTENTS: Section 1. New Features with Version 1.39 Section 2. Files Included in the FixTool EXE File Section 3. How to Use the FixTool EXE (Zip) File Section 4. How to Apply Service Section 5. How to Set Up the FixTool for Remote Installation Section 6. How to Customize the Response File Section 7. If You Have a Problem Section 8. Setting Environment Variables Section 9. Common Error Messages ================================================ Section 1. New Features with Version 1.39 You can tell if you have Version 1.39 by running BLDLEVEL on SERVICE.EXE or FSERVICE.EXE. You will see one of the following, depending on which version of BLDLEVEL.EXE you have. Signature: @#IBM:F.139#@ OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 Vendor: IBM Revision: 0.139 File Version: 0.139 Description: OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 Signature: @#IBM:F.139#@ OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 Vendor: IBM Revision: F.139 Description: OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 The new version of the FixTool (Corrective Service Facility) updates the current CSD field in the SYSLEVEL files of the products it services. After applying a FixPak with Version 1.38, you will be able to run SYSLEVEL and tell what FixPaks you have applied by looking at the current field of the product's SYSLEVEL file. This version is also compatible with Software Choice features. If you need to use Software Choice to install new features for a product, the FixTool will integrate SYSLEVEL and archive information from the Software Choice install the next time it services that product. Section 2. Files Included in the FixTool EXE File The following files are included in the FixTool EXE (Zip) file: File Use -------------- ----------------------------------------------------------- BUILD.LVL Contains build information for this Fixtool release. CSFPANS.DLL Used by FSERVICE SERVICE.EXE Executable for applying service through a windowed session SERVICE.HLP SERVICE help file SHPIINST.DLL FixTool required DLL UNPACK.EXE Used to unpack files being serviced UNPACK2.EXE Used to unpack files being serviced VIOCALLS.DLL FixTool required DLL FSERVICE.EXE Executable for applying service through a command line (used with a response file). IBMCSFLK.DLL Locked file device driver file IBMCSFLK.EXE Locked file device driver file IBMCSFLK.SYS Locked file device driver file IBMCSFLK.MSG Locked file device driver file PACK.EXE Used to pack files being archived or backed up README.INF General Installation instructions for the FixTool RESPONSE.LAN Response file for servicing network-related products RESPONSE.WP3 Response file for servicing OS/2 Warp v3 base RESPONSE.WP4 Response file for servicing OS/2 Warp v4 base FSERVICE.MSG FSERVICE message file FPINST.CMD Command file for applying service through FSERVICE (uses standard response files for OS/2 Warp 3, OS/2 Warp 4, and network-related FixPaks) NLS.DLL FixTool required DLL MSG.DLL FixTool required DLL FILEFIX.DLL FixTool required DLL READ.ME This file Section 3. How to Use the FixTool EXE (Zip) File First, unzip the FixTool zip file onto a diskette or into a directory. You can do this by copying the self-extracting zip file into a new subdirectory and then use the following commands from an OS/2 command prompt: <d>: cd <directory> CSx139 <target> where <d> is the drive that you've put the FixTool zip file on, <directory> is the directory that you've copied the self-extracting zip file to. x Country code, where '_' is the US country code. Other NLV country codes are identical to the Country code used in FixPak's. <target> is the fully qualified path where the file is to be unzipped to. If <target> is not a diskette, you can also copy all the files in <target> onto a diskette, except for CSx139.EXE if you wish. Next, you need OS/2 boot capability. For this, you can use any of the following: - boot the install diskettes for the product you're servicing - create utility diskettes from your system and boot these - use a maintenance partition if you have one - boot through Alt-F1 and go to the command prompt - boot OS/2 as usual and then open an OS/2 session Section 4. How to Apply Service Once you have boot capability (see Section 3) and are at a command prompt, you can apply service using one of the following methods: Using FPINST Using SERVICE Using FSERVICE with a custom RESPONSE.FIL Insert the FixTool diskette you created, and then use FPINST or FSERVICE as described in Sections 4.1 and 4.3. To use SERVICE as described in Section 4.2, you must have OS/2 running without having booted from diskettes, maintenance partition, or via Alt-F1. 4.1. Using FPINST To use FPINST, go to the diskette or directory where you have FPINST.CMD and the related files, and type FPINST <fixpak_type> where <fixpak_type> is WARP3 for OS/2 Warp Version 3.0 FixPak installs, WARP4 for OS/2 Warp Version 4.0 FixPak installs, or NETWORK for LAN or network-related FixPak installs This uses FSERVICE with a standard response file. For OS/2 Base FixPaks, the response file saves an archive copy of the files it services in <boot_drive>:\ARCHIVE. For LAN or network-related FixPaks, there is no archive or backup created. If you want to keep a backup with network-related FixPaks, use SERVICE or use FSERVICE with a custom RESPONSE.FIL. See Section 6 for more information on customizing a response file. 4.2. Using SERVICE To use SERVICE, go to the diskette or directory where you have SERVICE.EXE and the related files. Then type SERVICE The program will prompt you for required inputs. See README.INF for more information about these panels. With version 1.39 of the FixTool, the CSFUTILPATH defaults to the path that you have executed SERVICE from, so you do not need to set this environment variable if all the FixTool files are in the same directory with SERVICE.EXE. NOTE: To use SERVICE, you must have the OS/2 PM Shell running. You cannot run SERVICE if you have booted from install diskettes or if you pressed Alt-F1 to get to a command prompt. 4.3. Using FSERVICE To use FSERVICE from a diskette, copy your customized RESPONSE.FIL to the diskette with the FixTool files, then go to the diskette and type FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL If you have copied the FixTool files into a directory, you need to use the following command from the directory with FSERVICE.EXE and the related files (including your custom RESPONSE.FIL): FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL /S:<d>:\<directory> where <d> is the drive with the FixTool-related files and <directory> is the directory structure where you put the FixTool files. There are optional parameters that can be included on the FSERVICE command line. See the README.INF file for more details about these parameters. Section 5. How to Set Up the FixTool for Remote Installation If you want to speed up FixPak installation or setup a FixPak on a LAN drive for use by others (Redirected Install), follow these steps. Before you begin, I strongly recommend you go install a Virtual Floppy Disk program like SVDISK (Super Virtual Disk) or VFDISK (Virtual Floppy Disk). Go to a Web site and search on "virtual floppy" to locate. In the following examples, d: is the work drive and j: is the Virtual Floppy drive. Replace this with whatever drive letters you need to use. xr_w035 is the FixPak we are working with. First, setup a directory to hold the Fixtool code. For example, run CS_139.EXE D:\CSF to place the FixTool into the target directory. Next, setup the FixPak directory using the diskette images. loaddskf xr_w035.1dk j: /f/y/q xcopy j: d:\xr_w035\ /h/o/t/s/e/r/v loaddskf xr_w035.2dk j: /f/y/q xcopy j: d:\xr_w035\ /h/o/t/s/e/r/v ... ... ... ... repeat for each disk image in the FixPak Install the FixPak by running service.exe. set csfutilpath=d:\csf set csfcdromdir=d:\xr_w035 d: cd csf service (or start service) You can also apply service by running fservice.exe with a response file. d: cd csf fservice /r:d:\csf\response.wp3 /s:d:\xr_w035 This will apply the FixPak to all servicable partitions. If you want to make the response file specific to a partition (drive) then you need to change the :SYSLEVEL and :ARCHIVE lines in response.wp3: :SYSLEVEL \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVE -- to -- :SYSLEVEL x:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE x:\ARCHIVE where x: is the drive you want serviced. Section 6. How to Customize the Response File There are three standard response files included with the FixTool that can be modified for your configuration needs. To modify a response file, copy one of the standard response files (RESPONSE.WP3, RESPONSE.WP4, or RESPONSE.LAN) to a file called RESPONSE.FIL. Modify the RESPONSE.FIL as needed, and then run FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL. The following sections show a few of the service actions you can take through a response file. For more information about response files, view the README.INF file that comes with the FixTool. 6.1. Applying Service to a Product Without an Existing Archive This response file can be used to apply service for the first time using FSERVICE when there is no existing archive of the product being serviced. It will service all partitions and place an archive in each partition. It does not take a backup of changed files. In this case, the SERVICE.LOG file will go into the C:\OS2\INSTALL directory. Files that are read-only, hidden, system, or newer will be replaced automatically during service. The FixPak source files are on A:. The FixTool will service all partitions where \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 and \MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM are found, and it will save the original files in an \ARCHIVE directory for each partition serviced. Note that the :LOGFILE tag is optional and may be overridden by using the /L: parameter on the FSERVICE command line. The :FLAGS and :SOURCE tags are also optional, but if used, the :SERVICE tag must be included. The :SOURCE tag can be overridden by using the /S: parameter on the FSERVICE command line. You should include a :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, and :ARCHIVE tag for each product to be serviced. Note that the :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, and :ARCHIVE tags must appear in the order shown in this example. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED REPLACE_NEWER :SOURCE A:\ :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVE :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL \MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVEM For OS/2 Warp 4 systems, the multimedia lines are not needed in the response file. So, the last three lines in the previous example should be removed or commented out of the response file for OS/2 Warp 4.0. 6.2. Applying Service to a Product With an Existing Archive This response file can be used to apply service using FSERVICE when there is an existing archive of the product being serviced. This demonstrates the ability to take a backup of changed files. Notice that each product serviced must be backed up to a different directory, so the drive must be explicitly defined in the :SYSLEVEL, :ARCHIVE, and :BACKUP lines. Also note the order of the :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, :ARCHIVE, and :BACKUP tags. These tags must appear in this order. The :BACKUP tag is optional. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED REPLACE_NEWER :SOURCE A:\ :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE C:\ARCHIVE :BACKUP C:\BACKUP :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE C:\ARCHIVEM :BACKUP C:\BACKUPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, the last four lines are not needed in the response file. 6.3. Backing Out to the Archive Level of a Product This is a sample response file to be used when backing out to the archive level of a product. Note that you can only use one :TARGET tag in the response file. Also note that the :TARGET tag must appear before a :BACKOUT tag is used. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :TARGET ARCHIVE :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, you do not need to include the last two lines of this example in your response file. 6.4. Backing Out to the Backup Level of a Product This is a sample response file to be used when backing out to the backup level of a product. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :TARGET BACKUP :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, you do not need to include the last two lines of this example in your response file. 6.5. Committing a Product This is a sample response file to be used when committing a product. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :COMMIT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :COMMIT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, do not include the last two lines of this example in your response file. 6.6. Redirecting an Archive of a Product to Another Existing Archive This is a sample response file to be used when redirecting an archive of a product to another existing archive location. One example of this would be for using a shared network archive. Note that the archive directory specifies the location of an existing archive to which the current product is being redirected. In this example the arbitrary drive shows S:, which may be a LAN drive. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :REDIRECT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE S:\ARCHIVE :REDIRECT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE S:\ARCHIVEM For OS/2 Warp 4.0, do not include the last three lines of this example in your response file. Section 7. If You Have a Problem If the FixPak does not install properly, there are files you can look in to find out what error occurred. The SERVICE.LOG file is the first place to look. The FixTool puts it in the directory where the SYSLEVEL file of the product being serviced is located. Section 8. Setting Environment Variables There are several SET statements that set environment variables for the FixTool to use. See the table below for a list of these variables and a description of what they do. Environment Variable Usage ------------------------------- ----------------------------------- SET CSFUTILPATH=path Allows you to run SERVICE or FSERVICE from your hard drive or from a redirected drive. SET CSFCDROMDIR=path Allows you to install a FixPak from a redirected drive or CD-ROM. SET REMOTE_INSTALL_STATE=0|1 If this variable is set to 0, then upon termination FixTool returns control to the calling process. Section 9. Common Error Messages Here are some common error messages that you may receive when running SERVICE. - Error message: An error occurred while searching for files to update. The reason may be old or corrupt CSF logfiles, CSF_SEL.000 file, or file system corruption. See README file for more information. Explanation: You may get this if you have used the new FixTool (version 1.38 or 1.39) to install a FixPak, and then try to use an old version of the FixTool (version 1.37B or earlier). Solution: If you are installing a LAN FixPak, you can delete all the LOGF0000.xxx and LOGSTART.xxx files on your system, and reapply the FixPak. If you are installing an OS/2 FixPak, you will also need to copy your original SYSLEVEL.OS2 file back into the \OS2\INSTALL directory. - Error message: No products were found on the target system to service. Explanation: Your SYSLEVEL.xxx file does not contain the proper prerequisite FixPak number or product information. In order to install a FixPak, the number of the FixPak must be higher than the number of the current CSD in the SYSLEVEL.xxx file, or the product information must match. Solution: Check the prerequisites needed for the FixPak you are trying to install. Some FixPaks have a particular FixPak that must be installed prior to installing that FixPak. Also, make sure that the FixPak you are trying to install is one that may be applied to that product. If the product information is incorrect, you may need to copy the product SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media. - Error message: Error reading file <path>\IBMCSFLK.DLL. Explanation: FixTool could not find the files needed for servicing. Solution: Make sure that you've set the CSFUTILPATH and CSFCDROMDIR environment variables if you're running service from a hard drive. The CSFUTILPATH should point to the directory that contains the FixTool files (SERVICE.EXE, FSERVICE.EXE, etc.), and CSFCDROMDIR should point to the directory that contains the FixPak files (with the FIX directory). Also make sure that all the files listed in Section 2 are in your FixTool file directory. - Error message: No source drive is available. Explanation: The FixTool first checks for removable drives on the system. If there are no removable drives, you will get this error message if you have not set the CSFCDROMDIR to point to a valid hard drive or LAN drive. Solution: Set the CSFCDROMDIR to point to the drive and directory that contain the FixPak files. Here are some common error messages that you might see when running FSERVICE. - Error message: CSF257: No product has been selected. Explanation: This error message is reported in several situations. You may not have selected a product to service in the RESPONSE.FIL, or FSERVICE may not have found any products to service. If FSERVICE didn't find any products to service, either the product information on the system did not match the product information in the FixPak, or FSERVICE determined that the FixPak would back-level the system. Solution: Check the prerequisites for the FixPak and make sure that the system contains the proper pre-requisites. Also, be sure that the FixPak you are trying to install is being applied to the appropriate product. If the product information is incorrect, you may need to copy the product SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media. - Error message: This portion of service has completed. Reboot your system before applying additional service or using the product to process files that were locked during service. Explanation: This appears as a red screen with a title of "Corrective Service Facility Fatal Error," but the message may not indicate an error. Please view the service.log file by pressing Enter. This screen appears after doing a backout with FSERVICE so that you can check the log file to make sure there are no errors before you reboot your system. Solution: Make sure that there are no errors logged and then press Ctrl-Break to exit service. If there were no errors in the log file, then FSERVICE completed successfully and it's safe to reboot your system. - Error message: Error reading file <path>\IBMCSFLK.DLL. Explanation: FixTool could not find the files needed for servicing. Solution: Make sure that all the files listed in Section 2 are in the directory (or on the diskette) with the FixTool files. Also, make sure your /S: parameter path is valid. It should contain the FixPak files with the FIX directory. Sometimes you may need to include the /S: parameter--even if you have set SOURCE properly in the response file.
 service.boulder.ibm.com/ps/products/os2/fixtool/english-us/cs_139.exe
Corrective Service facility v. 2-B 1.38b (20/10/1998) Readme/What's new
Readme for Corrective Service Facility 2-B Version 1.38B **************************** THIS FIXTOOL IS ONLY TO BE USED FOR WARP 4, FP 7 **************************** This readme file describes the new features available with Version 1.38B of the Corrective Service Facility (referred to in this document as the FixTool). Once you use the new version of the FixTool to service a product, you will not be able to use any previous version of the FixTool because the new version modifies SYSLEVEL files and prior versions do not. CONTENTS: Section 1. New Features with Version 1.38B Section 2. Files Included in the FixTool Zip File Section 3. How to Use the FixTool Zip File Section 4. How to Apply Service Section 5. How to Set Up the FixTool for Remote Installation Section 6. How to Customize the Response File Section 7. If You Have a Problem Section 8. Setting Environment Variables Section 9. Common Error Messages Section 10. Known Problems ================================================ Section 1. New Features with Version 1.38B You can tell if you have Version 1.38B by running BLDLEVEL on SERVICE.EXE or FSERVICE.EXE. You will see one of the following, depending on which version of BLDLEVEL.EXE you have. Signature: @#IBM:F.138B#@ OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 Vendor: IBM Revision: 0.138 File Version: 0.138 Description: OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 Signature: @#IBM:F.138B#@ OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 Vendor: IBM Revision: F.138B Description: OS/2 Corrective Service Facility (C) IBM 1994 The new version of the FixTool updates the current CSD field in the SYSLEVEL files of the products it services. After applying a FixPak with Version 1.38B, you will be able to run SYSLEVEL and tell what FixPaks you have applied by looking at the current field of the product's SYSLEVEL file. This version is also compatible with Software Choice features. If you need to use Software Choice to install new features for a product, the FixTool will integrate SYSLEVEL and archive information from the Software Choice install the next time it services that product. Section 2. Files Included in the FixTool Zip File The following files are included in the FixTool zip file: File Use -------------- ----------------------------------------------------------- BUILD.LVL Contains build information for this Fixtool release. CSFPANS.DLL Used by FSERVICE SERVICE.EXE Executable for applying service through a windowed session SERVICE.HLP SERVICE help file SHPIINST.DLL FixTool required DLL UNPACK.EXE Used to unpack files being serviced UNPACK2.EXE Used to unpack files being serviced VIOCALLS.DLL FixTool required DLL FSERVICE.EXE Executable for applying service through a command line (used with a response file). IBMCSFLK.PK@ Locked file device driver and associated files (packed file) PACK.EXE Used to pack files being archived or backed up README.INF General Installation instructions for the FixTool RESPONSE.LAN Response file for servicing network-related products RESPONSE.WP3 Response file for servicing OS/2 Warp v3 base RESPONSE.WP4 Response file for servicing OS/2 Warp v4 base CSF_KICK Identifier for the FixTool diskette FSERVICE.MSG FSERVICE message file FPINST.CMD Command file for applying service through FSERVICE (uses standard response files for OS/2 Warp 3, OS/2 Warp 4, and network-related FixPaks) NLS.DLL FixTool required DLL FILEFIX.DL@ FixTool required DLL (packed file) READ.ME This file Section 3. How to Use the FixTool Zip File First, unzip the FixTool zip file onto a diskette or into a directory. You can do this by copying the self-extracting zip file into a new subdirectory and then use the following commands from an OS/2 command prompt: <d>: cd <directory> fixt138 <target> where <d> is the drive that you've put the FixTool zip file on, <directory> is the directory that you've copied the self-extracting zip file to. <target> is the fully qualified path where the file is to be unzipped to. If <target> is not a diskette, you can also copy all the files in <target> onto a diskette, except for FIXT138.EXE if you wish. Next, you need OS/2 boot capability. For this, you can use any of the following: - boot the install diskettes for the product you're servicing - create utility diskettes from your system and boot these - use a maintenance partition if you have one - boot through Alt-F1 and go to the command prompt - boot OS/2 as usual and then open an OS/2 session Section 4. How to Apply Service Once you have boot capability (see Section 3) and are at a command prompt, you can apply service using one of the following methods: Using FPINST Using SERVICE Using FSERVICE with a custom RESPONSE.FIL Insert the FixTool diskette you created, and then use FPINST or FSERVICE as described in Sections 4.1 and 4.3. To use SERVICE as described in Section 4.2, you must have OS/2 running without having booted from diskettes, maintenance partition, or via Alt-F1. 4.1. Using FPINST To use FPINST, go to the diskette or directory where you have FPINST.CMD and the related files, and type FPINST <fixpak_type> where <fixpak_type> is WARP3 for OS/2 Warp Version 3.0 FixPak installs, WARP4 for OS/2 Warp Version 4.0 FixPak installs, or NETWORK for LAN or network-related FixPak installs This uses FSERVICE with a standard response file. For OS/2 Base FixPaks, the response file saves an archive copy of the files it services in <boot drive>:\ARCHIVE. For LAN or network-related FixPaks, there is no archive or backup created. If you want to keep a backup with network-related FixPaks, use SERVICE or use FSERVICE with a custom RESPONSE.FIL. See Section 6 for more information on customizing a response file. 4.2. Using SERVICE To use SERVICE, go to the diskette or directory where you have SERVICE.EXE and the related files. If you have copied the FixTool files to a directory, you need to use the following command to set the CSFUTILPATH environment variable. Note that CSFUTILPATH defaults to A: drive, so this step is not needed if you are using diskettes for the FixTool. SET CSFUTILPATH=<d>:\<directory> where <d> is the drive with the FixTool-related files and <directory> is the directory structure where you put the FixTool files. Then type SERVICE The program will prompt you for required inputs. See README.INF for more information about these panels. NOTE: To use SERVICE, you must have the OS/2 PM Shell running. You cannot run SERVICE if you have booted from install diskettes or if you pressed Alt-F1 to get to a command prompt. 4.3. Using FSERVICE To use FSERVICE from a diskette, copy your customized RESPONSE.FIL to the diskette with the FixTool files, then go to the diskette and type FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL If you have copied the FixTool files into a directory, you need to use the following command from the directory with FSERVICE.EXE and the related files (including your custom RESPONSE.FIL): FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL /S:<d>:\<directory> where <d> is the drive with the FixTool-related files and <directory> is the directory structure where you put the FixTool files. There are optional parameters that can be included on the FSERVICE command line. See the README.INF file for more details about these parameters. Section 5. How to Set Up the FixTool for Remote Installation If you want to speed up FixPak installation or setup a FixPak on a LAN drive for use by others (Redirected Install), follow these steps. Before you begin, I strongly recommend you go install a Virtual Floppy Disk program like SVDISK (Super Virtual Disk) or VFDISK (Virtual Floppy Disk). Go to a Web site and search on "virtual floppy" to locate. In the following examples, d: is the work drive and j: is the Virtual Floppy drive. Replace this with whatever drive letters you need to use. xr_w035 is the FixPak we are working with. First, setup a directory to hold the Fixtool code. For example, run FIXT138.EXE D:\CSF to place the FixTool into the target directory. Next, setup the FixPak directory using the diskette images. loaddskf xr_w035.1dk j: /f/y/q xcopy j: d:\xr_w035\ /h/o/t/s/e/r/v loaddskf xr_w035.2dk j: /f/y/q xcopy j: d:\xr_w035\ /h/o/t/s/e/r/v ... ... ... ... repeat for each disk image in the FixPak Install the FixPak by running service.exe. set csfutilpath=d:\csf set csfcdromdir=d:\xr_w035 d: cd csf service (or start service) You can also apply service by running fservice.exe with a response file. d: cd csf fservice /r:d:\csf\response.wp3 /s:d:\xr_w035 This will apply the FixPak to all servicable partitions. If you want to make the response file specific to a partition (drive) then you need to change the :SYSLEVEL and :ARCHIVE lines in response.wp3: :SYSLEVEL \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVE -- to -- :SYSLEVEL x:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE x:\ARCHIVE where x: is the drive you want serviced. Section 6. How to Customize the Response File There are three standard response files included with the FixTool that can be modified for your configuration needs. To modify a response file, copy one of the standard response files (RESPONSE.WP3, RESPONSE.WP4, or RESPONSE.LAN) to a file called RESPONSE.FIL. Modify the RESPONSE.FIL as needed, and then run FSERVICE /R:RESPONSE.FIL. The following sections show a few of the service actions you can take through a response file. For more information about response files, view the README.INF file that comes with the FixTool. 6.1. Applying Service to a Product Without an Existing Archive This response file can be used to apply service for the first time using FSERVICE when there is no existing archive of the product being serviced. It will service all partitions and place an archive in each partition. It does not take a backup of changed files. In this case, the SERVICE.LOG file will go into the C:\OS2\INSTALL directory. Files that are read-only, hidden, system, or newer will be replaced automatically during service. The FixPak source files are on A:. The FixTool will service all partitions where \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 and \MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM are found, and it will save the original files in an \ARCHIVE directory for each partition serviced. Note that the :LOGFILE tag is optional and may be overridden by using the /L: parameter on the FSERVICE command line. The :FLAGS and :SOURCE tags are also optional, but if used, the :SERVICE tag must be included. The :SOURCE tag can be overridden by using the /S: parameter on the FSERVICE command line. You should include a :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, and :ARCHIVE tag for each product to be serviced. Note that the :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, and :ARCHIVE tags must appear in the order shown in this example. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED REPLACE_NEWER :SOURCE A:\ :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL \OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVE :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL \MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE \ARCHIVE 6.2. Applying Service to a Product With an Existing Archive This response file can be used to apply service using FSERVICE when there is an existing archive of the product being serviced. This demonstrates the ability to take a backup of changed files. Notice that each product serviced must be backed up to a different directory. Also note the order of the :SERVICE, :SYSLEVEL, :ARCHIVE, and :BACKUP tags. These tags must appear in this order. The :BACKUP tag is optional. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :FLAGS REPLACE_PROTECTED REPLACE_NEWER :SOURCE A:\ :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE C:\ARCHIVE :BACKUP C:\BACKUP :SERVICE :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE C:\ARCHIVE :BACKUP C:\BACKUPM 6.3. Backing Out to the Archive Level of a Product This is a sample response file to be used when backing out to the archive level of a product. Note that you can only use one :TARGET tag in the response file. Also note that the :TARGET tag must appear before a :BACKOUT tag is used. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :TARGET ARCHIVE :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM 6.4. Backing Out to the Backup Level of a Product This is a sample response file to be used when backing out to the backup level of a product. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :TARGET BACKUP :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :BACKOUT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM 6.5. Committing a Product This is a sample response file to be used when committing a product. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :COMMIT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :COMMIT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM 6.6. Redirecting an Archive of a Product to Another Existing Archive This is a sample response file to be used when redirecting an archive of a product to another existing archive location. One example of this would be for using a shared network archive. Note that the archive directory specifies the location of an existing archive to which the current product is being redirected. In this example the arbitrary drive shows S:, which may be a LAN drive. :LOGFILE C:\OS2\INSTALL\SERVICE.LOG :REDIRECT :SYSLEVEL C:\OS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.OS2 :ARCHIVE S:\ARCHIVE :REDIRECT :SYSLEVEL C:\MMOS2\INSTALL\SYSLEVEL.MPM :ARCHIVE S:\ARCHIVEM Section 7. If You Have a Problem If the FixPak does not install properly, there are files you can look in to find out what error occurred. The SERVICE.LOG file is the first place to look. The FixTool puts it in the directory where the SYSLEVEL file of the product being serviced is located. Section 8. Setting Environment Variables There are several SET statements that set environment variables for the FixTool to use. See the table below for a list of these variables and a description of what they do. Environment Variable Usage ------------------------------- ----------------------------------- SET CSFUTILPATH=path Allows you to run SERVICE or FSERVICE from your hard drive or from a redirected drive. SET CSFCDROMDIR=path Allows you to install a FixPak from a redirected drive or CD-ROM. SET REMOTE_INSTALL_STATE=0|1 If this variable is set to 1, then upon termination FixTool returns control to the calling process. Section 9. Common Error Messages Here are some common error messages that you may receive when running SERVICE. - Error message: An error occurred while searching for files to update. The reason may be old or corrupt CSF logfiles, CSF_SEL.000 file, or file system corruption. See README file for more information. Explanation: You may get this if you have used the new FixTool to install a FixPak, and then try to use the old FixTool. Solution: If you are installing a LAN FixPak, you can delete all the LOGF0000.xxx and LOGSTART.xxx files on your system, and reapply the FixPak. If you are installing an OS/2 FixPak, you will also need to copy your original SYSLEVEL.OS2 file back into the \OS2\INSTALL directory. - Error message: No products were found on the target system to service. Explanation: Your SYSLEVEL.xxx file does not contain the proper pre-requisite FixPak number or product information. In order to install a FixPak, the number of the FixPak must be higher than the number of the current CSD in the SYSLEVEL.xxx file, or the product information must match. Solution: Check the pre-requisites needed for the FixPak you are trying to install. Some FixPaks have a particular FixPak that must be installed prior to installing that FixPak. Also, make sure that the FixPak you are trying to install is one that may be applied to that product. If the product information is incorrect, you may need to copy the product SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media. Here's a common error message that you might see when running FSERVICE. - Error message: CSF257: No product has been selected. Explanation: This error message is reported in several situations. You may not have selected a product to service in the RESPONSE.FIL, or FSERVICE may not have found any products to service. If FSERVICE didn't find any products to service, either the product information on the system did not match the product information in the FixPak, or FSERVICE determined that the FixPak would back-level the system. Solution: Check the pre-requisites for the FixPak and make sure that the system contains the proper pre-requisites. Also, be sure that the FixPak you are trying to install is being applied to the appropriate product. If the product information is incorrect, you may need to copy the product SYSLEVEL.xxx file from the install media. Section 10. Known Problems Problem Description: On some systems, you may get an unpack error for the file IBMCSFLK.PK@. If this occurs, you will see the following in your SERVICE.LOG file: Unpack( source, destination ) failed with rc 5. Retrying unpack for IBMCSFLK.PK@... where source is the location of the IBMCSFLK.PK@ file, and destination is the location for the unpacking. It will try to unpack the file several times, and then finally report: Error unpacking the file IBMCSFLK.PK@. Workaround: Exit and restart service. The error should be resolved on the second attempt.
 service.boulder.ibm.com/ps/products/os2/fixtool/english-us/cs_138b.exe
Corrective Service facility v. 2-B 1.37b (19/10/1998) Readme/What's new
============================================================================== Corrective Service Facility disks for installing OS/2 2.11, Warp 3 and Warp 4 FixPaks. CS?137B.EXE is a self-extracting PKZIP file that contains CSFBOTnn.1DK, CSFBOTnn.2DK, LOADDSKF.EXE and this file. The CSFBOTnn.?DK files are in LOADDSKF format, use LOADDSKF.EXE to create two diskettes. Note: nn is the two character country code, like FR for French or GR for German, UK for United Kingdon, etc. ============================================================================== Installation: Place a blank, formatted 1.44MB diskette in A: (or B:, whichever is your 3.5inch floppy drive). Enter LOADDSKF CSFBOTnn.1DK A: to create the 1st diskette Place another blank, formatted 1.44MB diskette in the same drive. Enter LOADDSKF CSFBOTnn.2DK A: to create the 2nd diskette ============================================================================== NOTE: CSFBOTnn.1DK contains the README.INF file which is in INF format. To view the readme, place the first kicker disk in A: and enter: VIEW A:\README.INF
 service.boulder.ibm.com/ps/products/os2/fixtool/english-us/cs_137b.exe
Record updated last time on: 11/06/2019 - 11:50

Translate to...

Add new comment